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Brent Thomann
05/25/2007, 12:09 AM
What critter will take care of this algae? -photo

I have the same stuff growing in my display tank but a much larger clump of it, likes a lot of light. I'm no expert but I don't think its hair algae because its more stringy, not really mossy.

Should I add to my refuge?

I've been leaving it in my display tank for my pods to live in but now its getting to big. I'd like to just get some reef safe critters to take care of it? my tangs don't care to eat it either.

http://mjmk.com/temp/algea1s.jpg

larger image HERE (http://mjmk.com/temp/algea1.jpg)

drummereef
05/25/2007, 12:17 AM
Have you looked into a water quality issue? What are you nitrates and phosphates testing? And, what is your water source RO/DI or tap. And do you know the TDS? I would manually remove most of it if you can.

Brent Thomann
05/25/2007, 12:26 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011460#post10011460 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by drummereef
Have you looked into a water quality issue? What are you nitrates and phosphates testing? And, what is your water source RO/DI or tap. And do you know the TDS? I would manually remove most of it if you can.

not really sure if its the water quality.

I use a custom 6 stage RO/DI unit with 0 tds coming out.

Nitrates always .05 for over a year
phos always 0

I do bi weekly water changes, have lots of fish and corals.

you think some turbo snails would help keep it in check?

what is it called?

hooterhead
05/25/2007, 12:30 AM
looks like bryopsis (sp?). Pulling it out and lettuce nudi's should take care of it if that's what it is.

Brent Thomann
05/25/2007, 12:43 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011497#post10011497 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by hooterhead
looks like bryopsis (sp?). Pulling it out and lettuce nudi's should take care of it if that's what it is.

are lettuce nudi's safe to keep? I thought they're toxic?

pledosophy
05/25/2007, 12:45 AM
Some people are having luck with raising magnesium levels in 100ppm intervals up to 1600. The magnesium seems to be effective at blocking the chlorophyl by some means. Sorry not up on the exact science end of it, but it does work. Make sure to use aquarium appropriate magnesium chloride and not the magnesium sulfate as it can bleach corals and kil some inverts in others experienced.

HTH

inwall75
05/25/2007, 01:10 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011561#post10011561 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by pledosophy
Some people are having luck with raising magnesium levels in 100ppm intervals up to 1600. The magnesium seems to be effective at blocking the chlorophyl by some means. Sorry not up on the exact science end of it, but it does work. Make sure to use aquarium appropriate magnesium chloride and not the magnesium sulfate as it can bleach corals and kil some inverts in others experienced.

HTH

I've helped people do this for years to help my friends with bryopsis problems in their tanks. None of my friends ever lost any inverts. I would boost with MgCl2 and then have them maintain the levels with MgSO4 so that the chloride and sulfide levels in the tank didn't get too out of whack.

hahnmeister
05/25/2007, 01:21 AM
Wouldnt that also halt the coral's photosynthesis?

inwall75
05/25/2007, 01:24 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011640#post10011640 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by hahnmeister
Wouldnt that also halt the coral's photosynthesis?

Nope

Not only that, most other macroalgaes are equally unaffected.

Scoobs9083
05/25/2007, 03:48 AM
well you have a 180.. have any tangs? they will destroy that stuff in a matter of hours

edit: hmm just read the entire post :P You have tangs.. thats really odd you would think the tangs would eat it up.

boxfishpooalot
05/25/2007, 04:14 AM
I've helped people do this for years to help my friends with bryopsis problems in their tanks. None of my friends ever lost any inverts. I would boost with MgCl2 and then have them maintain the levels with MgSO4 so that the chloride and sulfide levels in the tank didn't get too out of whack.

This is fine method, but you got it backwards :D

Magnesium sulphate is rich in sulphate. Magnesium chloride is rich in chloride. Both are very poor in magnesium by weight.

Instead he should do a mix of 10 cups MAG flake and 1 cup Epsom salts to achieve balanced ratios. And dose magnesium chloride, or the above mix.

REHEM
05/25/2007, 04:41 AM
I wouldn't dose a single thing if it were me, but I would take the advice of Drummereef and just manually remove as much as you can.

ghostrida3
05/25/2007, 07:29 AM
also u wanna find out whats causin it, its gotta be phosphates. ur probably getting a 00 reading because the algae is absorbing it. that stuff doesnt come from knowhere.

wife no likey
05/25/2007, 10:01 AM
bryopsis can exist in eutrophic conditions - it isn't necessarily a sign of water quality issues.

Lettuce sea slugs worked for me though. :)

You can get them in the "build your own cleaner packages" from Etropicals BTW. Free shipping on an order of $60 or more.

Pete

gman0526
05/25/2007, 11:04 AM
Actually euthropic conditions means high levels of nutrients in the water.

wife no likey
05/25/2007, 11:29 AM
sorry . .olgio :)

TWallace
05/25/2007, 11:32 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011832#post10011832 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by REHEM
I wouldn't dose a single thing if it were me, but I would take the advice of Drummereef and just manually remove as much as you can.

Have you ever had bryopsis?

inwall75
05/25/2007, 11:40 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10011799#post10011799 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by boxfishpooalot
I've helped people do this for years to help my friends with bryopsis problems in their tanks. None of my friends ever lost any inverts. I would boost with MgCl2 and then have them maintain the levels with MgSO4 so that the chloride and sulfide levels in the tank didn't get too out of whack.

This is fine method, but you got it backwards :D

Magnesium sulphate is rich in sulphate. Magnesium chloride is rich in chloride. Both are very poor in magnesium by weight.

Instead he should do a mix of 10 cups MAG flake and 1 cup Epsom salts to achieve balanced ratios. And dose magnesium chloride, or the above mix.

Poo,

We're saying the same thing. Almost all increases were Magnesium Chloride and the maintenance of the higher levels were handled by Magnesium Sulphate. I just didn't dose in a balanced manner the whole time. I threw Chloride out of whack and then adjusted the sulphides later. (We didn't have RHF's home-made recipe's back then. It was experimentation and talking with each other).

With that said, apparently people have been studying what we did and they've determined that a balanced increase of both at the same time is best. Just reasoning it out, that makes complete sense. However, we were flying by the seat of our pants and none of my friends ever lost a thing.

inwall75
05/25/2007, 11:42 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10013656#post10013656 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by gman0526
Actually euthropic conditions means high levels of nutrients in the water.

Jorge,

Picky, picky, picky. :D

(J/K...this is mantisfreak/curtswearing)

wife no likey
05/25/2007, 11:49 AM
actually if you want to be picky, "high" is hypereutrophic


Trophic Level
< 0.3 - Oligotrophic
0.3 - 0.5 - Mesotrophic
0.5 - 1.5 - Eutrophic
> 1.5 - Hypereutrophic

inwall75
05/25/2007, 12:01 PM
It doesn't matter much.

If your tank gets Eutrophic, you're going to have problems keeping many animals. It doesn't have to be hypereutrophic for the problems to occur so I would consider eutrophic to be high nutrients as well.....just not as high as hypereutrophic.

Brent Thomann
05/25/2007, 01:14 PM
I'm going to first just remove the algae and see if it comes back, then I might try the mag thing.

thanks for all the feedback guys, you sure did your homework!

TWallace
05/25/2007, 03:20 PM
If it's bryopsis, removing it manually can make it spread very fast unless you shut down your pumps and run a siphon to suck up the loose parts. Just a word of warning from someone who battled bryopsis for many months. Magnesium did the trick for me, but it hasn't worked for everyone.

boxfishpooalot
05/25/2007, 04:26 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10013865#post10013865 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by inwall75
Poo,

We're saying the same thing. Almost all increases were Magnesium Chloride and the maintenance of the higher levels were handled by Magnesium Sulphate. I just didn't dose in a balanced manner the whole time. I threw Chloride out of whack and then adjusted the sulphides later. (We didn't have RHF's home-made recipe's back then. It was experimentation and talking with each other).

With that said, apparently people have been studying what we did and they've determined that a balanced increase of both at the same time is best. Just reasoning it out, that makes complete sense. However, we were flying by the seat of our pants and none of my friends ever lost a thing.


With a single dose of one magnesium supplement you would be better off dosing just magnesium chloride. After 1 year the chloride would approx raise 1%. :)

gman0526
05/25/2007, 09:42 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10013891#post10013891 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by inwall75
Jorge,

Picky, picky, picky. :D

(J/K...this is mantisfreak/curtswearing)

Oh... I know who you are :D

actually if you want to be picky, "high" is hypereutrophic


Trophic Level
< 0.3 - Oligotrophic
0.3 - 0.5 - Mesotrophic
0.5 - 1.5 - Eutrophic
> 1.5 - Hypereutrophic

Since picky is the word what are those values representing? NO3, PO4, something else? Just so everybody knows what we're talking about ;)

Brent Thomann
05/28/2007, 09:24 PM
update..

I added some Large Turbos and the algae is almost gone, they eat all day.

I should probably stop raising my mag now? currently 1450 from 1300.

Peter Eichler
05/29/2007, 01:40 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10033415#post10033415 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Brent Thomann
update..

I added some Large Turbos and the algae is almost gone, they eat all day.

I should probably stop raising my mag now? currently 1450 from 1300.

Yeah, skip raising the Magnesium. It was most likely Derbesia and not Bryopsis. I don't know why so many people in this thread assumed it was Bryopsis, especially with how long it appeared in the photos.

inwall75
05/29/2007, 11:25 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10034394#post10034394 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Peter Eichler
Yeah, skip raising the Magnesium. It was most likely Derbesia and not Bryopsis. I don't know why so many people in this thread assumed it was Bryopsis, especially with how long it appeared in the photos.

I have seen Bryopsis MUCH longer than that before. Beyond that, the fact that the tangs wouldn't eat it is more indicative of Bryopsis over Derbasia.

With that said, the photo is very blurry and neither of us will ever know for sure.

Brent Thomann
05/29/2007, 12:53 PM
I really appreciate all your help guys. You help make this hobby that much more enjoyable for us all!

I'll let you know if it comes back and get better photos next time.


Thanks,
Brent

inwall75
05/29/2007, 01:10 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10036919#post10036919 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Brent Thomann
I'll let you know if it comes back and get better photos next time.


Brent,

In one of my better photo's, one of my buddies likened it to the blurry Patterson-Gimlin film of Bigfoot from the 70's http://www.oregonbigfoot.com/patterson.php and that he didn't believe I really had a mantis shrimp. :D

No worries my friend.....I gave up trying to take tank photos long ago.

Peter Eichler
05/29/2007, 01:14 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10036284#post10036284 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by inwall75
I have seen Bryopsis MUCH longer than that before. Beyond that, the fact that the tangs wouldn't eat it is more indicative of Bryopsis over Derbasia.

With that said, the photo is very blurry and neither of us will ever know for sure.

I don't know why you would say that, Tangs rarely if ever eat Bryopsis sp.

inwall75
05/29/2007, 01:27 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10037097#post10037097 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Peter Eichler
I don't know why you would say that, Tangs rarely if ever eat Bryopsis sp.

I agree. The only one I've heard of that will is OCASSIONALLY the Kole Tang.


That's why I said this...

the fact that the tangs wouldn't eat it is more indicative of Bryopsis over Derbasia.

Brent Thomann
05/29/2007, 01:38 PM
you guys make me laugh.... keep it going :)

Peter Eichler
05/30/2007, 12:07 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10037190#post10037190 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by inwall75
I agree. The only one I've heard of that will is OCASSIONALLY the Kole Tang.


That's why I said this...

Sorry about that, misread your post. I've never seen the really long stringy Bryopsis but I've seen really long Derbesia plenty of times.