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View Full Version : Problem Algae Gone For Good?


Tradewinds
01/02/2011, 01:38 PM
Problem algae seems to be a pretty common topic for many of the threads here.

Is it possible to beat problem algae for good? What's the longest period of time anyone has gone without encountering hair algae, bubble algae or other types of problematic algae in their tanks?

It would be nice to know, especially for those new to the hobby, that this is a battle that can be won.

syrinx
01/02/2011, 02:05 PM
There will always be the phases of agae that use up the excesses of elements and waste in the starting of a new tank. After that many tanks never experience algae problems. These are usually the tanks of experienced aquarists that have discovered how to keep a system balanced and nutrient poor. Yes even these tanks will pull in a bit of valonia or other nuisence algae- but it doesn`t become a problem due to the overall quality of the setup. Thats not to say some old times don`t get hit with the algae stick once in a while- but it is natural that there would be more posts on the subject by people just starting out. I have tanks ranging from 4 years or so to 20 years- and none of them have algae problems- algaes-yes- problems no.

cubsFAN
01/02/2011, 02:09 PM
Well put Syrinx.

cubsFAN
01/02/2011, 02:10 PM
none of them have algae problems- algaes-yes- problems no.

My favorite part.

dzfish17
01/02/2011, 03:31 PM
Thats exactly right that every tank will have algae. It just depends on what type of algae. Most new tanks (if maintained correctly) will see nuisance algae disappear within a 6-12 mo. period.

Frogmanx82
01/02/2011, 03:35 PM
Thats exactly right that every tank will have algae. It just depends on what type of algae. Most new tanks (if maintained correctly) will see nuisance algae disappear within a 6-12 mo. period.

If maintained correctly. Yep that one qualifier is where all the discussion centers around. For those that achieve it, it seems natural and easy. Others scream in frustration as that correct balance seems unattainable.

Angel*Fish
01/02/2011, 04:15 PM
There are die off issues in the first year. But your tank does not have to be nutrient poor to be free of bubble algae, hair algae and bryopsis. You see so many threads with hobbyists wanting to rid their aquariums of all the beneficial life (usually worms) needed to keep things in balance. Or they've added creatures (fish, crabs) that decimate these populations and then they wonder why their tank hasn't reached an equilibrium. It's often the people who are in the biggest hurry to have things the "cleanest" who are going to have problems. For example if you have a huge feather duster bloom in your tank and suddenly yank them all out, something else is going grow to pick up those nutrients.

Angel*Fish
01/02/2011, 04:25 PM
And I have to add one of my pet peeves is the proverbial "clean up crew". I have never bought a CUC in my life. If there are some creatures you think need seeding in your tank, by all means get them. Or a few certain snails. But CUC is just a marketing term and you need to know exactly what you're putting in your tank. Personally, I wouldn't put any sort of hermit crab in tank if personally called me on the phone to assure me it's committed to its vegetarian ways. Protect your pods and worms and your tank will be better for it.

mscarpena
01/02/2011, 04:27 PM
Just watch your nutrient load and keep up on your maintenance and you should be fine. I have never had an algae outbreak in 8 years

scuba guy ron
01/02/2011, 04:50 PM
There will always be an algae challenge as stated above its up to you to not let it get to be a problem. I have battled just about every one. the only time I considered it a problem was when I first started reefkeeping and was uneducated on the subject. My reef is 5 yrs old and my current challenge is a form of Udotea. At least there is always somthing to challenge you in his hobby.