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jupiter
01/20/2010, 11:12 AM
Hi,
I'm using a Reeflo Dart pump which has the outlet size of 1.5". I'd like to drill the tank for the holes for the return because I don't like the look of plumbing coming over the back of the tank. I want to drill two 1" holes which doesn't quite add up to one 1.5" hole. My question is, is it acceptable to use 1.5" plumbing up until the 1" bulkhead or should I drill two 1.5" holes?

Thanks for any help.

kretzkiller
01/20/2010, 11:28 AM
Is there any reason why you don't want to drill 1.5" holes? I wouldn't want to reduce the flow that much, but I don't think it would be an issue if you have a reducer.

jupiter
01/20/2010, 12:18 PM
The 1.5" holes just seem big. Either way is fine, though. I was just curious.

pmcadams
01/20/2010, 01:54 PM
Keep in mind that the hole you drill does not equal the pipe size... ie. I need to drill a 1 3/4 hole to accommodate the bulkhead for my 1 inch pvc and a 1 1/2 hole for a bulkhead for 3/4 pvc.

With that in mind, there is no reason why you can't plumb a T off of your 1 1/2 inch output line and put a reducer fitting on each side to drop it to 1 inch or 3/4 inch pvc, but I would not go smaller. Either way, the drilled hole will need to be either 1 3/4 or 1 1/2, depending on which output size you choose. My drains are 1 inch pvc and my returns are 3/4.

tommyb
01/20/2010, 03:37 PM
That is what I would do. Go 1.5" up until the T and then reduce to 1". I made the mistake of going down to 2 returns that were 3/4" and it was way too much pressure. Also, include a T to divert water back to the sump if you need to because the Dart is super powerful.

jupiter
01/20/2010, 05:01 PM
Keep in mind that the hole you drill does not equal the pipe size... ie. I need to drill a 1 3/4 hole to accommodate the bulkhead for my 1 inch pvc and a 1 1/2 hole for a bulkhead for 3/4 pvc.

With that in mind, there is no reason why you can't plumb a T off of your 1 1/2 inch output line and put a reducer fitting on each side to drop it to 1 inch or 3/4 inch pvc, but I would not go smaller. Either way, the drilled hole will need to be either 1 3/4 or 1 1/2, depending on which output size you choose. My drains are 1 inch pvc and my returns are 3/4.
That is what I would do. Go 1.5" up until the T and then reduce to 1". I made the mistake of going down to 2 returns that were 3/4" and it was way too much pressure. Also, include a T to divert water back to the sump if you need to because the Dart is super powerful.

The hole saw is 45 mm (1-3/4) for the 1 and I also have a 65 mm (2.5) hole saw. I already drilled the overflow holes.

The idea was that I would use 1.5 up until the T and then reduce to 1 but I wasnt sure if that would give a large enough diameter output to accommodate the 1.5 output of the pump.

I like the idea of T-ing off the pump. So since Im a little slow, what exactly will I be doing? Do I use a valve to control how much water goes to the display meaning the excess goes to the sump? Or is there a valve on the other side? Is this a ball or gate valve? I admit I havent researched this yet so I wont be offended if you tell me to do this.

Either way, I will drill the 1 holes for the return now.

Thanks for the help.

pmcadams
01/21/2010, 07:37 AM
I was not able to find a decent photo, perhaps someone here can post their system plumbing if similar.

Basically you need your pumps input and output line attached to PVC with a coupler or union sort of like this - http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/ImageViewer.aspx?description=Union+PVC+Socket+Fitting&curimage=pipe%2f28007p.jpg&image=pipe%2f28007p.jpg&catid=726&itemid=22823

That allows you to remove the pump if necessary without cutting pipe. It's also a good idea to put a gate or ball valve on the line coming out of your sump to the pump input, so you can close this line down, rather than drain your sump, if you need to remove the pump.

On the opposite end of that coupling from your pump you glue a reducer into the coupler- http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=25034&catid=726

Then out of your reducer, the T - http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=22715&catid=726

From there you can either hard plumb it all the way up to your two returns OR on each side of the T glue a hose nipple and run flex up to hose nipples on the bottoms of your returns - http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=24119&catid=568

NOTE - ALWAYS use hose clamps on flex hose.

These were just some samples photos of fittings... they make these things in about every configuration you can think of, threaded, smooth, etc. If you have not worked with PVC before, please get qualified help. It will save you time and money to find a friend that has.

I did locate this link which I thought had some good tips -

http://www.aquariumpros.com/articles/pumptips.shtml

Good luck :)

jupiter
01/21/2010, 05:08 PM
Thanks for the detailed response. I'm not new to PVC and I'm pretty comfortable with it but methods of plumbing seem to have changed since I last set up a tank. I think pumps are stronger or better now. I oversized the return pump because I can't imagine I'll keep this current tank for longer than a year or so and I want to save some money by buying bigger now.

So the plan, I think, I'll go with is this:
1) 2" True union from the sump to the pump so I can remove it for maintenance.
2) 1.5" True union on the output of the pump.
3) 1.5" T fitting next
4) 1" reducer next
5) 1" gate valve for control
6) 1" hose barb.

On the other end of the T I'll have the excess return to the sump. This is the part of the design I'm not sure about.

I want the gate valve on the return because I want to control the amount of flow going to the tank. The tank is tiny (only 75 gallons) and the overflow can't handle more than about 2000 gph so I'd rather not depend on the diameter of the 1" pipe to be the limiting factor.

I also want the pump to be unrestricted so whatever water doesn't go through the return line can return back to the sump. I just don't know if the water flow will preferentially chose the end of the T that goes back to the sump. I'mnot sure about having two 1" reducers on the T (or a 1" T) because 2x 1" pipe doesn't equal 1x 1.5" pipe.

I hope that all makes sense. I think I need to see more pics.

pmcadams
01/21/2010, 07:15 PM
OK, so run a 1" return line, unrestricted from the 1 inch reducer to your tank. On the other side of the T, no reducer. Run the full 1 1/2 inch pvc back to your sump. Put a gate valve on the 1 1/2 side that goes to the sump. If it's wide open, most of the water will go to the sump, but as you close down the sump return line the display tank return line pressure will increase. Just tune the valve to restrict the sump return flow until you are happy with the display tank return flow. 75 gallon is not tiny, that's a good size tank, but that pump is overkill :)

jupiter
01/21/2010, 08:03 PM
OK, so run a 1" return line, unrestricted from the 1 inch reducer to your tank. On the other side of the T, no reducer. Run the full 1 1/2 inch pvc back to your sump. Put a gate valve on the 1 1/2 side that goes to the sump. If it's wide open, most of the water will go to the sump, but as you close down the sump return line the display tank return line pressure will increase. Just tune the valve to restrict the sump return flow until you are happy with the display tank return flow. 75 gallon is not tiny, that's a good size tank, but that pump is overkill :)

Thanks Paul. Are you sure it wouldn't be better to keep the 1.5" return all the way up to the tank and reduce it there? I ask this because the tank has two 1" holes and a 1" return feeding two 1" holes might not give the full potential. Then again, the flow coming from one 1" return might be more than enough for that tank, it's just diverted through two largish holes.

One simple question. Should the water diverted to the sump go to the protein skimmer part of the sump, the overflow part, or to the pump feed part? Or maybe it doesn't matter.

Pump size = overkill for sure :rollface:
I'm also using a Vertex IN-250, lol

pmcadams
01/22/2010, 06:51 AM
Where you put the reducer becomes more of an issue as the line gets longer so it depends on how much pipe you run. Plus, since you are having to add in the flow relief to the sump, it matters even less. But if it's a concern, move the reducer closer to the tank, it's a simple change.

I would suggest the sump return be close to the sump pickup, not the skimmer. Try to avoid re-skimming the same water.