PDA

View Full Version : Moray Snowflake Eel


studogg
02/26/2011, 06:19 PM
Thinking about getting one from the LFS for $30. Is that an ok price?

Would it be compatible with a hawkfish, hippo tang, marine beta, and clarki clown? The only other stuff I have are some softies and sps and snails.

thanks

palmer373
02/26/2011, 08:20 PM
they can be bulldozers. $30 seems like a nice price. dont see a problem with the fish listed.

rssjsb
02/27/2011, 11:03 AM
Probably would be ok for a while. However, when these fish hit the 24" mark, they can start eating tankmaktes and can eat surprisingly large fish (angels, butterflies). The clown and hawk would be an appetizer.

studogg
02/28/2011, 04:51 PM
By bulldozers, you mean they knock the rocks around? That could cause an avalanche.

rssjsb
02/28/2011, 08:52 PM
It's more that they tunnel.

Korrine
03/01/2011, 11:07 AM
These are one of the most fish compatible moray's out there. They actually have flat teeth for eating inverts, not the normal sharp pointy teeth.

What size is your tank? Your fish list sounds fine.

Korrine
03/01/2011, 11:10 AM
here

Enter a few of the non-fish eating Morays; particularly the delightful species of this article's focus, the Snowflake Moray, Echidna nebulosa. It doesn't get too big, grow too fast, generally harass other tankmates (unless they're crustaceans...), and for the family, is quite active during daylight hours. Small wonder that it is the most commonly encountered species of true eel offered in the trade.

The Snowflake, Starry, or Diamond-Backed Moray, Echidna nebulosa (Ahl 1789) is a fabulous aquarium species; small, compatible with other fish species and adaptable to captivity. It is certainly the most peaceful, outgoing and desirable moray species. To about thirty inches total length. Base color of silver gray with black and yellow "snowflakes" randomly sprinkled over the lower body

Selection:
Most Snowflake specimens are easy to sort through. They come in two distinct qualities: excellent and dying/dead. Really. The standard "check to see that the animal is eating" applies here, and avoiding ones with obvious troubles (open sores, behavioral anomalies), but otherwise the vast majority of Snowflakes offered in the interest are "good to go".
As with all marines you're considering buying, do look over prospective purchases for obvious damage, feeding response.
A small note re size at purchase. In recent years I have seen absolutely tiny Snowflakes (under six inches) offered for sale... I encourage you and the industry to "scale up" here. Buy ten inch or more specimens. The smaller ones are too easily damaged in the chain of supply IMO.
Captive Environment:
Physical:
Irrespective of purchase size, this and all Morays' tanks should be as large as possible (a minimum of sixty gallons, even for small specimens) and supplied with plenty of "stable" cover. Let's expand on these ideas. Moray eels are often "out of sight, out of mind" to aquarists who own them. Hiding by day, more active when their owners are sleeping. For such apparently sedentary creatures, muraenids are "heavy-bodied" and consume good quantities of foods at times, with concurrent waste production. All this foraging, eating/mess-making takes up "capacity" as in volume of their living quarters.
The "stable" cover reference is to remind you of the need for hiding (dark) spaces AND the fact that such arranged decor needs to be "settled" in. That is, not subject to falling onto your aquatic charges. Either "wiggle" heavy rock, decor items till they're settling on "the bottom" (the tank base, filter panel, plenum screen...) or set it on their first, ahead of placing your substrate/s. Do this same sort of "wiggling" of subsequent materials stacked on top of this base to assure their sturdiness.
See below under "Behavior", "On Jumping Out", re the need for a tight-fitting "hole-less" cover.
Chemical:
Per the above metabolic mentions, filtration/circulation/aeration should be vigorous, over-sized. Protein skimming is almost always a "must" with moray eel keeping. Ditto with redundant aeration, biological filtration. Does this mean you can only keep a Snowflake in a "species tank" or Fish Only system? No, have seen this (and even very large Moray species) kept in reef set-ups... with provisions made to mount corals, other sessile invertebrates in permanent position, in upper areas of rock work, and careful attention to just adequate feeding, regular water testing.
This species and most of the Moray family are extremely tolerant of widely and quickly ranging water conditions. Nonetheless, NSW (Near SeaWater) conditions are best to aim for with their captive husbandry, perhaps with slightly reduced specific gravity (a few thousands less than 1.025).
Biological: Tankmates:
Snowflake eel specimens are by and large "live and let live" re their fish companions, but not always. I have archived on our site (www.WetWebMedia.com) a few instances of "Snowflake treachery". Such is definitely not the case with crustaceans. Echidna nebulosa's diet IS mainly crabs and shrimps in the wild. They will assuredly eat yours in captivity. Other non-vertebrate livestock is in no danger.
Behavior
Re Jumping Out:
Moray eels are aquatic Houdini's, seemingly able to get out of any/all containers. What is the price of freedom? Constant vigilance. Know that even after your eel has settled in, it can, will be exploring the surface of its system most nights, possibly leaving... I have seen footage of this species going "intertidal" at night, in search of tasty crustaceans...
Should you discover your moray out on the floor moving, pick it up with a damp towel, rinse it off (yes in the sink with tapwater) and return it to a marine system. Even if the animal is apparently dry, stiff, don't necessarily give up. Do rinse it, and return anyway... and observe to see if it revives in an hour or so. Have witnessed this sort of "resurrection" on several occasions.
Foods/Feeding/Nutrition:
I have yet to come across a Snowflake Eel that would not quickly take to feeding in captivity. Quite the contrary, all types of frozen/defrosted, fresh meaty foods (including chunks of fish) are eagerly accepted. A note re hand-feeding your Morays; don't. In fact, it is a good idea to keep an observant eye on your hands if/when in the Morays tank, while feeding any of your charges... as they can become very excited smelling food, sensing their tankmates behavior... and render very nasty (and easily infected) bites.

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/snowflakemoray.htm

frankpayne32
03/01/2011, 12:08 PM
While many places list snowflakes as "fish safe" IME MANY individual eels will turn on fish in the aquarium. Some will not bother your fish. Some will. This is from first hand experience. While their main diet is crustaceans fish are still on the menu.

Korrine
03/01/2011, 03:03 PM
If they are hungry and the fish are hanging out by them then yes they may take a shot. Feed them well and don't leave them with say mandarins or something like that.

slapshot
03/01/2011, 03:09 PM
I have one that is approaching 2 1/2 to 3 foot. Never bothers anything in the tank unless he gets hungry. Even then he goes after shrimp never fish. He also gets destructive when he is hungry. So when he starts cruising around I just feed him and all is good.

studogg
03/01/2011, 04:02 PM
I have a 75g with the 4 fish and lots of corals. Plenty of hiding places.

I read that article. Thats why i am confused.

rubensito
03/01/2011, 08:00 PM
I would think all the fish listed would be safe for a while, but the hawk in paticular might get eaten eventually....for compatibility with fish, other then zebra, SFE are the way to go

Korrine
03/02/2011, 07:38 AM
A snowflake should be fine. The hawk could be a target when the eel gets larger if it's lounging near the eel and the eel is hungry. Like I said, keep it well fed and things should be fine. Nothing is 100% but odds are in your favor.

frankpayne32
03/02/2011, 08:52 AM
I'm going to continue to disagree with the advice given in this thread. I speak from experience keeping snowflakes in reef tanks. Snowflakes, even "well fed" ones will often go after other fish in the tank eventually. Morays are like snakes. They shouldn't be fed very often. So, a healthy moray will be "hungry" for at least some time every week and will often (not always) go after nearby fish. From somebody whose lost several fish to snowflakes, it's not worth the risk.

Korrine
03/02/2011, 08:59 AM
What fish did it eat?

namxas
03/02/2011, 11:54 AM
I'm going to continue to disagree with the advice given in this thread. I speak from experience keeping snowflakes in reef tanks. Snowflakes, even "well fed" ones will often go after other fish in the tank eventually. Morays are like snakes. They shouldn't be fed very often. So, a healthy moray will be "hungry" for at least some time every week and will often (not always) go after nearby fish. From somebody whose lost several fish to snowflakes, it's not worth the risk.

+1

My specimen even bit ME twice ("pebble teeth" my a$$), and the second time it came OUT of the water to do so while I was replacing a lamp in the canopy.

I lost two Canthagaster puffers, a pink-faced wrasse, and a couple of other fish that I don't recall, a horseshoe crab, and a baseball-sized Dardanus hermit (just got yanked from its shell). Oddly enuff, I remove the hermit from a system for being destructive and figured it was safe in the SFE's "exile tank".

Korrine
03/02/2011, 01:35 PM
well you may want to go with a dwarf moray then :)

Gymnothorax melatremus - Golden dwarf mory
Gymnothorax miliaris - dwarf golden tail

huig
03/02/2011, 01:47 PM
I trained my eels by feeding them only with a long feeding stick.
I always tap the window gently when I feed my eels, and immediately place the food item in front of them.
That way they associate the feeding stick and the tapping with food. I find this reduces aggression during feeding a lot.
Best to start doing this is with relative young eels.

Korrine
03/02/2011, 02:05 PM
good idea :)

Robka
03/02/2011, 03:38 PM
well you may want to go with a dwarf moray then :)

Gymnothorax melatremus - Golden dwarf mory
Gymnothorax miliaris - dwarf golden tail



I am very happy with my Golden Dwarf Moray eel. He is residing with a Starry Blenny, & 3 Two bar Chromis. I had one issue with my GDM eating a Coral Beauty Angel fish, but the fish was sick and not moving around the tank well. I thought it was a mercy killing?

huig
03/04/2011, 02:54 AM
I got the idea when I saw a zoo that trained their frogs to take food in a small container, so they were sure each animal had enough insects. This required less insects.

Everybody seems to think snowflakes are the guppy equivalent of the eels, but IMO they are the nicest ones around!
I have 3 and 2 of them even have blue dots on their body.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=3737&pictureid=25542
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=3737&pictureid=25540

slapshot
03/04/2011, 06:10 AM
I trained my eels by feeding them only with a long feeding stick.
I always tap the window gently when I feed my eels, and immediately place the food item in front of them.
That way they associate the feeding stick and the tapping with food. I find this reduces aggression during feeding a lot.
Best to start doing this is with relative young eels.

Ha, me too. I feed them from only one spot in the tank as they have knocked things over swallowing the food. BTW I also have a 3 foot zebra in the tank. I tap on the glass several times and they come to the feeding area.

I have always had snowflakes in my tank and have never lost a fish. Shrimp, crabs, once a clam but never a fish.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk