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PAnanoguy
10/04/2012, 04:08 PM
Was wondering if anyone has setup a 180 gallon or larger tank in a trailer/ mobile home.

jasonrstewart79
10/04/2012, 04:28 PM
All I can think of is "Fat guy in a little coat..." LOL.

No seriously, thats a lot of weight without some sort of structural reinforcement.

sponger0
10/04/2012, 05:45 PM
Yup. Ive seen it. Someone local to me in my club has a 210 in a mobile home. It was lit by mostly by 2 optic tubes. He also had 2 frag tanks plumbed into it. Pretty awesome little system to be in a trailer.

LaOtIn
10/04/2012, 06:04 PM
I would build a house outside for the tank before I would put one in a mobile home.

My mom lives out in BFE on 40 acres of land, she has a mobile home until they can get the house built, lol everyone within 100 miles of her lives in a mobile home.

point is, I wouldn't put anything past a 50g in her home.

A mobile home just does not have the structural support for a big tank.

you're talking about roughly 1450lbs in water alone. 175 lbs of rock, 150lbs of sand, 200+ lbs of equipment, you're looking at roughly 2000lbs sitting in a 2'x6' area thats about 166lbs per sq foot

frankyrivera
10/04/2012, 06:33 PM
Hey honey boo boo come in and check out my tank lol. That's a lot of weight

mclain75
10/04/2012, 07:09 PM
We have a 180g, a 65g and a 55g all in a mobile home. Yes it's a doublewide that's on a foundation with about 15 steel beams but it's still possible if you can get underneath and reinforce the structure.

And frankyrivera...really? Not everyone who lives in a mobile home is a fat slob with no job and exploits their children....

{Mrs. McLain75}

spamreefnew
10/04/2012, 07:14 PM
bull. Most if not all mobile homes have a steel framed floor with 2 huge I beams going from front to back. Take a look underneath you will see. You could stack two tanks atop each other and not move the floor,IMO

120reefermadnes
10/04/2012, 07:19 PM
Depends on the individual trailer home in question I would say. If you dnt think it will hold build some type of support under the trailer.

120reefermadnes
10/04/2012, 07:23 PM
Mainly the condition and build quality of the trailer needs to be assessed before anything.

Guss
10/04/2012, 07:28 PM
I agree most newer mobiles are built on steel frames that are pretty hefty. Most are proably more sound than some frame homes.

frankyrivera
10/04/2012, 07:40 PM
And frankyrivera...really? Not everyone who lives in a mobile home is a fat slob with no job and exploits their children....

{Mrs. McLain75}[/QUOTE]

Teasing couldn't help it mobile home +fish tank interesting good luck.

staindsoul
10/04/2012, 07:55 PM
Teasing couldn't help it mobile home +fish tank interesting good luck.

Don't you hate it when sarcasm isn't noted. :headwally:

Op, it's all going to depend on the mobile home and placement. Anybody you know a engineer or someone that has done a lot of home renovations(these guys are constantly jacking up floors and have a good knowledge of housing structures)?

ken55
10/04/2012, 07:56 PM
Hey OP,

For what it's worth I would put support under a 180g or larger regardless of what type of home it happens to be in. And yes, I am aware of the steel I beams that are used in the construction of mobile homes.

Just because it sits well today does not mean that it won't slowly start to warp or sag the floor over an extended period of time. That is bad news in ANY home.

:beer:

Reef264
10/04/2012, 11:15 PM
Yes, Just brace Your Floors, You can find Floor Jacks at Lowes for around $30.It will take 2 or 3 jacks.

-Ray

newtank
10/05/2012, 10:11 AM
This is highly situational, I managed mobile home properties for a few years. First, is the home on the slab or just on some gravel, when the home was set up it was leveled, worst case senario, your blocked on gravel, focusing weight on one end over time with ground frost and thaw there's a good chance you will become unlevel, equals bad news for the tank. Also most older homes used a very cheap sub flooring, like particle board, that dissiintigrates when wet. Even the occasional spill will cause a weak spot to form and depending on the tanks placement relative to the main frame spars this could be a huge risk. It's not that it can't be done, just depends on the age of your home, build quality, foundation, and what steps are you taking to mitigate risk.

tobyte1
10/05/2012, 10:43 AM
I live in a double wide MH. Currently, we are running a 210g, a 150g and 4 other SW systems. I built a treated 4 x 4 grid larger than the tank. The 210 sits parallel to the floor joists, so I built the grid wide enough to get 3 joists.
http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p126/tobyte1/210%20gallon%20Saltwater%20Aquarium%20Build/CornerGussets.jpg

After placing the grid under the house, I built concrete pilings to support the grid.
http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p126/tobyte1/210%20gallon%20Saltwater%20Aquarium%20Build/Concretepilings.jpg

I then drove wedges between the pilings and the grid to 'preload' the joists. Tank sits rock soild and has not settled at all....
http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p126/tobyte1/Valley%20Reef%20Club%20TOTM%202012/210gFulltank.jpg

Megatrev62
10/05/2012, 01:07 PM
Depends on what you're putting in the tank. I'd try a frog or turtle tank and if it collapses at least they can go on their way. Good luck

BigAl2007
10/05/2012, 01:41 PM
WAY too many variables for anyone to say yes or no from a keyboard. I'm in the "Construction Industry" and know for a fact some MH frames can handle a tank mid-joist but at the same time I've seen some that I wouldn't want to put a toaster on. As mentioned above way too situational.

Have a qualified contractor (not the guy who just puts up new mailboxes in the neighborhood) to go under and give it a look. Worse case you pour a pad, add support and then add some more.

FWIW I lived in an older conventionally framed home until last year that wouldn't have supported a 55g tank without support. It looked and "felt" solid but when we crawled under the house SHOCKER! We ended up adding a LOT of support for the 90g system.

When in doubt.... Check It Out!

coralsnaked
10/05/2012, 02:08 PM
Any pier and beam setup whether mobile or not would need to have reinforcement support under the house to the local area the tank sits on. Only question is would the flooring in mobile home support weight without sagging. Again supporting the tank on top of the floor may be needed as weel to distribute the weight over more area.

+ 1 on what tobyte 1 showed you.

Mouse
10/05/2012, 09:05 PM
With Mobile Homes it is "suggested" that you have them leveled bi-anually IIRC. If you havent had it done perhaps check into it, Im sure they would have the info req to answer your Q.