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Nem0
09/09/2007, 09:04 PM
Is there a long term side-effect on dosing sugar to control nitrate?

What is the longest time (in term of years) anyone has used the above with no sign of crashing?

Nem0
09/10/2007, 06:57 PM
Anyone?

airinhere
09/10/2007, 07:37 PM
I think the biggest risk is the possibility that the bacteria you will be feeding (by dosing the sugar) can suffocate your other tank inhabitants (by using up all the available oxygen in your tank) if the bacteria have a huge population explosion.

So you have to be careful to start your dose regime slowly and work up to an amount that will be able to consume your nitrates, but not cause a huge bloom of bacteria. Oh, and the sudden death of a bloom of bacteria could screw up your water chemistry pretty bad also.

I have used this method whenever I first set up any tank with aragocrete rocks (instead of established live rocks). I added a single heaping teaspoon of sugar for each hundred gallons of tank capacity. The sugar dosing kept my Nitrates under control untill my aragocrete rocks became "live" (Usually took around 3-6 months.)

Theoretically, you could dose sugar forever I guess, but each time you dose you are risking a bacterial bloom that can have unexpected side effects in your tank. Besides, unless you are keeping too much bioload for your tank to handle, I dont see a real need to dose sugar for the long term.

tmz
09/10/2007, 07:57 PM
I used vodka for two months combined with heavy skimming it scrubbed well. However, my xenia and anthelia colonies waned in the nutrient poor water.

greenbean36191
09/11/2007, 06:32 AM
Long-term increases in organic carbon in the wild have been shown to increase coral mortality.

"The bacteria are likely part of the symbiotic community living within the coral tissue... If the system becomes out of balance – let's say, by adding too much simple sugars – and the bacteria start growing too quickly, then the balance breaks down. The same bacteria that were likely beneficial grow so quickly that they actually can end up killing the coral"- David Kline speaking about his work looking at which component of sewage was most detrimental to coral health. It was simple sugars.

Basically, you not only fuel desirable bacterial growth, but you also fuel the growth of opportunistic pathogens, including Herpes that normally live harmlessly on the coral.

einsteins
09/11/2007, 09:34 AM
It caused Fin rot on both of my Tangs....

Aquarist007
09/11/2007, 09:57 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10741625#post10741625 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by greenbean36191
Long-term increases in organic carbon in the wild have been shown to increase coral mortality.

"The bacteria are likely part of the symbiotic community living within the coral tissue... If the system becomes out of balance – let's say, by adding too much simple sugars – and the bacteria start growing too quickly, then the balance breaks down. The same bacteria that were likely beneficial grow so quickly that they actually can end up killing the coral"- David Kline speaking about his work looking at which component of sewage was most detrimental to coral health. It was simple sugars.

Basically, you not only fuel desirable bacterial growth, but you also fuel the growth of opportunistic pathogens, including Herpes that normally live harmlessly on the coral.

this is why I prefer more natural methods of controlling nitrates:
refugium with chaeto

basting the surface very lightly with a turkey baster--put nitrates etc back into the water column where they can be filtered off

growing lots of xenia

using the app size skimmer for my system---if you want the diverisity of life -inverts and bacteria from your fuge---why skimm it all off.

deep sand beds in tank, refug and sometimes even in sumps.

and of course regular water changes.

Trix are for kids
Vodka is for us
:rollface: :rollface: