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View Full Version : Anything comparable to the Mean well HLG 185H-48b drivers


nanotank
01/27/2011, 03:04 PM
I have called everywhere and no one can tell me if and when these r even coming in the states. Most say 12-14 weeks at the earliest if they get them at all. So these being recommended is really kind of useless at this point. 2 of the largest distributors both told me today they would be special order items and not sure when they would even be here. So my question is, is there a comparable driver for 0-10v with PWM that will do what these do. I am about the say the heck with it and go MW 48d's and just stagger the start with my profilux. I even think I could use the p series now with the led control 4 pwm card being released by GHL in a few weeks or so.. If I went that route how could I get the most out of these drivers without having 1 per every 12 leds on a 204 led setup requiring 17 drivers? I have everything but drivers and not sure I can wait 3-4 months as by then there will prob be a new and better led and then I will have to get back into my pocket.

firechild
01/27/2011, 03:15 PM
You could run 24-26 emitters on a single ELN-60-48 if you run 2 parallel strings. By turning up the current you can get 1300-1400mA from the driver allowing you to get 2 strings of 650-700mA.

nanotank
01/27/2011, 03:22 PM
if I ran 26 per I could go with 8 drivers. I think that will be fine as I will have 4 different colors coming on at 4 diff times. It will be set up for storms, cloud cover and lightning and sunrise, sunset... Might have to sell the couple d's I have and go with the p's to take full adv of the PWM card from GHL...

nanotank
01/27/2011, 05:06 PM
The p's only hit 1300 mA so 650 max is all I could get at 24-26 LEDs in paralell. I think that would really be a waste to do that. I am wanting 750-800 mA for my 240 since 2/3 of them are xr-e's and the rest xp-e So anymore options that are dimmable from 0-100% with pwm? Damn what a pita. I do not want to have to run 15 or so of these with 13-14 LEDs per driver but might have too.

firechild
01/27/2011, 05:17 PM
If you're open to 1-10V dimming (since you already have the profilux) then the Thomas Research drivers could be an option. They run higher voltages which have the benefit of much longer strings at higher current but also the problem of dealing with higher DC voltages which require far more care. Nanotuners have just released them and the largest model will run about 50 emitters at 1050mA.

nanotank
01/27/2011, 05:23 PM
For advanced control with the new pwm module from ghl I really need pwm dimmable drivers now not 1-10v. D those only do 1-10v or pwm also?

firechild
01/27/2011, 05:30 PM
They are only available in 1-10V so far, not sure if that will change in the future.

nanotank
01/27/2011, 05:32 PM
Dang..... This is looking grim right now....

nanotank
01/28/2011, 08:01 AM
I take no responses means no other drivers will work huh

widmer
01/28/2011, 08:17 AM
If you're open to 1-10V dimming (since you already have the profilux) then the Thomas Research drivers could be an option. They run higher voltages which have the benefit of much longer strings at higher current but also the problem of dealing with higher DC voltages which require far more care. Nanotuners have just released them and the largest model will run about 50 emitters at 1050mA.

More like ~30-32. It would take a voltage of ~175 V to run 50 LEDs at an average of 3.5V

Meanwells are still a much better deal not to mention less risk of shorting...

nanotank
01/28/2011, 09:15 AM
The thing I am worried about since no one can say 100% for sure when these will be here is waiting and then it not happening or being 6 months down the road. I am re building a 240 from the ground up and I just do not have time to wait 3,4 heck maybe 5-6 months for these drivers. Very tempted to just try the P series and get about 17 of these suckers.

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 10:26 AM
I am doing a prototype build for a 210 gallon tank. I am using two Thomas Research TRC-200S105DT 90-305 VAC 114-190 VDC 1050 mA 200W. For larger builds these drivers make the most sense but you do need to meet the minimum voltage requirements to start the driver. In this case it's about 21 lights (half the maximum voltage) and by the way, all the specs I see on the CREE's have them rated at 3.7 volts. Of course this isn't a problem on this size build.

The 1050mA does not bother me because the additional 50mA is well within the published tolerance range for the CREE LED's. As far as I can tell these drivers are an excellent choice over so many MW drivers. They are 0-10V dimmable and the build tolerances are very tight. They have a 300,000 Hour @ 25C, 80% Load, 110 VAC on 1050 mA MTBF.

There is one drawback however, they are very difficult to buy. You can try to find a distributor in your area, I had no luck. I am guessing the majority of their business is shipping to OEM's for speciality lighting applications. Nanotuners doesn't list the 200W version which I wanted. To purchase through Thomas Research you need a resale tax certificate for your company, which I did have. They don't sell direct to the public. So I purchased them through my company and resold them to myself (tax included this time of course, wouldn't want to cheat NJ out of their few dollars). On the bright side they are very inexpensive compared to the number of MW's I would need and their cost, not to mention the crazy mess of wires and plugs. The price direct from TR is also cheaper than the Nanotuner's price, obviously.

Here is a link to the data sheet if your interested. I see no reason at all why these won't work very elegantly. http://www.thomasresearchproducts.com/2010Datasheets/TRC200DimmingSeries09-06-10.pdf

nanotank
01/28/2011, 10:36 AM
I need PWM dimming control.. The TR drivers were mentioned to me above but they are not PWM dimmable. To take full adv of the GHL pwm led card coming out I need that. I can do 1-10v but that really limits what you can do as far as lightening and cloud cover and full simulation. If they had PWM I would be all over them.

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 10:46 AM
I struggled with my decision to go with 1-10V control but in the end I decided there wasn't anything, really necessary IMO, that I couldn't do with 1-10V control and my Apex. I am pretty convinced that I can simulate more than I need with the Apex. After all, a thunderstorm might be really cool but a more elegantly designed lighting fixture and the prospect of not freaking out my fish sounded more attractive to me. By varying the blue/white and intensity mixing I can get some pretty cool lighting effects.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 10:50 AM
The fish do not freak out in the lightening at least the ones in my 60 cube don't. I have 2 AI fixtures off a profilux here at my office since last march and no problems. Its VERY cool for sure and on my 240 at home I want that feature. So looks like I am in holding pattern for the HLG or try and go crazy and go with a bunch of eln p's... I tried to call TR but never got an answer. Wanted to see if they had any PWM dimmable drivers.

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 11:00 AM
Wanted to see if they had any PWM dimmable drivers.

They don't. Good luck.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 11:05 AM
Dang.. Wish I could just order the HLG series direct from China or wherever they r made.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 11:09 AM
Wishing now I would have just dropped the 4G's and got 8 of the sol blue AI fixtures. Might just have to sell everything and go that route but I am sure i wold lose my butt if I did...

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 11:11 AM
You gave me some insight and after looking around a bit it seems like I will be able to simulate lightening effects with my Apex. I am going to have to looke around more on how exactly to program this. I already know I can easily accomplish sunrise and sunset along with cloud cover. Thanks, this might be fun.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 11:15 AM
Its def very cool. The problem I have been told with the 1-10V is it does not switch fast enough to achieve the lightening effect on the profilux. This may be different for the apex. If it is DEF let me know I might just sell one of my profilux and get an apex and be done with this. Do the TR allow dimming from 0-100% that's a limiting factor on many drivers also...

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 11:33 AM
I have been debating this with a friend who claims the best way to simulate lightening with the apex and 0-10 volt control is to set the blue low to simulate heavy thunder storm clouds, turn off the driver for the whites. Set the intensity voltatage to around 8 on the whites then use the apex programming to turn the . He claims it's very realistic, I have not seen it but I am going to try it for sure.

The TR's allow dimming from 10 to 100%. I figured at 10% the next step would probably be turning off the driver and shutting down white or blue all together. Which is what I plan to do for total darkness anyway. I have seen other drivers but their dimming range is very poor, some were as high as 50%.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 11:47 AM
Ok just got confirmation. If I buy 3 HLG 185h-48b I am looking at 3-6 months lead time. ***.......

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 12:59 PM
I just got a call from TR telling me that if I wanted the 200W 1050mA supplies it would be a 6 week turnaround. Instead I ordered the 700mA drivers off the shelf in stock. Additionally, I purchased an extra one because I just re-designed my light fixture to include a third string with a series of 12 High Intensity LED Arrays so I can also simulate high noon lighting and further enhance my ability to simulate different lighting conditions. So it worked to my advantage.

nanotank
01/28/2011, 01:13 PM
what leds are you using in this build? What bin?

nanotank
01/28/2011, 01:16 PM
Ok so if I went with these drivers I could do everything except the lightening storms with the 1-10v? These go down to 10% dimming also correct not lower?

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 02:50 PM
Ok, as you know already I selected the drivers and they are on the way. The LED's I am getting are:

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/cree-xr-e-q5-emitter-on-premium-star-228lm-at-1a-2394

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/cree-xr-e-r2-wg-emitter-on-premium-star-15943

And

I have not selected a series of very high intensity LED's, high power to ramp up and simulate high noon. Still looking for these.

Heat Sink: (pretty sure I have decided on this size)

http://www.heatsinkusa.com/storename/heatsinkusa/dept/272034/ItemDetail-10714632.aspx

On the drivers, I guess it depends on your controller. I have been told you can simulate lightning. Again, I have not yet tried it. At least I know on the Apex there are "Ramp" routines to simulate sunrise/sunset and different weather patterns.

According to the specifications published on the drivers they are rated from 10% to 100%. No indication they go any lower.

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 02:58 PM
This is the LED I am leaning towards for the high noon high intensity lighting.

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/cree-xlamp-mc-e-k0-wg-370-700-lumen-led-emitter-on-20mm-star-board-mce-wg-k0-16145

I may drive this one with the MW driver since I will only use 12 total for three lighting segments.

firechild
01/28/2011, 03:55 PM
This is the LED I am leaning towards for the high noon high intensity lighting.

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/cree-xlamp-mc-e-k0-wg-370-700-lumen-led-emitter-on-20mm-star-board-mce-wg-k0-16145

I may drive this one with the MW driver since I will only use 12 total for three lighting segments.

You'd be better off going with XM-L emitters rather than MC-E. They are cheaper and much more efficient. They can be run at up to 3000mA with a forward voltage of only 3.3V.

firechild
01/28/2011, 03:57 PM
More like ~30-32. It would take a voltage of ~175 V to run 50 LEDs at an average of 3.5V

Meanwells are still a much better deal not to mention less risk of shorting...

Sorry, you're right, I meant 700mA, not 1050mA. They are 171V which would do just over 50 emitters at 3.3V.

nuclearheli
01/28/2011, 05:09 PM
You'd be better off going with XM-L emitters rather than MC-E. They are cheaper and much more efficient. They can be run at up to 3000mA with a forward voltage of only 3.3V.

I am going to look at this, thank you.

der_wille_zur_macht
01/29/2011, 05:37 AM
I hope you guys are expert assemblers. Drivers producing DC voltages in the ranges you're talking about are DEADLY dangerous. If you short a 48v driver and it shocks you, it'll hurt but no harm done. If you short a 120V DC driver, it could kill you. And, if you've read through build threads on here, you'll recognize that an alarmingly high percentage of people are finding at least one short on their array the first time they power it up. IMHO this is a clear advantage of high-current drivers running parallel strings over the high-voltage drivers you guys are talking about.

Search around in the various LED threads, I know at least one or two people have found good sources for the big Meanwell drivers, so you may be able to work with the vendor they used. There are even pictures of these drivers in one of the threads - just can't remember which one.

nuclearheli
01/29/2011, 07:01 AM
Understood, thanks for the warning. Your right, you must be very careful working with these drivers. I would never power up one of these drivers without extensive testing of the assembly and without PC. The bottom line is you should never find a short powering a device up unless the short happens between the time you finished your testing and you apply current. There are much easier ways to find shorts before applying any current.

Everyone needs to remember not to get comfortable with these things, low or high voltage. At the currents they run even at lower voltages fibrilation can still occur and cause death. Your not safe at 48 volts either but in the spirit of your comment, your at higher risk at higher voltages.

nanotank
01/29/2011, 09:09 AM
I have decided to go with the eln p or the Hlg. Now it's just a matter of how long I can wait. Thinking of just getting the eln's and running them in 2 parallel strings of 12-13 per string. Would running the emitters at 650 mA be a waste or not? What mA do most of you run your emitters at?

nuclearheli
01/29/2011, 10:45 AM
From what I have seen and read on the forums 700 seems to be the sweet spot.

kcress
01/29/2011, 01:18 PM
650mA is just fine. It means your LEDs, while putting out just a wee bit less than they would at 700mA, will be running more efficiently.


On the general subject of shorts:

If builders would slow down and test from LED to heatsink on the last LED they soldered in, on EVERY LED they solder in, they would see any short the minute they caused it! That would allow you discover the short and fix it easily/immediately. This is instead of building the whole string and then not knowing where the short is or finding it only after power-ON. It takes a little, longer when building the stings, to put down the soldering iron and pick up the meter test probes and probe one point, but it would pay major time dividends over the bigger hunt and possibly prevent some toasted LEDs or perhaps a pesky electrocution.

MosMike
01/30/2011, 05:54 AM
Understood, thanks for the warning. Your right, you must be very careful working with these drivers.
People forget 1 important thing: wiring those 200W drivers to stars SHOULD NOT BE DONE.

After a hint from der_wille_zur_macht I had a look at a thing called "Creepage clearance". This is the minimum safe distance between 2 bare wires at a given voltage. The traditional LED stars do not satisfy those requirements!

Even with 50V drivers if you solder the wires too close to the edge you are violating those safety requirements.

Also those drivers are hard to find in retail because they are used mainly by professional LED builders.

nuclearheli
01/30/2011, 07:37 AM
I believe I have that covered. I plan to mount my stars on an insulating layer of G11, which in turn I will adhere to the entire surface of my heat sink. With respect to the conductor points on the star, I quote:

"Room-temperature vulcanizing sealant, a silicone paste cured at room temperature, or a similar material, is used not only as a means of bonding components together for mechanical purposes, but also to overcome clearance problems. "

Regardless of the voltage and even with the MW drivers, when building any LED array using these stars I would always look at a good insulation layer between my star and heat sink ( something like G11) and also never leave any exposed connections on the star after affixing my leads. That is just common sense and good practice when building an electronic circuit.

You can also cut 1mm groves in the star between the + and - contact points. By the standard this is also an acceptable mitigation technique to overcome creepage as it is defined as the distance over the insulator. However I still don't think it will be necessary to modify the star since it appears more than likely that the distance between the nearest contacts on the board is more than 8 mm which for this voltage application is more than adequate.

People forget 1 important thing: wiring those 200W drivers to stars SHOULD NOT BE DONE.


"Should not be done" unless you know how to do it properly is a more appropriate statement. One needs to employ the same precautions used when building any high voltage power supply.

Also those drivers are hard to find in retail because they are used mainly by professional LED builders.


And you know this how? That statement is somewhat absurd and implies that Home Depot shouldn't sell circuit breakers because the average home owner can easily fry themselves just changing one. There are thousands of dangerous high voltage power supplies and components available all over the place. Just take a trip to radio shack. Like anything else some people shouldn't fool around with a simple battery no less a high voltage power supply. On the other hand if you have some experience and access to professionals that work with this stuff every day, as I do, I believe the risk is significantly reduced. Oh and one more point, have you looked at the so called professional LED arrays for sale for this hobby? Many of them have been manufactured as a niche market by people in their garage who yesterday were not "professional LED builders".

nuclearheli
02/01/2011, 03:24 PM
Just took delivery of three of these puppies. Now these are LED drivers.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=3495&pictureid=25890

Cuervo
02/01/2011, 06:02 PM
That thing is pretty sweet, and for the bigger builds would be much easier to use.

That being said, it should have a small disclaimer -- It is quite a bit more dangerous than the majority of the drivers talked about in these forums.

That thompson driver is definitely a big step up from amatuer, and should only be recommended for someone who knows what they're doing.

Nuclear, you seem to have a pretty grasp of what you're doing, but not everyone in here does, you gotta keep that in mind on stuff like this. ;)

Reminds me of a saying I heard early on in my apprentice electrician days "The other trades hurt people, electricians on the other hand kill people."

nuclearheli
02/01/2011, 06:42 PM
Well said and your right. This puppy needs to be treated with respect. It will be quite a long time before these drivers see real power, or a line cord for that matter.

I am working on routing a piece of plexiglass to fit a dozen stars. When I am done the stars will fit into cavities just deep enough to fill with epoxy resin after connecting the wire leads. Will use some mold release to make sure they come out. I am sealing these things up for good. I plan to fasten a thin strip of G11 to a linear heat sink 68" long with nylon fasteners through the LED stars. The whole assembly will be very well insulated and very VERY carefully tested before any voltage is applied.

It's a little extra trouble but will guarantee a safe and solid build. I plan to build six of these linear strips each with a combination of three different LED's. At the end of each strip I will have a molex connector which will hook to a wire harness I have planned. The wire harness will terminate in a sealed electrical box on the upper side of the canopy. The drivers power and signal will also be terminated with high voltage connections and will plug into the sealed junction box. I do not plan to have a single exposed wire connection or any wire nuts in this build.

If all goes well each linear strip will be independent of the array and I should easily be able to connect and disconnect any of the arrays without affecting the others. I plan to try to make the arrays adjustable from front to back of the tank by connecting them to Uni-strut in the canopy.

It's aggressive for sure but it will be worth it if I can pull it off. It is also slow going because I am really searching the internet to find just the right parts at the best cost. I hope to do a thread of the entire build when I am done. I plan to finish this light for just under $1k. The key is I am in no hurry. I have a nice 90 going and plenty of time to build this 210.

Just couldn't resist so I had to take one of these drivers apart. Amazing, they are built very well for sure.

Cuervo
02/01/2011, 07:48 PM
Are you planning to use optics with them? Sounds like you've got it well thought out, I'll be looking forward to the actual build.

Having looked into it a bit, that driver can be dangerous, but no more dangerous than the shock a person might get from their wall outlet. Actually less dangerous, since most wall outlets are rated for at least 15a at 120V which is way way more than the driver can push. Seems like that driver isn't any more dangerous than the ballast for a big MH or even some of the florescent lighting we have available.

I'll be interested in seeing the pics of how you mount those LED's to avoid a short though.

firechild
02/01/2011, 08:02 PM
The difference between this driver and a MH ballast or even a wall outlet is that you have a large number (potentially upwards of 85 emitters) of connections where shorts can occur. A metal halide is generally a single cable (of 2-3 wires) running between 2 connection points (ballast to lamp or outlet to ballast).

nuclearheli
02/01/2011, 08:16 PM
If you build this correctly there is no excuse to have a short. Far more complex and dangerous circuits are built short free. Things I have seen in posts here I plan not to do. It's common in these posts to mount the stars directly on the heat sink. IMO this is one of the biggest mistakes. Even the 48V supplies are dangerous so proper precautions need to be taken. I plan to take four very simple steps to guarantee no shorts.

1. Test all wiring before applying voltage. I'ts simple to find a dead short without applying voltage.
2. Insulate with G11 between the star and the heat sink. This will give you good thermal transfer with excellent electrical insulation.
3. Seal the PC board of the stars with epoxy after soldering your leads. This eliminates creepage and clearance issues not to mention reducing the likelyhood of touching an energized unprotected connection.
4. Fix the star to the G11 and heat sink using nylon screws completely isolating the star from the AL heat sink.

It really is that simple but the biggest safety tip is to use your head and test your connections. Nothing can take the place of a simple multimeter and your brain.

I do plan to use optics but have not decided on what angle yet. I have been following a lot of the threads on this issue and for that matter on LED builds. I may be taking this build one step beyond extreme but the foundation for what I am doing came from all the good work and comments from these threads. It is well thought out, I have about 5 pages of notes and diagrams. I have built this thing on paper and in my head a thousand times.

I hope it works out as planned, you will find a thread on it regardless. One thing I learned when doing my thesis. Your research is successful even if you prove your theory wrong.

Chris27
02/02/2011, 06:55 AM
I see that you've already figured which way you're going - but I figured I would just post this link for anyone else.

http://www.meanwell.com/search/clg-150/default.htm

I'm using these drivers for my build, parallel strings naturally, but Mouser has these in stock and they are relatively cheap, especially when compared to using 8 ELN's. I'm using 88 LED's with two drivers for those wondering.

nuclearheli
02/02/2011, 07:07 AM
I can't get the link you reference but I see the clg-150 line and I am probably looking at the wrong ones. I see low voltage high amperage supplies that do not have dimming control (at least 0 - 10 Volt control). Am I looking at the wrong ones?

Chris27
02/02/2011, 11:32 AM
I can't get the link you reference but I see the clg-150 line and I am probably looking at the wrong ones. I see low voltage high amperage supplies that do not have dimming control (at least 0 - 10 Volt control). Am I looking at the wrong ones?

Dimming is done manually on these guys, either with an internal POT or an external POT. For those that would typically use a wall wart type 10V supply and associated POT, it isn't necessary with these guys.

nuclearheli
02/02/2011, 11:54 AM
I don't think I am looking at the exact driver you are looking at. The highest voltage one I see is the 48 (constant voltage range) volt with very high current.

The specification sheet I am seeing has the current adjustment for the lowest unit possible at 1.6 amps (Range 1.6 - 2.2 Amps). That is way too high for the Crees unless you are using something else. Also the maximum voltage out of their lowest amp unit is 56 Volts but the constant current region is 36 to 48 volts. How is it possible to run 88 LED's on two of these units? Unless your running parallel strings but even then I would be very careful with the current.

I don't know how you are going to get around the current problem with these units, even adjusted to the lowest current with a pot or something your 600 mV over the maximum rated current for the Crees.

Regardless, these units don't provide for dimming control using any tank controller so they won't work for my application.

dipan
02/03/2011, 11:00 AM
I believe I have that covered. I plan to mount my stars on an insulating layer of G11, which in turn I will adhere to the entire surface of my heat sink.

nuclearheli, what's G11? I assume it's an electrically insulating but highly thermally conductive sheet? Where do you get it?

nuclearheli
02/03/2011, 06:06 PM
I get it from McMastercarr. Here is the direct link. http://www.mcmaster.com/#grade-g-11-garolite/=avnfue

You can probably get it a bit cheaper but their main warehouse is about 10 minutes from my house. I order parts from these guys "Will Call" and pick them up on the way home.

G11 and for that matter G10 is a thermally conductive electrically insulating product made from resins and glass. It's easy to machine and cut. Great stuff. G11 is less reactive than G10 but either product will work for this application. We use G11 at work because the thermal cross section is lower for thermal neutrons which our reactor produces and therefore produces less activated material. But for this application where activation is not an issue G11 or G10 will work equally as well. Which ever is cheaper. This is some of the best material to machine and insulate you will ever find. I plan to machine cavities in this material to place my stars then back fill with epoxy resin.

marc111
02/03/2011, 07:16 PM
I get it from McMastercarr. Here is the direct link. http://www.mcmaster.com/#grade-g-11-garolite/=avnfue

G11 and for that matter G10 is a thermally conductive electrically insulating product made from resins and glass. It's easy to machine and cut. Great stuff. G11 is less reactive than G10 but either product will work for this application. This is some of the best material to machine and insulate you will ever find. I plan to machine cavities in this material to place my stars then back fill with epoxy resin.

Nuclearheli: Interesting material. I tried looking up the specs and although I can find the material properties no one seems to give a spec for how thermally conductive it is. What Kind of thermal resistance, star to heatsink, do you expect to have with this material?

Thanks,
Mark

nuclearheli
02/03/2011, 07:57 PM
Density 0.07 lb/in
Water Absorption 0.2 %
Mechanical Properties
Hardness, Rockwell M 112
Tensile Strength @ Break Crosswise 37,000 psi
Tensile Strength @ Break Lengthwise 43,000 psi
Flexural Modulus Crosswise 2,700 ksi
Flexural Modulus Lengthwise 3,000 ksi
Flexural Strength Crosswise 70,000 psi
Flexural Strength Lengthwise 80,000 psi
Compressive Strength 63,000 psi
Izod Impact, Notched Crosswise 12 ft-lb/in
Izod Impact, Notched Lengthwise 9 ft-lb/in

Electrical Properties
Dielectric Constant 4.5
Dielectric Strength 900 V/mil
Dissipation Factor 0.02
Arc Resistance 120 sec

Thermal Properties
CTE, linear 68F 7.2 in/in-F
CTE, linear 20C Transverse to Flow 8.33 in/in-F
Thermal Conductivity 2 BTU-in/hr-ft-F
Maximum Service Temperature, Air 329 F
Flammability, UL94

nanotank
02/04/2011, 12:11 PM
I would have to pass on these. I have been hit with 220 before and it felt like I got hit in the head with a hammer. Not to mention the hole in my shirt and the small burn/hole on my stomach where it arched to the metal. That was life changing as far as dealing with electricity goes. Also saw a buddy hit some power lines with a ladder and watched the ends of his shoes blow off along with the tips of his toes. Another guy i knew in a man lift his some power lines. Lets just say he was cooked and nothing but a piece of charcoal was left. 48v I can handle the larger stuff I stay clear of and leave it to the professionals. Good luck, sounds like you have a good handle on these but it only takes 1 mistake.

Cuervo
02/04/2011, 12:35 PM
lol.. electricty is no joke, these drivers are for people who know what they're doing.

They don't really compare to what's coming across a power line though, the amperage coming out of that driver isn't going to blow your fingertips off. (it can still kill you though.. but so can a nightlight)

I knew a couple guys who blew their fingertips off in the Navy - 3 phase 440V will put a hurting on ya. the worst thing to get blasted by though was the power for the radar sets -- instead of 60Hz it was (as I recall) 400Hz.. that was some nasty stuff.

BoBilo
02/07/2011, 10:44 AM
Any updates?

nanotank
02/07/2011, 01:12 PM
Any updates?

If we get no response we can only wonder what may have happened on this build... :hmm4::blown::blown::blown:

nuclearheli
02/07/2011, 01:22 PM
If we get no response we can only wonder what may have happened on this build... :hmm4::blown::blown::blown:

If your waiting on me to electrocute myself don't hold your breath. I didn't realize you would be interested in hearing when UPS was going to deliver my parts. I have actually started my build yesterday but still don't have the LED's yet, they are on the way. I will be starting a thread soon, perhaps tomorrow or Wednesday. Be sure to let you know.

BoBilo
02/07/2011, 02:39 PM
I look forward to reading it and hopefully you have a good breakdown of everything as I plan on doing an LED build for my 150 and I'm considering the 200w TRP drivers.

nanotank
02/07/2011, 03:44 PM
If your waiting on me to electrocute myself don't hold your breath. I didn't realize you would be interested in hearing when UPS was going to deliver my parts. I have actually started my build yesterday but still don't have the LED's yet, they are on the way. I will be starting a thread soon, perhaps tomorrow or Wednesday. Be sure to let you know.

Just bringing some humor to the thread..... :dance:

Def interested in your thread also.

nuclearheli
02/11/2011, 05:48 PM
I look forward to reading it and hopefully you have a good breakdown of everything as I plan on doing an LED build for my 150 and I'm considering the 200w TRP drivers.

If anyone is still interested I started a build thread on the entire build.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1975251