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reef_doug
06/26/2010, 12:52 PM
The in the ZEOvit world Potassium depletion is a concern due to the increased microbial activity, and dosing K is usually recommended.

Will Potassium depletion also be a concern when using Bio Pellets?

bluereefs
06/26/2010, 01:38 PM
IIRC potassium depletion come from zeolite stone, if you do not use zeolite stone there are no pottasium depletion, I dont think potassium depletion are related with microbial activity.

reef_doug
06/26/2010, 01:42 PM
IIRC potassium depletion come from zeolite stone, if you do not use zeolite stone there are no pottasium depletion, I dont think potassium depletion are related with microbial activity.

But all living cells use potassium. Would this include bacteria though?

bluereefs
06/26/2010, 01:56 PM
I really dont know, most of the reefers do not dose potassium and have very sucesfull aquariums so IMO is not needed, only information regarding potassium deficiency come from zeo user what is normal becuse zeolit binds potassium.
Maybe some of the chemistry/biology experts will chime in this thread and provide better explanation/information.

Boomer
06/26/2010, 02:56 PM
I agree with Blue. However, the concern for some, is the claim, that K+ help brighten up colors. You should try to keep it at NSW levels if possible.

The roles and regulation of potassium in bacteria.


Potassium is the major intracellular cation in bacteria as well as in eucaryotic cells. Bacteria accumulate K+ by a number of different transport systems that vary in kinetics, energy coupling, and regulation. The Trk and Kdp systems of enteric organisms have been well studied and are found in many distantly related species. The Ktr system, resembling Trk in many ways, is also found in many bacteria. In most species two or more independent saturable K(+)-transport systems are present. The KefB and KefC type of system that is activated by treatment of cells with toxic electrophiles is the only specific K(+)-efflux system that has been well characterized. Pressure-activated channels of at least three types are found in bacteria; these represent nonspecific paths of efflux when turgor pressure is dangerously high. A close homolog of eucaryotic K+ channels is found in many bacteria, but its role remains obscure. K+ transporters are regulated both by ion concentrations and turgor. A very general property is activation of K+ uptake by an increase in medium osmolarity. This response is modulated by both internal and external concentrations of K+. Kdp is the only K(+)-transport system whose expression is regulated by environmental conditions. Decrease in turgor pressure and/or reduction in external K+ rapidly increase expression of Kdp. The signal created by these changes, inferred to be reduced turgor, is transmitted by the KdpD sensor kinase to the KdpE-response regulator that in turn stimulates transcription of the kdp genes. K+ acts as a cytoplasmic-signaling molecule, activating and/or inducing enzymes and transport systems that allow the cell to adapt to elevated osmolarity. The signal could be ionic strength or specifically K+. This signaling response is probably mediated by a direct sensing of internal ionic strength by each particular system and not by a component or system that coordinates this response by different systems to elevated K+.