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luconi
08/05/2010, 08:25 AM
I have soft corals and I think I want to try an lps coral. I know calcium, ph, and alkalinity should be maintained. What are the best ranges of these levels? Can ph be at 7.8 (I know not lower though)? Also, are LPS corals more sensitive to nitrates (which I have at about 5-10). I know nitrite and ammonia should be at 0. The lighting I have is fine I think for most LPS. Is there anything I'm missing and really need to do in order to keep LPS corals? Thanks!

shifty51008
08/05/2010, 08:30 AM
taken from frick n frags a few post down with the same title

they like good water, just like any other stony coral.

that being said, many LPS come from lagoon and other less-than-pristine reef areas.
they can take more extremes of siltation, low light, being around softies, low flows and other things Acros dont have to put up with.

they all filterfeed, but some of the bigger ones can be fed chunks of stuff to make them grow faster if you want.

additional dosing just for them is not necessary. they need good alk/ca/mg to buiild skeletons like the other stonies. waterchanges will keep all the traces in line...

jefathome
08/05/2010, 08:33 AM
7.8 should be fine as long as it is kinda stable. 5-10 Nitrates should be ok as well. I'd start off with some of the easier LPS's like frogspawns, Bubble corals, Torch, galaxy, anchors.

Some of the tougher LPS's are:
Blastomussa
Acan
Chalice

luconi
08/05/2010, 06:19 PM
Should I test for magnesium and calcium if I only add one lps coral to begin with? Would enough of the ca and mg be added through a water change every 2-2 1/2 weeks? I had a duncan once and for some reason it closed up after a while of appearing healthy, and eventually seemed to just melt. I wasn't testing for ca and mg and nitrates were probably around 15-20 at the time. Any reason for this? Could it have been the coral beauty I USED to have? Thanks very much in advance for answers!

luconi
08/05/2010, 09:29 PM
BUMP

(oh and for the post before this: I do about 25% water change every 2-2 1/2 weeks usually).

divewsharks
08/05/2010, 10:02 PM
Were you feeding your duncan?
You won't know consumption of ca/alk/mg unless you get good test kits. Every salt has different amounts of each.

luconi
08/05/2010, 10:04 PM
I was feeding the duncan. I think it was every day even...mysis shrimp. Maybe I overfed?
I can get some test kits too before I get another lps.

Frick-n-Frags
08/06/2010, 01:41 AM
heh, this thread freaked me out for a second :D

luconi
08/06/2010, 11:21 AM
heh, this thread freaked me out for a second :D

How?


(anybody else: check my post before this one please)

Ston3
08/06/2010, 12:21 PM
From my experience, alot of lps are relatively forgiving. My Duncan was one of my first corals ever and it's still going strong. The coral beauty could have done the damage, but then again, there could be a variety of other causes for the demise of your Duncan. Another possibility is you overfed and polluted your water.

luconi
08/06/2010, 01:57 PM
Ok, well maybe after a while I'll get another lps.. For now my goal is getting a sixline wrasse.

blasterman789
08/06/2010, 02:05 PM
I'd start off with some of the easier LPS's like frogspawns, Bubble corals, Torch, galaxy, anchors.


*I* tend to disagree. My experience has been that Euphyllia species like the Frogspawn, Torch and Hammer tend to be among the more finicky of LPS and a bit dicey as a beginner LPS. I've found galaxy's to be touchy as well.

I've found that any LPS that doesn't have a lot of polyp extension and grows close to it's skeleton is darn near indestructable. Candy Canes for instance are almost impossible to kill, and Acans are also very tough.

Any LPS with large or very extended polyps is going to be sensitive to water params.

Unlike SPS, LPS do tend to thrive under higher nutrient levels and some extra nitrate helps.

Should I test for magnesium and calcium if I only add one lps coral to begin with?

Adequate water changes should supply enough CA and Mag for LPS to grow fine. While it's never a bad thing to watch CA, unless you have a lot of LPS they just won't deplete CA that much. Even if your CA level is very low, it will just slow skeleton growth. The polyps will just grow fatter and closer together.

luconi
08/06/2010, 06:23 PM
*I* tend to disagree. My experience has been that Euphyllia species like the Frogspawn, Torch and Hammer tend to be among the more finicky of LPS and a bit dicey as a beginner LPS. I've found galaxy's to be touchy as well.

I've found that any LPS that doesn't have a lot of polyp extension and grows close to it's skeleton is darn near indestructable. Candy Canes for instance are almost impossible to kill, and Acans are also very tough.

Any LPS with large or very extended polyps is going to be sensitive to water params.

Unlike SPS, LPS do tend to thrive under higher nutrient levels and some extra nitrate helps.



Adequate water changes should supply enough CA and Mag for LPS to grow fine. While it's never a bad thing to watch CA, unless you have a lot of LPS they just won't deplete CA that much. Even if your CA level is very low, it will just slow skeleton growth. The polyps will just grow fatter and closer together.


Thank you very much! I might get a test kit for CA just to make sure it stays in the right range, and I might soon start looking for an LPS to add to my tank. Maybe I'll look for a candy cane or an acan... Thanks again!
Before I get another coral, though, I think I'm going to get a sixline wrasse in order to eat any things that need to be eaten.