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iwishtofish
12/08/2009, 09:16 AM
Has anyone done this? I want to set up a 75g as a peninsula tank, so I'd like to drill one of the side panels for an overflow. Problem is, I'm afraid I could damage or stress the tank if I stand it up vertically on one end. Besides, I'd have to stand on a ladder to drill it!

I recall seeing a video on YouTube where someone drilled their 2/3-full tank horizontally. A friend just stood there with a spray bottle of water the whole time to keep things cool.

If anyone has done this, please share your experiences/tips!

Jersey Bounce
12/08/2009, 09:41 AM
I've drilled over two dozen tanks--all horizontally (at a 'small' end of the tank, with the top facing sideways). The largest though were 65 gallon Aqueon (All-Glass) tanks. I've never had an issue with anything being stressed or leaking afterward. Assuming it's a quality, structurally sound tank to begin with, I'd personally have no hesitation in drilling a 75 while it's standing on end. Honestly, I think it's probably safest that way given the need to keep water at the drilling site and being able to stabilize the tank and have as much control as possible over the pressure/angle/etc.

cindre2000
12/08/2009, 09:57 AM
When I set up my mom's 120 peninsula style; I drilled 5 holes in the side panel. I just took it outside, stood it on it's end, turned on the hose, and started drilling. It took 45 minutes but the tank has been running well over a year now with no problems.

iwishtofish
12/08/2009, 11:11 AM
Thanks Jersey bounce and cindre2000. I guess I'll be standing it up.

I know it is recommended to use a cordless drill in order to help prevent frying one's self, but is that the only reason? Does the drill have to have a clutch feature to prevent the bit from binding?

Jersey Bounce
12/08/2009, 11:14 AM
When I drill a tank, I have the cordless drill in 'drill mode' not 'screwdriver mode' that will stop the shaft should binding occur. (sorry I don't know the technical terms) In 'drill mode' I've never had a bit start binding.

noahm
12/08/2009, 11:23 AM
The reason a cordless drill is preferred is that you can set the speed easily and set the clutch all the way down so that any resistance will just stop the bit instead of grabbing the glass and potentially cracking it. It may be annoying for it to stop w/ the clutch, but it is a good indicator of how much pressure you are putting on it. The shocking hazard is minimal as long as you keep water from running down the cord on a corded drill.

iwishtofish
12/08/2009, 11:28 AM
When I drill a tank, I have the cordless drill in 'drill mode' not 'screwdriver mode' that will stop the shaft should binding occur. (sorry I don't know the technical terms) In 'drill mode' I've never had a bit start binding.


The reason a cordless drill is preferred is that you can set the speed easily and set the clutch all the way down so that any resistance will just stop the bit instead of grabbing the glass and potentially cracking it.

Ok, looks like I'l be spending more money - I swear it never ends!! :lol: I don't think I know anyone who has one I can borrow.

Any recommendations, by chance, regarding the power (voltage) of the cordless drill? Good, economical brands? Thanks again for the help!

noahm
12/08/2009, 11:39 AM
check with HD (some rent), or any tool rental place. Might cost you 10-15 bucks for the day. Makita, DeWalt, Hitachi all are good. The key is getting something that will last battery wise, at least 12v, preferably 18v .

iwishtofish
12/08/2009, 11:41 AM
check with HD (some rent), or any tool rental place. Might cost you 10-15 bucks for the day. Makita, DeWalt, Hitachi all are good. The key is getting something that will last battery wise, at least 12v, preferably 18v .

Good idea - I'll call around to see who rents. :)

am3gross
12/08/2009, 12:13 PM
the drill i have is only used for drilling tanks... it is a black and decker and it was the cheapest rechargeable drill that walmart has. it barely holds a charge for more then 2-3 hours and if you press to hard it will stop and not drill.... now these all sound like negatives but in fact to me they are all positives. they make you go slow and not rush the drilling of the tank. you have to go slow or else the drill will not work. hope this helps, i know if i used my nice drill that i would get out there and go to fast and break something... more power!!!

mikey!!!!

iwishtofish
12/08/2009, 12:34 PM
Good to know, Mikey. Thank you for sharing that. I'm sure I'll be in WalMart soon, and I'll check it out.