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View Full Version : 0.2 Micron Sediment Filter....A++


old salty
09/28/2009, 07:05 PM
Russ,

One year ago, I installed new filters in my RO/DI unit. My goal was to find the combination of filters which work the best to protect the carbon block, which in turn will protect the RO filter.


This first picture was taken one year ago. These filters have been in use for six months. From right to left, there is a 5 micron nominal, 1 micron nominal, and then the 0.6 micron carbon block (the DI resin is on the left, but that is not part of this post.)


http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a129/olsaltybastard/RODISanitize001.jpg



This time, I let things go for one year in order to see how well the 0.2 micron filter actually works. Here is a picture I took tonight of the three filters; from right to left is the 1 micron, 0.2 micron, and the carbon block.


http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a129/olsaltybastard/BFSFilter-1.jpg


As you can see from the picture, even one year after the installation of this filter, the carbon block is as clean as the day I installed it. Compare that to the carbon block that was only six months old in the first picture. Having a 215g tank, I make a lot of water in one year; about 30 gallons a week.


Having tried many other sediment filters in the past, NONE of them have been able to keep the carbon block as free of sediment as the 0.2 micron filter. I wanted to take the time to show others what a superior product is capable of doing. For those customers who are looking to do things better rather than cheaper, I hope the pictures above convince them of where there money is being spent.

Buckeye Hydro
09/28/2009, 07:46 PM
Russ,

One year ago, I installed new filters in my RO/DI unit. My goal was to find the combination of filters which work the best to protect the carbon block, which in turn will protect the RO filter.


This first picture was taken one year ago. These filters have been in use for six months. From right to left, there is a 5 micron nominal, 1 micron nominal, and then the 0.6 micron carbon block (the DI resin is on the left, but that is not part of this post.)


http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a129/olsaltybastard/RODISanitize001.jpg



This time, I let things go for one year in order to see how well the 0.2 micron filter actually works. Here is a picture I took tonight of the three filters; from right to left is the 1 micron, 0.2 micron, and the carbon block.


http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a129/olsaltybastard/BFSFilter-1.jpg


As you can see from the picture, even one year after the installation of this filter, the carbon block is as clean as the day I installed it. Compare that to the carbon block that was only six months old in the first picture. Having a 215g tank, I make a lot of water in one year; about 30 gallons a week.


Having tried many other sediment filters in the past, NONE of them have been able to keep the carbon block as free of sediment as the 0.2 micron filter. I wanted to take the time to show others what a superior product is capable of doing. For those customers who are looking to do things better rather than cheaper, I hope the pictures above convince them of where there money is being spent.

Wow - now that's pretty dramatic.

What info are you getting from your pressure gauge. With the 0.2 mic filter holding all that sediment, have you noticed any reduction in pressure?

Do you have well water?

Russ

old salty
09/29/2009, 05:45 AM
No reduction in pressure, but a slight increase as it begins to clog. To remedy this, I simply turn the pressure on the booster pump down a bit. My system has a ball valve which I use to obtain the 4:1 waste to permeate ratio, then the pressure is adjusted to 80-82psi. I am on Northern Kentucky Water District No. 9, which gets its water from the Ohio River. Every six months, the fire department flushes the hydrants which usually results in rusty water for a few minutes. As you can see, I manage to capture some of this rust!!