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View Full Version : Coral ID pics plus dying acropora


alzika
03/07/2010, 12:25 PM
Can anyone tell me what these corals are?

I think one of them is a bird's next, but it has a small white area where it is branching off and has no polyps there. Is this normal? Is this how the coral grows? Or something else?

Also, why is the acropora dying when the other corals seem fine?

http://cs.clemson.edu/~mboylen/unknown1.jpg
http://cs.clemson.edu/~mboylen/unknown2.jpg
http://cs.clemson.edu/~mboylen/dying_acropora.jpg
http://cs.clemson.edu/~mboylen/birds_nest.jpg

stingythingy45
03/07/2010, 01:06 PM
What lighting do you have?
How do you maintain water parameter?

alzika
03/07/2010, 09:15 PM
Bi-weekly 15% water changes with RO/DI water. I also test pH, calcium, alkalinity, etc. daily.

I have an ATI 4 bulb T5 lighting fixture. All of my other corals seem to be doing fine under it. The acropora was fine for a while, polyps coming out and everything. Now it is completely bleached.

Sisterlimonpot
03/07/2010, 09:20 PM
first one looks like a green slimer and the last one might be an ORA green birds nest.

alzika
03/07/2010, 09:41 PM
noooo. I accidentally just broke the bird's nest. Accidentally hit it with something while feeding it some oyster eggs. The part that I broke is still attached, but "flimsy". Will it heal up or will that part detach?

Sisterlimonpot
03/07/2010, 10:17 PM
Congrats you just fragged your first coral. seperate it fully and super glue the broken peice to something (preferably a frag plug) and it will sprout out and eventually become its own colony. the original frag will eventually heal and grow out.

alzika
03/08/2010, 12:50 AM
Congrats you just fragged your first coral. seperate it fully and super glue the broken peice to something (preferably a frag plug) and it will sprout out and eventually become its own colony. the original frag will eventually heal and grow out.

Can I glue it right next to the same coral?

IPowderBlueTang
03/08/2010, 02:46 AM
Yes you can.

alzika
03/09/2010, 01:22 PM
The first pic, the green coral, is dead today too. What is going on? I've had two acropora frags that have bleached. The new one effectively turned green to completely white within a period of 24 hours.

The bird's nest and larger acropora are going fine. I even have noticed decent growth out of the bird's nest since I bought it.

I tested alkalinity and calcium and the levels are fine. What could be causing the death of the corals? I have an ATI 4 bulb T5 fixture that runs for 10 hours a day.

Sugar Magnolia
03/09/2010, 01:31 PM
Congrats you just fragged your first coral.

Accidental fragging! :lol: I've done that many times.

alzika
03/09/2010, 07:59 PM
Still need help with the corals that are dying.

Grant W
03/09/2010, 10:22 PM
Do your water tests. How is your water quality,flow , etc

rbnice1
03/09/2010, 10:31 PM
Dont worry about pH.

What is your calc, alk, magnesium, nitrates, phosphates?

What is your flow in the tank? What powerheads, return, ect. What tank size?

What bulbs are you using in your light fixture?

blennydude
03/09/2010, 10:55 PM
Are the dying corals in a high flow area?

alzika
03/09/2010, 11:52 PM
Calcium and alk are within normal levels for SPS. Nitrates are effectively 0. I'm using 3 ATI bulbs and 1 coral life bulb in my light fixture. I have a vortech MP40w turned up to full blast and yes, the corals are both in high flow areas. I don't have a magnesium or phosphate test kit.

The vortech says it provides 3200 gph on full speed. The tank is 75 gallons.

w16227
03/10/2010, 09:05 AM
Calcium and alk are within normal levels for SPS. Nitrates are effectively 0. I'm using 3 ATI bulbs and 1 coral life bulb in my light fixture. I have a vortech MP40w turned up to full blast and yes, the corals are both in high flow areas. I don't have a magnesium or phosphate test kit.

The vortech says it provides 3200 gph on full speed. The tank is 75 gallons.


If you are goign to have SPS - you will need mag and phospate test kits.

Also, post the exact test numbers and what kits you used to test them. "Nitrates are effectively zero" can mean just about anything. My nitrates are 0-.2ppm with my salifert kit - effectively zero. Others may say that 1-2ppm is effectively zero. These are very different numbers. Same with the other values.

You say you test daily. This is overkill for most tanks - but good for your situation - as you can look for trends. Did anything shift/change in the time frame of the coral deaths?

How long were the corals in the tank? Did you acclimate them? Did you dip/treat before adding to your tank?

You say high flow - are the SPS right in front of the MP40? This is not always a good idea. SPS like high flow - but the powerheads should not be pointed directly at them. High fully developed flow is better.

w16227
03/10/2010, 09:07 AM
also - what other livestock (fish and corals) do you have and what filtration are you using. Do you run carbon?

alzika
03/13/2010, 08:28 PM
If you are goign to have SPS - you will need mag and phospate test kits.

Also, post the exact test numbers and what kits you used to test them. "Nitrates are effectively zero" can mean just about anything. My nitrates are 0-.2ppm with my salifert kit - effectively zero. Others may say that 1-2ppm is effectively zero. These are very different numbers. Same with the other values.

You say you test daily. This is overkill for most tanks - but good for your situation - as you can look for trends. Did anything shift/change in the time frame of the coral deaths?

How long were the corals in the tank? Did you acclimate them? Did you dip/treat before adding to your tank?

You say high flow - are the SPS right in front of the MP40? This is not always a good idea. SPS like high flow - but the powerheads should not be pointed directly at them. High fully developed flow is better.

I need to pick up a phosphate and magnesium test kit tomorrow. The test kits are API brand. After I test everytning, including salinity, I'll post the numbers back here.

The first dead acropora wasn't DIRECTLY in front of the vortech. It is nearly 1.35 feet away

My LFS said that the 2nd acropora died of rapid tissue necrosis. (the green color was peeling off and bleached in little a day

I also run carbon in my sump 24/7.

dudley moray
03/13/2010, 08:42 PM
how old is your tank?

stingythingy45
03/13/2010, 09:26 PM
Calcium and alk are within normal levels for SPS. Nitrates are effectively 0. I'm using 3 ATI bulbs and 1 coral life bulb in my light fixture. I have a vortech MP40w turned up to full blast and yes, the corals are both in high flow areas. I don't have a magnesium or phosphate test kit.

The vortech says it provides 3200 gph on full speed. The tank is 75 gallons.

And your calcium and alk are what???
Do you have test kits?

alzika
03/14/2010, 02:58 PM
The tank is relatively new, but completely cycled.

I'm using API test kits. For the calcium test, it is registering at 21 drops, which is 420. The alkalinity is 8 drops, however I don't know the exact alkalinity level of this. My fish store owner said it should be workin 7-10 drops.

The third acropora in the tank is still doing fine.

My LFS guy said that the other corals died from rapid tissue necrosis.

jason71832
03/14/2010, 04:28 PM
Your LFS guy is right. Acropora is one of the most challenging SPS....get you some montipora digitata and try your hand at it. All sorts of things can set off RTN, sudden big swings in salinity, ph, temp, alk, lighting, even flow sometimes. I like SPS alright, but this is one of the reasons I stay with my LPS.

irieef
03/14/2010, 08:06 PM
yes sps are one of the most challenging corals to keep, but also are one of the most rewarding..from the look of your lr in the pictures, your tank seems fairly new and nutrient rich, water is a little hazy also..if so, water params in newer tanks are unstable and tend to fluctuate..u should wait and save your $ until your tank is ready..patience is key..

alzika
03/15/2010, 07:43 AM
yes sps are one of the most challenging corals to keep, but also are one of the most rewarding..from the look of your lr in the pictures, your tank seems fairly new and nutrient rich, water is a little hazy also..if so, water params in newer tanks are unstable and tend to fluctuate..u should wait and save your $ until your tank is ready..patience is key..

No, the water isn't hazy. I just used my iPhone pic for closeups. Here's a full tank pic:

http://cs.clemson.edu/~mboylen/tank6.jpg

Two of the other corals are doing great. Another acropora and a bird's nest coral. The bird's nest is showing nice growth already.

alzika
03/15/2010, 07:50 AM
When I get a REAL camera (not an iPhone camera), you will see how clear the water is :)

Plus, there's literally no algae at all.

w16227
03/15/2010, 09:11 AM
What the LFS told you is probably true--- RTN happened, but the key is finding out how.

SPS dislike change - and in a young tank, change happens.

There also could be a predator --- maybe a bad crab or your coral beauty (they are usually ok, but can nip).

I would slow down with any new SPS additions until the tank is at least 6 months old. Otherwise, you may just have more mystery losses and the $$$ will add up. My birdsnest has been one of the hardier SPS in the tank - surviving many issues (temp probe failure, kalk reactor issue) - so that one may pull through. The others? hard to say.

Did you dip or treat them in any way before adding to the tank? Corals can carry parasites and diseases similar to fish. QT is not a necessity, but a good dip will prevent a new addition from taking out other livestock.

good luck

Muddy35
03/15/2010, 11:56 AM
Just my 2 cents-

You still haven't said how long your tanks been set up. How long has it had water in it?
Looking at the pic of your tank and it being relatively new I'm gonna bet your tank isn't even cycled. Theres nothing on the glass, sand, rocks indicating that it's completed a cycle unless your immaculate at cleaning everything.
You say your testing but you don't know exactly how to read the tests? How are you sure that your testing correctly then? You need to have you LFS show you exactly how to test and read those test kits- to me right now your wasting your money testing and have no idea what your tests are telling you.
What top off water are you using?
How often are you doing water changes?

When posting a reply about water parameters you really need to know what the numbers are for ppl to be able to diagnose what the problems are.

PH-
ALK-
CA-
PO4-
MAG-
TEMP-

those would be a start but there are a lot of others that woud be very beneficial as well.

I would forgo ALL sps until you understand whats going on in the tank and have a basic understanding of how each of the different properties affect each other-ie.. calcium- ph- alk- ect..

Its good that your asking questions and you have a good looking tank but take it slow- Acros are very difficult- IF you insist on corals right now the start with a couple LPS or softies as these are alot more forgiving to start with. If you insist on sps then start with some of the montiporas ie.. Digi's imo are a few of the easy ones to start with and will handle
fluctuations alot better.

Take it slow and ask alot of questions-

alzika
03/15/2010, 04:02 PM
Just my 2 cents-

You still haven't said how long your tanks been set up. How long has it had water in it?
Looking at the pic of your tank and it being relatively new I'm gonna bet your tank isn't even cycled. Theres nothing on the glass, sand, rocks indicating that it's completed a cycle unless your immaculate at cleaning everything.
You say your testing but you don't know exactly how to read the tests? How are you sure that your testing correctly then? You need to have you LFS show you exactly how to test and read those test kits- to me right now your wasting your money testing and have no idea what your tests are telling you.
What top off water are you using?
How often are you doing water changes?

When posting a reply about water parameters you really need to know what the numbers are for ppl to be able to diagnose what the problems are.

PH-
ALK-
CA-
PO4-
MAG-
TEMP-

those would be a start but there are a lot of others that woud be very beneficial as well.

I would forgo ALL sps until you understand whats going on in the tank and have a basic understanding of how each of the different properties affect each other-ie.. calcium- ph- alk- ect..

Its good that your asking questions and you have a good looking tank but take it slow- Acros are very difficult- IF you insist on corals right now the start with a couple LPS or softies as these are alot more forgiving to start with. If you insist on sps then start with some of the montiporas ie.. Digi's imo are a few of the easy ones to start with and will handle
fluctuations alot better.

Take it slow and ask alot of questions-

Dude, my tank has been cycled for months. My snails did a HUGE job at cleaning all the green algae off of the sides and back of my glass.

I've had 3 different saltwater tanks so I know when a cycle is done. If it wasn't cycled, NO WAY would I have the livestock in there that I have.

I didn't dip the corals, but will do so next time. There's a 3rd acropora in the tank doing just fine! Growing, even.

I'm going to wait another 4 months before adding any more corals, just to be safe.

alzika
03/15/2010, 04:05 PM
What the LFS told you is probably true--- RTN happened, but the key is finding out how.

SPS dislike change - and in a young tank, change happens.

There also could be a predator --- maybe a bad crab or your coral beauty (they are usually ok, but can nip).

I would slow down with any new SPS additions until the tank is at least 6 months old. Otherwise, you may just have more mystery losses and the $$$ will add up. My birdsnest has been one of the hardier SPS in the tank - surviving many issues (temp probe failure, kalk reactor issue) - so that one may pull through. The others? hard to say.

Did you dip or treat them in any way before adding to the tank? Corals can carry parasites and diseases similar to fish. QT is not a necessity, but a good dip will prevent a new addition from taking out other livestock.

good luck

Actually, it's a potters angel, not a coral beauty :)

dudley moray
03/15/2010, 04:09 PM
[QUOTE=alzika;16767259]The tank is relatively new, but completely cycled.

well this is most likely your problem you should wait about 8-12 months before introducing acropora sp into your new tank. your tank will go through many different cycles before it can sustain sps ! don't get frustrated just take it slowly, many acros are hardier or more fragile then the next use these loses as a learning experience , patience is the key to success with sps and stability but the two go hand in hand .someone once told me when i first got bit by the acro bug to wait until your growing quarter size spots of coralline on your glass that's how you'll know it's ok to add sps

alzika
03/15/2010, 05:20 PM
[QUOTE=alzika;16767259]The tank is relatively new, but completely cycled.

well this is most likely your problem you should wait about 8-12 months before introducing acropora sp into your new tank. your tank will go through many different cycles before it can sustain sps ! don't get frustrated just take it slowly, many acros are hardier or more fragile then the next use these loses as a learning experience , patience is the key to success with sps and stability but the two go hand in hand .someone once told me when i first got bit by the acro bug to wait until your growing quarter size spots of coralline on your glass that's how you'll know it's ok to add sps


OK, thanks. I'll wait until I see those spots on the back of the tank.