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best49erfan
12/01/2007, 10:33 PM
This is my final step at me level control system. I have to lengthen the level switch wires. I plan to solder them and heat shrink them. But beyond that, what should I do? should I just silicone around that or maybe use rubber tape?

GuySmilie
12/01/2007, 11:32 PM
If you're concerned about corrosion of the splice joint, I think a nice soldering job covered with a nice tight heat shrink (on each joint - not together) should do the trick. For bonus points, then you could heat shrink both insulated joints together, i.e., the whole splice area.

I assume you know enough to stagger the joints so they don't rub against each other.

kgross
12/02/2007, 12:55 AM
If the splice will be underwater, you will want to heat shrink them both together and I would suggest trying to put a little silicone around the ends of the top heat shrink. It is not going to be under water, I would still do three heat shrinks but I would not worry about any silicone.

Kim

best49erfan
12/02/2007, 01:35 AM
some of them will be under water

jmkarcz
12/02/2007, 11:14 AM
Why not solder the connections, heat shrint them, and thread them thru a tube or small diameter pipe up to the switch. Then, flood the end of the switch side of the tube with silicone and cover the wires to the switch really well with silicone as well. this will also protect the wires.

Donw
12/02/2007, 01:10 PM
I would not put a float switch splice under water ever. They come with long enoug leads so there should be no splice under the water. If your leads are that short I would mount them in pvc pipe.

Don

best49erfan
12/02/2007, 06:15 PM
i could not find any with longer wires. It will be ok.

best49erfan
12/03/2007, 07:28 PM
Well, I finished. I offset the solder joints, heatshrinked the individual wires. then heatshrinked both wires. used some tubing to cover it up and filled it with Alex caulk.

GuySmilie
12/03/2007, 10:29 PM
Sounds like you're good to go! :thumbsup:

mg426
12/03/2007, 11:12 PM
Should work.

hebygb
12/04/2007, 10:41 AM
sorry for the slight highjack but, the other day i reached in my main display to feed my fish (they like to eat from my hand) and I felt a shock.... yikes... I did a quick head count and everyone was accounted for... dried my hand ... tried again and zap...

Seems like my submersible heater wore out its welcome in the sump. Just thought Id share that after reading the discussion of underwater wiring splices.

Worldwithin
12/04/2007, 10:50 AM
you could create a splice via soldering them together. Once the splice cools, you can gob silicone over it, and then slide the heatshrink over the gob of silicone, effectively creating a sealed splice. Shrink the tubing while the silicone is still gooey and then once the silicone dries, it should be completely sealed. For added safety, you can silicone the ends of the tubing shut as well. The object is to seal the splice as best as possible with the silicone, trying to not get any air under the silicone. Then compress it with the tubing.

I have done this a few times in wet locations with great success. There is always a chance of failure, but if you need to splice in an area that will need to be wet, this is a rather non-toxic option.

:fish1::hammer:

Myrddraal
12/04/2007, 12:59 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=11312057#post11312057 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Worldwithin
you could create a splice via soldering them together. Once the splice cools, you can gob silicone over it, and then slide the heatshrink over the gob of silicone, effectively creating a sealed splice. Shrink the tubing while the silicone is still gooey and then once the silicone dries, it should be completely sealed. For added safety, you can silicone the ends of the tubing shut as well. The object is to seal the splice as best as possible with the silicone, trying to not get any air under the silicone. Then compress it with the tubing.

I have done this a few times in wet locations with great success. There is always a chance of failure, but if you need to splice in an area that will need to be wet, this is a rather non-toxic option.

:fish1::hammer:

This is a great method, and one that I've used on lighting in damp areas in the past. Hot glue works as well.

best49erfan
01/08/2008, 09:38 AM
I completed this a little while ago and it works. Last night i was taking some excess water out and I got shocked. I thought it was my new system, but it was the skimmer pump putting 30 VAC into my tank.....ouch....