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chefjbs
03/11/2010, 11:04 PM
Hello,

I had a question about the 8800 pump and the BFS-215 Pressure switch. I am running a 5 stage ro/di unit that is rated at 75 gpd. Where would i actually install the Pressure switch. I am not using a pressure tank for ro water and i am not using a float valve for my reservoir. I do have John guest valves ball valves at the ends of my water outlets. Well actually i have three. On on the end of the Ro Water line, one on the end of the ro/di water line, and one after the John guest tee going to the DI. My thought was that i would save my DI resin from being diminished while i was making Ro water. (does any of this make any sense??

So now where would i put the pressure switch? If i was to keep the water on and shut off the John Guest Valves would that create enough pressure to shut off the 8800 pump? or will my ro/unit explode? As of now i am shutting the off the pump and then the main water line manually. The pressure switch would probably save me like 30 seconds of work, but since i already have it why not use it.

Also why is it when i plumb up the pump my pressure gauge goes crazy. I can't get a straight reading. the first time installed the pump i didn't adjust the pressure and the pressure gauge went haywire, now i have it toned down to where i shakes between 75-80 psi... do i need a better quality pressure gauge? I think the one i have is the plain value type of gauge, maybe i need one of those ones filled with liquid? any advice would help.

thanks a million.

Joe

Buckeye Hydro
03/12/2010, 03:33 AM
Hi Joe.

Your pressure switch could be placed in a number of locations. You didn't mention having any check valves anywhere in the system. Hopefully your vendor installed a check valve in the permeate port of the RO membrane housing. So because all of the tubing past that point is open and connected, you could put the pressure switch anywhere that is convenient past (downstream) of that check valve.

You should have your pump adjusted so that it delivers no more than 90 psi. Given that, there should be no risk of it over pressurizing your system. Even if you didn't adjust the pump and let it pressurize the system to its max, the chances of a catestrophic failure of your system due to pressure would be low - but don't go there - adjust it to no more than 90 psi.

Can you tell me a little more about what happens with your pressure gauge - what do you mean by "it went haywire?" We do recommend a liquid filled pressure gauge on systems with a booster pump to help dampen the vibration of the needle. That needle should not be vibrating as you describe - it probably won't last long if it does.

Russ

Buckeye Hydro
03/12/2010, 03:35 AM
double post

chefjbs
03/12/2010, 11:49 PM
well when i say haywire i meant it was vibrating like crazy, i adjusted it down to 80 psi (before i got the pump i was only getting 35 maybe 40 on a good day).

i had a question about your pressure gauges, are the connections on the back of the gauge or on the bottom? Not that it matters, but i wold just like to replace the gauge i have and have it seated in the same place. The gauge i have now has the connection in the back. I actually drilled a hole in the metal bracket that holds the filters so that it can hold the gauge so it can easily be seen.

Thanks for the quick reply.

Joe

Buckeye Hydro
03/13/2010, 03:54 AM
The dry gauge has 1/8" threads center back.

The liquid filled gauge has 1/4" threads center back.

We have female fittings that go from these threads to 1/4" tubing.

Russ

Buckeye Hydro
03/13/2010, 03:55 AM
The dry gauge has 1/8" threads center back.

The liquid filled gauge has 1/4" threads center back.

We have female fittings that go from these threads to 1/4" tubing.

Russ

Buckeye Hydro
03/13/2010, 03:56 AM
The dry gauge has 1/8" threads center back.

The liquid filled gauge has 1/4" threads center back.

We have female fittings that go from these threads to 1/4" tubing.

Russ

Buckeye Hydro
03/13/2010, 04:59 AM
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