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View Full Version : DC8 and AMPs?


rob020880
04/16/2007, 01:31 PM
So I know the DC8 can handle 15 amps. I am wondering how many amps I will be using with this setup: 2 250watt hqi metal halides, four 65watt t5 actinics, 2 200 watt heaters, one calcium reactor solenoid, led moonlights. Can someone help me figure this out?

dougchambers
04/16/2007, 01:56 PM
Depending on your ballasts, you should be OK, but close.

Metal Halides:
2ea. 250W HQI = ~2.5-3A (5-6A Total)
4ea. 65W T5 = ~.55ea (~2.5A Total)
2ea. 200W Heaters = 1.7Aea (3.4A Total)
Solenoid = Incidental
LED = Incidental

You could be in the 12-13A. Some ballasts spike at well above their rated current draw during startup so I would stage how they turn on with a delay between each light bank.

-Doug

DrBDC
04/16/2007, 02:47 PM
I'd go with 6.5-7 for the hqi ballast since many run up to 350 watts.

dougchambers
04/16/2007, 03:50 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=9740724#post9740724 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by DrBDC
I'd go with 6.5-7 for the hqi ballast since many run up to 350 watts. Ah... Better data! I knew they ran higher, but I didn't realize they were that high...

DrBDC
04/16/2007, 04:49 PM
The highest I see is 373 watts. Here is a pfo hqi ballast page:

http://www.reeflightinginfo.arvixe.com/tabular-ballast-data.php?Watts=250&BallastType=HQI&BallastManuf=PFO+Lighting&BallastName=8&shield=N&Submit=Submit

Apparently the bulb choice makes difference on draw which seems wierd to me but electrical physics is wierd too.

That makes me wonder why you can't put a 175 bulb such as that Iwasaki 15,000K one with the really high par on a standard 250 ballast, that wouldn't be as much overdriving as the 250hqi's are. Or maybe you can? I don't think I'd want to be standing close just in case!

rob020880
04/16/2007, 05:56 PM
Thanks for the help, and it is a pfo ballast.

karlmarx
04/18/2007, 01:24 AM
Im not an electrical engineer, but from creating UPS backup solutions almost all electrical devices have the max output of the device listed by watts and sometimes amps. However to figure out how much amps something is just follow this formula:

Watts = VOLTS * amps

so:
200 watts / 120 Volts = 1.67 Amps
simple now just add up all the stuff and you know