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View Full Version : EB8 and GFCI


Hawkdl2
09/22/2010, 08:24 AM
I've been doing some reading on ground faults and came across a post that suggested the EB8 (and I suppose DC8) act as GFCI. I know they have overload protection, but will they also detect and trip on a ground fault?

kenargo
09/22/2010, 09:50 AM
There is no GFCI protection built into the devices you mention that I have ever heard of.

Gordonious
09/22/2010, 10:50 AM
Is it recommended they be plugged into an GFCI or is this a bad idea?

RussM
09/22/2010, 11:16 AM
Is it recommended they be plugged into an GFCI or is this a bad idea?*Everything* running on house electricity in and around a tank should be protected by GFCI.

In order of preference (most to least)


GFCI breaker (circuit breaker with GFCI)
GFCI receptacle (wall outlet)
portable GFCI (i.e. GFCI built into a heavy-duty extension cord or power strip)
no GFCI

Gordonious
09/22/2010, 12:36 PM
Here is an odd ball question. What if you are using a generator? I bought a portable GFCI when I picked up heavy duty extensions for my portable generator. Wasn't sure if it was a good idea or not.

RussM
09/22/2010, 12:45 PM
Here is an odd ball question. What if you are using a generator? I bought a portable GFCI when I picked up heavy duty extensions for my portable generator. Wasn't sure if it was a good idea or not.It's definitely better than nothing ;)

Hawkdl2
09/22/2010, 12:47 PM
There is no GFCI protection built into the devices you mention that I have ever heard of.


I didn't think so either and mine are plugged into GFCI outlets.

I hadn't thought of a GFCI breaker as Russ suggested. I had two dedicated 20 amp lines ran from the panel for the tank, so I suppose it would make sense for me to upgrade their breakers to GFCI too.

dbdisok
10/01/2010, 10:37 PM
Hawkdl2 read up on the GFCI breaker plus a GFCI oulet. Seems to me that I read that it is either one or the other. With both you may end up with the outlet tripping.

I am not an electrician so check up on what I just posted.

wwanthony
10/01/2010, 10:54 PM
*Everything* running on house electricity in and around a tank should be protected by GFCI.

In order of preference (most to least)


GFCI breaker (circuit breaker with GFCI)
GFCI receptacle (wall outlet)
portable GFCI (i.e. GFCI built into a heavy-duty extension cord or power strip)
no GFCI


No. 4 is not an option (preference) and should not be listed. Anything connected to a tank must be connected to some sort of GFCI. Period.

schwaggs
10/02/2010, 05:58 PM
I had two dedicated 20 amp lines ran from the panel for the tank, so I suppose it would make sense for me to upgrade their breakers to GFCI too.

I have my fish room circuits setup this way and you might not want to do it this way. If I had it to do all over again, I would put multiple GFCI outlets around the room running to the single, standard breaker. This way, a failing item (heater, powerhead, etc) won't knock out the entire circuit, it will only trip the local GFCI outlet.

Gordonious
10/02/2010, 06:49 PM
No reason you couldn't do both now right? I mean the outlets aren't too difficult to replace yourself if you have experience doing so. I wouldn't touch the breaker box myself with out a trained electrician present. If all your outlets are GFI a GFI breaker should never trip as it would be cut off before each reaches back that far right?

I AM NOT ELECTRICIAN at all, just my opinion.

RussM
10/02/2010, 07:51 PM
According to a EE I know and asked about this a while back, multiple RCDs/GFCIs on a given circuit are not recommended. Two on one circuit is usually fine, but each additional GFCI further increases the likelihood of nuisance trips. And it's not a linear increase... he says it's exponential.

Gordonious
10/03/2010, 12:02 AM
Ah! Good to know. Thanks Russ!