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mattnbecs
01/02/2009, 07:58 AM
Can Mighty Putty be used to attach corals? Has anyone tried it? Does it work well?

jenglish
01/02/2009, 09:08 AM
I have been told that aquamend is the same thing as a 2 part epoxy stick sold at local big box home improvement store like Lowes and will work to attach coral though most people tend to have better luck w/ superglue.epoxy will make your skimmer go marginally bonkers for awhile. I have not tried epoxy and am a superglue guy myself. hopefully someone w/ firsthand experience will come along

cczarnik
01/02/2009, 09:11 AM
I think it's just a common epoxy stick wrapped up in a nice infomercial. Would prob work, but so does the one from lowe's (at less $$).

On superglue / epoxy, I use both. SG is great for gluing down mats / small frags (I also use a dab of baking soda to help accelerate the cure. I use the epoxy if I need to glue / shape a base for a frag that won't encrust (candy cane corals for example).

BrassMonkey
01/02/2009, 10:07 AM
i like the locktite epoxy better cause it sets in five minutes.

smsreefer
01/02/2009, 11:21 AM
CCZARNIK :
expand a little on the baking soda accelerant technique .
not to hyjack the thread ..unless this is common knowledge , it sounds like good info to me .

mattnbecs ,
hyped up epoxy IMO , if it's safe for drinking water it should be ok.

cczarnik
01/02/2009, 11:47 AM
SMS, re: baking soda... This is a trick I learned from my model aircraft building days...

The thicker the CA, the longer it takes to set. Also, water will interfere with the curing process- in the process of gluing frags, you can end up with a gloppy mess.

Dry the spot on the rock and the bottom of the frag as much as possible. Put a dab of CA on the back of the frag, put just a little (few grains) of baking soda (or alk buffer) on the rock where you want to glue it. Stick them together. The soda accelerates the cure, the more you use, the faster it will bond.

You can also glue your specimen as usual, and sprinkle a little soda around the joint where the glue seeps out.

The soda is obviously reef safe, but be careful not to get it on the tissues of the corals (just like care should be taken not to get glue on the tissues).

CA joints using this method require far less glue, and IMHO are much stronger. I've written about this in a couple of posts before, but this doesn't seem to be common knowledge. For the model aviation guys nearly 100% of them use some type of accelerant with CA (either commercial sprays or DIY balsa dust / baking soda / etc.). It can also be used to build fillets of CA around larger corals - using layers - ca / soda / set / ca / soda / etc. But I just use epoxy for that.

smsreefer
01/02/2009, 12:08 PM
cczarnik ,
ok ,thanks for the trick .
[ caught the area your at also, up by hobby lobby ..great shop ..ordering a telemaster there soon.]

sorry for the sidetrack on the thread..great tip though !

stanlalee
01/02/2009, 12:21 PM
I asked this once before. this stuff looks EXACTLY like marinelands expoxy right down to the packaging tube but is alot cheaper. would love to know for sure.

reefergeorge
01/02/2009, 12:46 PM
I use aqua-mend from Home depot. Almost positive it is the same as billy's mighty putty.

mattnbecs
01/02/2009, 05:40 PM
Thanks for all the input, not just the mighty putty. All great insider info

Zestay
01/02/2009, 07:02 PM
i use loctites. same thing except my stuff is blue not green. dont know if theres a diffrence. but my tank is still alive and well.

it takes a while for the coraline to grow on it from my experiences. maybe i could mix some kalkpowder in it to encourage it..

mattnbecs
01/04/2009, 05:10 PM
I used the Mighty Putty. It set pretty quickly (hardens in 20min), but it really stinks.... No adverse effect on the tanks as yet

otrlynn
01/04/2009, 06:28 PM
Can this baking soda accelerant technique only be used when you are using CA out of water? Or can you dry the frag, put the glue on the frag, put the baking soda on the CA thats on the frag, then stick the frag to the submerged rock?

<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14063166#post14063166 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by cczarnik
SMS, re: baking soda... This is a trick I learned from my model aircraft building days...

The thicker the CA, the longer it takes to set. Also, water will interfere with the curing process- in the process of gluing frags, you can end up with a gloppy mess.

Dry the spot on the rock and the bottom of the frag as much as possible. Put a dab of CA on the back of the frag, put just a little (few grains) of baking soda (or alk buffer) on the rock where you want to glue it. Stick them together. The soda accelerates the cure, the more you use, the faster it will bond.

You can also glue your specimen as usual, and sprinkle a little soda around the joint where the glue seeps out.

The soda is obviously reef safe, but be careful not to get it on the tissues of the corals (just like care should be taken not to get glue on the tissues).

CA joints using this method require far less glue, and IMHO are much stronger. I've written about this in a couple of posts before, but this doesn't seem to be common knowledge. For the model aviation guys nearly 100% of them use some type of accelerant with CA (either commercial sprays or DIY balsa dust / baking soda / etc.). It can also be used to build fillets of CA around larger corals - using layers - ca / soda / set / ca / soda / etc. But I just use epoxy for that.