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reeffreak1
07/11/2007, 02:23 PM
I have, like the title says, a 55 gallon L tank from All-Glass that I bought around...oh...10 years ago or so. Does anyone know if the bottom or rear glass on those tanks is tempered glass or not?

I'd like to be able to drill/dremel holes into it for an overflow and return.

Thanks.

leebo_28
07/11/2007, 02:33 PM
from what I was told...all 55 gals are tempered , call all-glass or try to find out at www.all-glass.com

reeffreak1
07/11/2007, 02:37 PM
Thanks for the link and the heads up.

It would appear that All-Glass was bought out by Aqueon? Their site has nothing on it at this point.

So, drilling the returns is simply out of the question, and I'm going to have to either live with a hang on overflow....or upgrade tanks then?

GTR
07/11/2007, 03:05 PM
I don't think there was a buy-out other than Central Garden & Pet bought them in 2000. I just think they are combining some product lines under the umbrella of Aqueon which would lead to better name recognition.

SteveU

jdrabek
07/14/2007, 10:11 PM
Just shattered the back of my 55 gallon AGA that I thought was not tempered. Tried drilling a hole for an overflow.

Turns out all the sides of the 55 are tempered. My tank was about ten years old also. I dont know if the newer ones are any different.

Kentanner11
07/15/2007, 01:12 PM
wow that sucks!

reeffreak1
07/16/2007, 07:30 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10342443#post10342443 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by jdrabek
Just shattered the back of my 55 gallon AGA that I thought was not tempered. Tried drilling a hole for an overflow.

Turns out all the sides of the 55 are tempered. My tank was about ten years old also. I dont know if the newer ones are any different.

Do you know if the bottom is tempered too?

hllywd
07/16/2007, 07:42 AM
I can tell you my only experience with a 55 was dropping it on my garage floor trying to move it myself. I can assure you all five panels were tempered. They make the most interesting sound for about another half hour after you do that....:eek:

It's pretty easy to determine whether or not it's tempered using a couple polarized camer filters though...

Tim

reeffreak1
07/16/2007, 07:51 AM
Hm. Darn.

Guess that means I'm going to have to build a kill switch into the over flow box then to keep the return pump from coming back on after loss of power...

Thanks everyone.

Dberg79
07/16/2007, 08:10 AM
I was able to cut my 55 gal back.

hllywd
07/16/2007, 08:30 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10348965#post10348965 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by reeffreak1
Hm. Darn.

Guess that means I'm going to have to build a kill switch into the over flow box then to keep the return pump from coming back on after loss of power...

Thanks everyone.

Why would you not want the return pump to start back up after a power failure?
Any overflow box you use should not lose siphon when the power goes out, both ends of the siphon itself should remain under water and begin working again as soon as power is restored and the tank level rises.

My over the back overflows have been VERY reliable through the years. I've had four basic problems with them through the years:

1) Too little flow allows air to build up in the siphon, make sure your pump is big enough and throttle it back if you need to.

2) Algae builds up in clear siphon tubes blocking outflow.

3) Mine have sponge filters, if I don't clean them once a week they start to impede the outflow.

4) Unattended teenagers.

All except the last are easy to anticipate and control...:D

Tim

reeffreak1
07/16/2007, 08:40 AM
If I remember right, my U-tube for some reason would actually lose suction. It drained all the water right out of the overflow, lost suction, and then would not start again when the power came back on.

<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10349147#post10349147 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by hllywd
Why would you not want the return pump to start back up after a power failure?
Any overflow box you use should not lose siphon when the power goes out, both ends of the siphon itself should remain under water and begin working again as soon as power is restored and the tank level rises.

My over the back overflows have been VERY reliable through the years. I've had four basic problems with them through the years:

1) Too little flow allows air to build up in the siphon, make sure your pump is big enough and throttle it back if you need to.

2) Algae builds up in clear siphon tubes blocking outflow.

3) Mine have sponge filters, if I don't clean them once a week they start to impede the outflow.

4) Unattended teenagers.

All except the last are easy to anticipate and control...:D

Tim