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View Full Version : this is the new tank with most if not all the rocks ill put in


EllisColes
05/30/2007, 09:31 PM
here are the pics bc i know everyone loves pictures


http://reefcentral.com/gallery/data/500/156905new_tank-1.JPG



http://reefcentral.com/gallery/data/500/156905new_tank-3.JPG http://reefcentral.com/gallery/data/500/156905new_tank-2.JPG

and yes the lights are def. temporary while i build the top but dang they really do put out alot of light for 10 dollars at home depot

EdKruzel
05/30/2007, 09:35 PM
I wouldn't add any more rock, what you have is more than sufficient and looks nice. My question is; what's up with the bubble wand in a saltwater tank?

nick18tjetta
05/30/2007, 09:37 PM
Get rid of the bubbles and get a couple of MH's over that tank and you will have something there.

I also agree that you do not need more rock, maybe rearange it a little, but you don't need more.

EllisColes
05/30/2007, 09:55 PM
oh and the bubble wand is a really good thing for water movement and thats also temporary! but seriously its got water goin everywhere

EllisColes
05/30/2007, 10:46 PM
is it good or bad?

alan214
05/30/2007, 11:39 PM
Well, it's probably not going to hurt anything but the bubbles will likely impair visibility a little. Then there's the fact that most reefs in the wild don't have concentrations of bubbles like that so who knows how corals would react to them in the event you decided to leave in the wand.

EllisColes
05/30/2007, 11:44 PM
maybe it wouldnt actually be a bad idea to try it to experiment hmm? i should try it

plawrence5
05/30/2007, 11:51 PM
My only concern would be if the bubbles would increase the likiness of green hair algae growth? My buddy has a wet/dry sump on his tank and that thing in a real pain in the butt because you have to constantly add water to the tank.. however, my point is.. the sump running dry makes the return line blow air bubbles into the tanks.. and it seems that this may have something to do with the fact that there seems to be an increase in algae growth in this tank. We have 4 other tanks in the house all using the same water etc.. but this is the only one with the algae problem. The question is.. are air bubbles and algae growth linked? Anyone have any insight?

EllisColes
05/30/2007, 11:55 PM
hmm good question, i did have one concern but it may or may not be a problem but bubbles get get trapped in the fish's gills and it will end up killing it! but its worth a try to see how it is

EdKruzel
05/31/2007, 09:53 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10048163#post10048163 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by plawrence5
The question is.. are air bubbles and algae growth linked? Anyone have any insight?

That question has so many variables that I can't type enough to answer them all, so I'll give some general insights.

Wet/Dry systems and the use of bioballs are great at reducing ammonia and nitrite, but create vast amounts of nitrate which is a prime source for the growth of algae. Frequent large water changes, activated carbon and a good skimmer will help alleviate that problem.
Next you write that when the sump gets too low it pulls air into the return pump. That is a problem because as water evaporates the minerals are left behind; the up and down of SG creates a very unstable environment, opening the opportunity for nuisance algae growth to get a foot hold on the system.

As to bubbles and their effect in a system, here is an overview:

Fish can handle bubbles from time to time, but as a constant it will create added stress and this can reduce the immune system.

Bubbles trapped under any corals for a significant amount of time will cause that area to become necrotic and you will lose that portion of the coral if not the entire colony.

Because of the SG/minerals in the water, bubbles tend to be smaller than if in fresh water and therefore will reduce visibility in the tank; second the release at the water surface will create an extreme amount of salt creep for you to clean.

A couple of powerheads on timers (and removing the bubble wand) for alternating current will quickly solve this problem.

madamo
05/31/2007, 10:03 AM
I read in a saltwater article that bubble wands actually raise the PH in the system...Just my two cents!

Good Luck with you new "child"

SeanySean
05/31/2007, 10:11 AM
Looks good with more rock, I am very surprised that peoples opinion are that more rock is not needed?

I thought it was 2lbs of rock per 1 gallon of water is this wrong, do I have wat too much rock I have about 200lbs in a 130G setup

EdKruzel
05/31/2007, 10:43 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10049836#post10049836 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by SeanySean
I am very surprised that peoples opinion are that more rock is not needed?

I thought it was 2lbs of rock per 1 gallon of water is this wrong, do I have way too much rock I have about 200lbs in a 130G setup

Pounds per gallon is another myth in this hobby. Rock types vary in density and therefore in weight by appeared volume. If you were to fill a tank all the way to the top with Fiji rock and then did the same to an identical tank but used Caribbean rock the weight would be at least double. As for biological use, a thin layer of fine sand provides more space for bacteria then filling the entire tank with any kind of rock. I recommend about 30-50% volume of the tank, providing excessive crevices, caves and overhangs while leaving ample room for fish to swim in the open.


I read in a saltwater article that bubble wands actually raise the PH in the system [/QUOTE]

It's not the bubble wand, but the bubble moving the top millimeter of water surface. Surface agitation is where all gas exchange occurs and this is easily duplicated with the use of powerheads or an overflow and sump. Keeping a healthy system with good skimming, frequent water changes and a Kalkwasser drip will also keep parameters in check.

Shagsbeard
05/31/2007, 10:45 AM
You're going to have a problem with salt creep. Those bubbles bursting are going to deposit salt all over the place. A bubble wand creates a huge mess in the long term. Powerheads create flow and surface agitation without creating as much salt creep.

mg426
05/31/2007, 11:46 AM
I would take the above advice myself, ditch the airstone and leave the LR as is. It going to look nice when you get it running.

EllisColes
05/31/2007, 01:10 PM
haha the first plan was to take it out when the cycle is over then i talked with a guy and he changed my mind to try and experiment with it but i guess its not a bad idea to take it out when the cycle is over! but yeah the lb per gallon thing to me is kinda dumb bc with a bowfront tank its gonnna look a little goofy with 150 lbs of lr in there but the real thing IMO is 1/3 of the swimming space should be covered in lR so thats what i went by