PDA

View Full Version : Sharks in Home Aquariums


lucky_snapper
08/10/2013, 11:00 AM
How many of you have a problem with people trying to keep sharks especially the larger sharks like the black tip in the home aquarium. Personally I feel that these animals get much to big and need far too much room for any home aquarium. These animals should only be housed in the largest of commercial facilities.

What say you ?

Fishfirst
08/10/2013, 11:50 AM
Minimum 10000 gallons for blacktips, bonnetheads, smoothhounds, leopards in my professional opinion. A juvi of these species should be a minimum of 5000 gallons.

billsreef
08/10/2013, 06:11 PM
Considering the size they get, and the amount ($$$) of food they need to eat, definitely not for the average home aquarist.

sharkkeeper1
04/08/2014, 02:20 PM
How many of you have a problem with people trying to keep sharks especially the larger sharks like the black tip in the home aquarium. Personally I feel that these animals get much to big and need far too much room for any home aquarium. These animals should only be housed in the largest of commercial facilities.

What say you ?

What say me? I agree completely. I happen to house 4 sharks, and also have a 15*20*3.5 leopard shark tank in the works.

Think it's awful that they try to trick nature and put a six foot shark in an 8 foot aquarium.

_______________________________________________

Love this hobby, but my wallet is running on empty here!http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/images/smilies/headwalls.gifhttp://www.reefcentral.com/forums/images/smilies/debi.gif

sharkkeeper1
04/08/2014, 02:29 PM
[violation]

Graffiti Reef
04/08/2014, 04:03 PM
How many of you have a problem with people trying to keep sharks especially the larger sharks like the black tip in the home aquarium. Personally I feel that these animals get much to big and need far too much room for any home aquarium. These animals should only be housed in the largest of commercial facilities.

What say you ?

Personally I would never keep sharks simply because it would be like keeping a bear or tiger. Sure, you could keep it in as big a tank as money could buy but its still not the same as being in the wild. Sharks are extremely active and scientists have studied activity showing them traveling miles and miles in a singe day. Unlike smaller fish most of us keep, these guys are just too big to be in a tank.

Cu455
04/08/2014, 04:42 PM
There are hundreds of species of sharks. They all aren't 10ft open ocean monsters. Most of sharks I have seen in their natural habitat while diving are just sitting under some rocks.

I don't see an issue with people keeping them. As long as they are well taken care of.

billsreef
04/08/2014, 04:46 PM
[flamealert]...

Cu455
04/08/2014, 04:47 PM
This persons sharks seem happy.
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2390762

airplanes1016
05/01/2014, 03:42 PM
Shut up, what, are you some animal naturalist ("animals are best in the wild"). I have studied sharks for 10 yrs, and they should be in:

Leopards = 3600 through anything above, though I personally would recommend 4000 round to 5500 square or rectangular.

blacktips need around 5500 to 6500.

bonnetheads and smoothhounds should be in a 3600 gallon.

__________________________________________________

Love this how but MY WALLET IS RUNNING DRY HERE!

Not sure where you studied for ten years, but perhaps you should not start a post off with "shut up". You don't come off as creditable.

thenewguy997
05/02/2014, 12:58 PM
my opinion is that i think you would have to basically have a facility built for this animal. You could probably keep a huge shark in a circle tank where it swims in circles all day but i think to really give it a good enviroment youd basically have to have a building built or warehouse where you can house a tank big enough for the animal to actually swim with speed.

Small sharks are a different story.

SwampyBill
05/08/2014, 01:36 AM
This persons sharks seem happy.
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2390762

Oh my...!! :lolspin: I wonder if they shared a cig afterwards...? :love1:

Zoodiver
05/13/2014, 09:39 AM
Personally I would never keep sharks simply because it would be like keeping a bear or tiger. Sure, you could keep it in as big a tank as money could buy but its still not the same as being in the wild. Sharks are extremely active and scientists have studied activity showing them traveling miles and miles in a singe day. Unlike smaller fish most of us keep, these guys are just too big to be in a tank.


Actually, of the 360+ species of elasmobranchs, most stay fairly small compared to what the general public thinks. Most of the benthic sharks occupy a small area in the wild that they establish similar to a 'territory'. Once they find a good place to hide and a food source, they typically don't stray far.


As for the original question: Assuming Black tip shark -Carcharhinus limbatus, not Pacific Black tip reef shark - Carcharhinus melanopterus, those are two VERY different sharks to deal with.
Black tips are VERY high strung animals that then to bolt/dart around quickly went startled. They are also more aggressive towards tank mates and will be a good 3 ft longer than the Black tip reef shark counter parts.
Black tip reef (BTR) on the other hand stay somewhat smaller in comparison and are a more laid back shark. Yes, you still need a very large foot print (swimming pool size), but you don't usually have to deal with the other problems that arise with regular black tips.

I have dealt with both species.

thenewguy997
05/13/2014, 09:46 AM
Baby tiger shark in a 10g nano?

Keoki18
05/21/2014, 01:52 PM
Zoodiver has very good (and logical) points over the captive care of elasmobranchs.
C. limbatus is the common "black tip" seen in the aquarium trade. They are much easier to maintain, and do not grow as large. This being said, they will still require a fairly large pool about 25ft in diameter (IME) to be fully healthy. Another common problem with keeping elasmoranchs in captivity, is the stability of consumed Iodine. Sharks, in specific, require large amounts of Iodine to reduce risk of goiter. Also, lack of proper diet leads to growth abnormalities such as enlarged heads.

I do not have a problem with people keeping sharks, just as long as they do it right.

+1 to airplanes post

fraggin corals
05/22/2014, 01:47 PM
Carcharhinus limbatus is the common blacktip and, as stated by Zoodiver, not maintained by public aquarias due to its behavior. Carcharhinus melanopterus is the blacktip reef shark and is what is commonly available.

Keoki18
05/25/2014, 10:40 AM
My apologies, FC is correct. C. melanopterus is the common one seen in trade.

Illhaveanother
05/28/2014, 05:32 PM
Personally I'm not up for taking any apex type predator fish out of the ocean because the ocean really needs them worse than we do just look at the tuna and the red roughy!

Vilas
05/28/2014, 11:26 PM
When you get a collection permit for your tank here, it specifically states that you are not permitted to keep a great white shark. Makes me wonder why that was a necessary inclusion.

FrightyDog
05/30/2014, 11:44 PM
My LFS was once selling a shark called "grey shark". It was silver with these amazing silver eyes. Probably your average marine shark. I am not sure what happened to them, but they were not "pet material". I work there and these customers were asking "Can I put a 2 sharks and a stingray in a 60 gallon?" I laughed and said 100 minimum for an unhappy cat banded shark.

SantaMonica
06/04/2014, 05:20 PM
I still get asked about the best "beginner" shark to start with.

Cu455
06/04/2014, 05:54 PM
My LFS was once selling a shark called "grey shark". It was silver with these amazing silver eyes. Probably your average marine shark. I am not sure what happened to them, but they were not "pet material". I work there and these customers were asking "Can I put a 2 sharks and a stingray in a 60 gallon?" I laughed and said 100 minimum for an unhappy cat banded shark.

Where do you live?

Cu455
06/04/2014, 05:55 PM
When you get a collection permit for your tank here, it specifically states that you are not permitted to keep a great white shark. Makes me wonder why that was a necessary inclusion.

Even though you can't have a great white you still have a great selection to chose from.

melvinakshay
06/05/2014, 12:20 AM
maybe a nurse shark. I know that they are popular.

Vilas
06/05/2014, 02:15 AM
I was thinking a little ragged tooth would go great in my 65g tank. My permit only allows one a day, however. *duck*

Illhaveanother
06/08/2014, 12:45 PM
Nurse sharks are a terrible choice of sharks to keep

krj-1168
07/24/2014, 08:06 PM
Nurse sharks are a terrible choice of sharks to keep

Yes - the Atlantic, Pacific, and Tawny Nurses are a bad choices for home aquaria as these species can get to be 9-10 feet in length, and will require a good swimming pool sized shark pond(25,000+ gallons) to keep for life.

On the other hand - the Short-tailed Nurse is an excellent species for home aquaria - because it only grows to about 2.5 feet in length. That is if you can find it.

As for keeping sharks - such as Blacktip Reefs, Whitetip Reefs, Atlantic Sharpnose, & Bonnethead. IMO- this should only be done by very experienced home aquarists who also happen to have very deep pockets. As these sharks also tend to require a large swimming pool size shark pond(15,000+ gallons for Atlantic Sharpies & Bonnetheads, 25,000+ gallons for Blacktips) in order to keep them for their lives.

Cu455
07/24/2014, 08:21 PM
Yes - the Atlantic, Pacific, and Tawny Nurses are a bad choices for home aquaria as these species can get to be 9-10 feet in length, and will require a good swimming pool sized shark pond to keep for life.

On the other hand - the Short-tailed Nurse is an excellent species for home aquaria - because it only grows to about 2.5 feet in length. That is if you can find it.

I was going to comment on you stn care guide the other day. You need to update it. It says that stn are only in Europe. Alprazo has a pair that has been dropping eggs. Also benthic sharks bred them.

They are great guides anyone looking to get a shark should give it a read. I know I enjoy reading them. Even the ones for the sharks it will never get.

krj-1168
07/24/2014, 08:48 PM
It says that stn are only in Europe. Alprazo has a pair that has been dropping eggs. Also benthic sharks bred them.

Yes - that profile is a bit out dated, I'll get to soon. Still the Short-Tailed Nurse is an excellent alternative to the larger Nurse sharks.

TFP Marine Biologist
08/01/2014, 10:31 AM
For the majority of home aquariums, tanks that are under 300 gallons, most sharks are inappropriate to keep. Even smaller species of sharks like Black tips use far too much energy in a confined space, are easily spooked and at risk of trauma from colliding with tank walls. The only sharks that are going to do well in what would be considered a very large home aquarium are cat sharks, which are benthic, and stay relatively small.

krj-1168
08/02/2014, 12:19 PM
Well - Keeping sharks isn't for the vast majority of home aquarists any way. This is mostly because of either limited experience(on the part of the aquarist), or limited funds, or limited tank Size.

Keeping sharks is for only the home aquarist who are very experienced. & resourceful, with the funds and room to keep tanks/saltwater ponds that are in excess of 300 gallons. I say ponds - because that is the best way to keep sharks, be they benthic species or active swimming species. Unlike glass or most acrylic aquariums, ponds usually don't have sharp corners. In addition - ponds are usually much cheaper(in cost), and easier to maintain than similar sized (volume) glass/acrylic tanks are.

Even then the active swimming species such as the Blacktip Reef and White Reef sharks (both species can reach up to 6 feet in length) need a swimming pool sized pond. These sharks should never be kept in an rectangular shaped aquarium, nor should they be kept in a pond under 2,000 gallons (as juveniles).

The best sharks for the home aquarists are the small benthic species. Still most benthic sharks available to private aquarists tend to get to between 2-4 feet in length. But there are a few cool water species which are smaller.

Zoodiver
08/02/2014, 01:29 PM
For the majority of home aquariums, tanks that are under 300 gallons, most sharks are inappropriate to keep. Even smaller species of sharks like Black tips use far too much energy in a confined space, are easily spooked and at risk of trauma from colliding with tank walls. The only sharks that are going to do well in what would be considered a very large home aquarium are cat sharks, which are benthic, and stay relatively small.

Though I fully agree with the concept of high energy sharks and tanks, I think the term "smaller species" describing Black tips (which get 6 ft) might be a stretch.

Cu455
08/02/2014, 01:52 PM
Though I fully agree with the concept of high energy sharks and tanks, I think the term "smaller species" describing Black tips (which get 6 ft) might be a stretch.

Lol I was thinking the same thing.

billsreef
08/02/2014, 07:17 PM
Though I fully agree with the concept of high energy sharks and tanks, I think the term "smaller species" describing Black tips (which get 6 ft) might be a stretch.

That's not such a stretch...if your comparing the Black Tip to Great Whites, Basking Sharks, or Whale Sharks :D

Zoodiver
08/03/2014, 08:06 AM
True, Haha.
I guess I look at the 'big' picture. Of the 380 (roughly) species of elasmobranchs, most are not extremely large.

krj-1168
08/03/2014, 10:51 AM
That's not such a stretch...if your comparing the Black Tip to Great Whites, Basking Sharks, or Whale Sharks

True - but since we are talking about sharks available for home aquaria - that's a very different story. Generally speaking most sharks available to private aquarists tend to be in the 2-4 foot range, not 5-6 feet like the Blacktip Reef.

As for the really big sharks like Great Whites, Basking Sharks, & Whale Sharks - these are only suited for large public aquariums of at least 1 million gallons. And even then some of those species can only be kept in captivity for a few months. The Whale Shark is really the only large shark (more than 18 feet) which has been kept in captivity more than a decade.

billsreef
08/03/2014, 04:03 PM
krj-1168,

I think you missed the sarcasm font in my post ;)

BTW, I know I certain store back on LI that routinely had juvenile black tip and white tips for sale :( I won't mention their name, as they got banned so many times for shilling that we nearly wore out the ban button.

krj-1168
08/05/2014, 10:45 AM
I think you missed the sarcasm font in my post

Yeah- I did miss it. Sorry for being so literal, then.

BTW, I know I certain store back on LI that routinely had juvenile black tip and white tips for sale

Things like that are one of the reasons that I generally don't like or trust most of the LFS, I've seen.

TFP Marine Biologist
08/05/2014, 11:34 AM
Though I fully agree with the concept of high energy sharks and tanks, I think the term "smaller species" describing Black tips (which get 6 ft) might be a stretch.

I totally agree, Black Tips should not be on the list of sharks to be kept by home aquarists, I should have been more clear. I cringe at some of the tanks that I have seen Black Tips, Bonnetheads and Nurse Sharks in over the years. Most of my personal experience with captive sharks comes from the public aquarium side of things. In my mind, Black Tips will always be a "smaller" species of shark, Because I am comparing them to Sand Tigers.

SantaMonica
08/05/2014, 11:48 AM
Any go-to source for these recommended cat sharks?

Zoodiver
08/05/2014, 01:10 PM
What type are you looking for?
There are a few suppliers I trust who import sharks.

Fishfirst
08/05/2014, 01:15 PM
You don't need to import them anymore. Quality marine has had several shipments of captive bred bamboo sharks lately... and will continue to get them ;)

krj-1168
08/05/2014, 03:27 PM
There are few places that have captive bred benthic sharks. But they are by no means common or wide-spread at this time.

Most of the tropical benthic sharks that are available to home aquarists (in North America) still tend to be imported from other countries like Australia, or Indonesia. Yes - there are a few temperate/cool water species like the Horn Shark, Swell Shark, & Chain Catshark which are found in North American waters.

Fishfirst
08/05/2014, 06:53 PM
Like I said, quality marine is getting a consistent supply of captive bred bamboo sharks. Ask your lfs to order some in, I bet they can.

Zoodiver
08/06/2014, 06:46 AM
There are several species of bamboo sharks, very few are offered for sale to the pubic from captive breeding.

Fishfirst
08/06/2014, 06:57 AM
Indeed, but two species (C. punctatum, C. plagiosum) are being offered by quality marine that are captive bred and my contacts with them are saying they will be able to get them consistently as long as demand continues. This is great news!

krj-1168
08/06/2014, 04:33 PM
The Brown-banded Bamboo (C. punctatum) and the White-spotted Bamboo(C. plagiosum) are with out a doubt the two most common species bred in captivity. That's because they are the two most common species of sharks in home/private aquaria. They are without a doubt the cheapest species - regularly offered for sale for $100 or less. These are also two of the hardiest and easiest to keep species of sharks.

The Coral Catshark (A. mormaratus) is the next most common species.

But the hallmark of a great captivity breeding program is that you are regularly breeding species which aren't very common or well known.

SantaMonica
08/06/2014, 09:30 PM
Well the Brown Banded seems ideal for a nice size sand bed or reef pond.

Fishfirst
08/06/2014, 09:50 PM
The Brown-banded Bamboo (C. punctatum) and the White-spotted Bamboo(C. plagiosum) are with out a doubt the two most common species bred in captivity. That's because they are the two most common species of sharks in home/private aquaria. They are without a doubt the cheapest species - regularly offered for sale for $100 or less. These are also two of the hardiest and easiest to keep species of sharks.

The Coral Catshark (A. mormaratus) is the next most common species.

But the hallmark of a great captivity breeding program is that you are regularly breeding species which aren't very common or well known.

I guess I don't understand what you are saying... is it not a good thing that these two species are regularly available now captive bred? I don't know if there are other species coming from the same place or what but I consider this a win for wild populations.

Fishfirst
08/06/2014, 09:51 PM
And who knows... this may just be the beginning.

Cu455
08/06/2014, 10:10 PM
I wouldnt't say captive breed sharks are common and the majority of sharks are wild caught. For the average hobbiest looking for something common they can go the captive breed route. It will have to be something they want to do. If you get it from a store it is most likely wild.
ReefGen sells captive breed chain catsharks and white spotted. Another store which will remain nameless also sells captive breed sharks. I already got flamed once for telling someone to check it out once.

krj-1168
08/06/2014, 10:49 PM
I guess I don't understand what you are saying... is it not a good thing that these two species are regularly available now captive bred? I don't know if there are other species coming from the same place or what but I consider this a win for wild populations.

Of course - it great the Brown-banded & White-spotted Bamboos are being captive bred. But they are still not being captive bred enough to completely eliminate the need for wild caught specimens- at this time.

In addition - there are a lot of shark species which actually are even better suited for captivity which should also be captive bred. Among the Bamboos - the Arabian and Gray Bamboos are both smaller in size, but unfortunately rarely seen. There is at least half dozen Epaulette species which would be great for captive breeding programs. In addition - there are several catsharks, horn sharks, wobbegongs, and other carpet sharks which would be very good as well.

Zoodiver
08/07/2014, 06:42 AM
I'm working on the Arabian and Grays. :)

Fishfirst
08/07/2014, 06:44 AM
Of course it isn't going to eliminate the need... it is an option though, and until they run out I don't see a need to import more.

krj-1168
08/07/2014, 11:22 AM
it is an option though, and until they run out I don't see a need to import more.

That's the problem - at present even the white-spotted and brown banded bamboos aren't being captive bred enough to full the demand from private aquarists.

With Sharks -at present time it is not like it is with clownfish, were the vast a majority are being captive bred. Right now - private shark aquarists are basically in the same situation - as private parrot aviculturists were in the early to mid 1970's. That is with the vast majority of species still being regularly imported. And only a few species being regularly bred in captivity by private breeders. It really wasn't until the governments started to ban or seriously limit importation of parrots in the late 1970's-early 1980's that you saw a huge increase in numbers of private parrot breeders.

Basically the same thing needs to happen with benthic sharks, now. There needs to be more private shark aquarists that actually get into breeding sharks. It is quite possible to think that in 10-20 years - most benthic species of sharks will no longer be imported. And if there aren't that many breeders - then the future prices of even species like the White-spotted and Brown Banded bamboos could easily rival those of epaulettes today.

Fishfirst
08/07/2014, 05:09 PM
My contacts at QM say they have a consistent source producing around 10-20/month which from what I know about shark breeding that's a ton of eggs! They told me that as long as demand continues, they will continue to provide them. They also said they are all over a month old and feeding well on Krill and PE mysis.

billsreef
08/07/2014, 06:00 PM
My contacts at QM say they have a consistent source producing around 10-20/month

While any captive breeding is a good thing, 10 to 20 per month for a wholesaler translates to maybe 10 to 15 stores in the entire country getting them in any given month...and those will be out of only a handful of their top customers...so very slim availability at the retail end. Small volume shops buying from them might try ordering them, but will likely never receive any...at least not till availability gets up into the hundreds per month. Just the realities of how the supply chain works.

Fishfirst
08/07/2014, 06:19 PM
While any captive breeding is a good thing, 10 to 20 per month for a wholesaler translates to maybe 10 to 15 stores in the entire country getting them in any given month...and those will be out of only a handful of their top customers...so very slim availability at the retail end. Small volume shops buying from them might try ordering them, but will likely never receive any...at least not till availability gets up into the hundreds per month. Just the realities of how the supply chain works.

I have to disagree... sharks are not in "high" demand... 10-20 per month is a ton of pressure off of wild populations. I see the in stock list every day, the shark numbers don't change often, meaning they don't get new shipments frequently.

billsreef
08/07/2014, 06:31 PM
IME, many stock lists are closer to wish lists...meaning don't always believe what you see in print ;)

FYI, back in my LFS days I would have been good for one or two those per month myself :)

Fishfirst
08/07/2014, 07:20 PM
This is fairly real time (at least it is updated several times per day). Internet is a wonderful thing. But whatever, I guess I know nothing... I am not going to get into some stupid ****ing match ;)
I watch groups of animals on QM all the time. I buy when there are enough of them left to get what I want, but not fresh off the plane.

Cu455
08/07/2014, 09:20 PM
My contacts at QM say they have a consistent source producing around 10-20/month which from what I know about shark breeding that's a ton of eggs! They told me that as long as demand continues, they will continue to provide them. They also said they are all over a month old and feeding well on Krill and PE mysis.

Can you find out how many they sell a month? Not only the white spotted but other sharks to. I am kind of curious.

krj-1168
08/07/2014, 11:27 PM
10-20 per month is quite low when wholesalers like Sea Dwelling Creatures in L.A.. As a couple of months ago they(SDC) had 200+ Tank raised (Marbled "Cat Sharks") White-spotted Bamboo pups.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lelCJweGTOE

Also keep in mind that there are literally thousands of pet and fish shops in North America. Most of which tend to by their stock directly from wholesalers.

Fishfirst
08/08/2014, 02:21 AM
Wow, thanks for reminding me why I don't do business with SDC. Their tanks look like crap. I bet a lot of those sharks died... the tanks are pretty cloudy. Anyway how many of these are left? I am aware of how many stores there are but only a small percentage should get these sharks in on a regular basis due to the fact that they require such a large system... not sure how ethical it is. The 20 bamboo sharks are down to 5 in qm, and these became available like 3 weeks ago.

billsreef
08/08/2014, 05:20 AM
This is fairly real time (at least it is updated several times per day). Internet is a wonderful thing. But whatever, I guess I know nothing... I am not going to get into some stupid ****ing match ;)
I watch groups of animals on QM all the time. I buy when there are enough of them left to get what I want, but not fresh off the plane.

Sounds like you've been far luckier with your stock lists than I've experienced.

Zoodiver
08/08/2014, 05:37 AM
I'm with Bill, I never believe a stock list.

The video of the white spotted bamboo sharks at SDC reminded me of what out holding tanks looked like at the aquarium in MN when we were breeding various bamboo species - more sharks that water. Haha.

As for wild caught pet trade sharks being sold into the US, I would say the number is in the hundreds per month. At this point none of the US captive breeding is going to make a huge in that figure. That being said, I know a handful of facilities that are focusing on specifically elsamo breeding for the hobby. The idea is to be able to take the full demand off of the more common species of wild caught sharks suited for the pet trade instead of just a few captive breed animals here and there.

krj-1168
08/08/2014, 01:39 PM
As for wild caught pet trade sharks being sold into the US, I would say the number is in the hundreds per month. At this point none of the US captive breeding is going to make a huge in that figure.

Excellent points.

And if the idea of hundreds of sharks being sold per month in the US sounds high. Just think about all of the other marine fishes which are sold in the thousands per month sold in the U.S.

While Captive breeding of benthic sharks is really the only sustainable choice for private shark aquarists in the long term. It will take hundreds of elasmo breeding facilities to completely remove the need for importing wild sharks into the pet trade.

Cu455
08/08/2014, 08:16 PM
Did anyone realize almost all the sharks on ebay disappeared? The other day there was an epaulette, smoothhound, nurse and a couple others. Now there are only 2 sharks for sale by a person who sells random stuff. I doubt they all sold in a day.

noel754g1
08/08/2014, 10:09 PM
How many of you have a problem with people trying to keep sharks especially the larger sharks like the black tip in the home aquarium. Personally I feel that these animals get much to big and need far too much room for any home aquarium. These animals should only be housed in the largest of commercial facilities.

What say you ?

Agree 100%

reefgoddess808
08/09/2014, 09:51 AM
I have loved sharks since I was a little girl. The allure of having one swimming in my home every day is tempting, but my conscience would never let me actually have them. This is of course just my opinion on the matter, I love them too much to keep them captive in my home. If breeding programs would help diminish the need for wild caught I feel we should all be doing whatever we can to make this happen on a larger scale. Of course there is more to consider with sharks than say clown fish so its not as though the average person could have a home start up, but surely we could have more aquaculture facilities. Just a thought. Perhaps if I ever hit the power ball Ill start shark breeding programs across the country! LOL

krj-1168
08/09/2014, 10:53 AM
The all out restriction of sharks available to private aquarists, by governmental law - isn't the answer. Such things need to be approached with common sense and some rational logic.

IMPO - Arizona's state law regarding private aquarists keeping sharks goes overboard. As in that state - a private aquarist needs a "wild animal" permit in order to keep a bamboo shark or a catshark in their home.

Private Aquarists are capable of doing so much. While the average private aquarist may not be able to keep much more than a small benthic shark like a bamboo, an epaulette, or a catshark. A wealthy private aquarist with deep pockets, and the required space may be able to keep more active requiem sharks like Whitetip & Blacktip reefs for life.

krj-1168
08/10/2014, 01:33 PM
Of course there is more to consider with sharks than say clown fish so its not as though the average person could have a home start up, but surely we could have more aquaculture facilities.

It's it wouldn't be that hard for an private aquarist to breed sharks as some may think. As most of the small benthic sharks(bamboos, eppies, catsharks & small wobbies) can be bred in round ponds of only 6-8 feet in diameter. As Chris Avila of Canadian Marine Aquaculture, has pointed out. Presently has about 20 species of benthic sharks. And he started out 7 years ago - with just a couple of sharks.

Zoodiver
08/12/2014, 02:19 PM
Most bamboo sharks are like rabbits when it comes to breeding. Keep them wet and fed, sooner or later (assuming you have a male/female pair), you will have eggs... loads of them.

The trick with sharks is you need to think outside the tank. People try to figure out a tank size for them. Pre-made aquariums/tanks aren't the cost effective way to house sharks. Fiberglass or PVC pools work much better for 1/4 the price. I have a 1,200 gallon shark pool set up that I have less than $500 total into (pool and related filtration). I don't always have it up and running, but it does the trick when I need to house a shark or three.

Typical above ground swimming pools also work great fi you want something with more volume (3,000 - 15,000 gallons). I love using pools made by Intex. They are of great quality and suit the needs of many smaller ORV sharks (black tip reefs, bonnets, sharp nose etc...).

krj-1168
08/14/2014, 09:52 AM
I have a 1,200 gallon shark pool set up that I have less than $500 total into (pool and related filtration). I don't always have it up and running, but it does the trick when I need to house a shark or three.

I knew that pools/ponds were cheaper. But I didn't realize that it is possible to set up a 1,000+ gallon pool and filtration for less than it would cost for a 180 gallon glass tank (no filtration).

So basically - if you want to keep sharks - forget getting the 180+ gallon glass or acrylic aquariums. Get at 750-1,200 gallon pool. The sharks will be happier, and you will have more money in your wallet.

Zoodiver
08/14/2014, 10:30 AM
Yep, Intex pools are ruggid and cheap.

Another route I've helped people set up is the American Farmland 8 ft x 2 ft pool. $350, a touch over 600 gallons and PLENTY of space for many of the various bamboo and cat sharks.

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/american-farmlandreg%3B-round-tank-8-x-2-ft-plastic

http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/17/ea/b4/17eab4223bc06ad758a1a37430705216.jpg

Cu455
08/14/2014, 10:42 AM
I have the 6ft version of this. http://www.dreampond.com/show-tanks-viewing-bowls.html

You can get the bay knockoff one for $150. http://www.ebay.com/itm/340-Gal-Flexible-Koi-Goldfish-Tank-6x2-for-Breeding-Growing-Quarantine-Display-/261261698778?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd46926da

For filtration you can get a brute can for $20 and 150 pot scrubbers for another $20. Click on the picture to see the video.

http://i967.photobucket.com/albums/ae158/cu455cu455/Mobile%20Uploads/th_trim67408D5A-8351-469C-BFE8-6BC433D571CA_zps9569b307.mp4 (http://i967.photobucket.com/albums/ae158/cu455cu455/Mobile%20Uploads/trim67408D5A-8351-469C-BFE8-6BC433D571CA_zps9569b307.mp4)

shark2
08/16/2014, 07:59 PM
Sharks are cool. I have 2 swell sharks.

krj-1168
08/18/2014, 11:43 AM
Cool species. And one which is unfortunately rarely seen in private aquaria.

Cu455
08/18/2014, 06:41 PM
A wholesaler has swell sharks now. I am not sure which one though. They also have zebra bulkheads?

Zoodiver
08/20/2014, 12:54 PM
Zebra bullheads/Zebra horns are amazing looking sharks, but a gamble for the money. I've seen them as high as $3,000 (USD) for sub adults.

http://www.aquariumdomain.com/images/fish_marine/ZebraBullheadShark3.jpg

TheBookWorm
09/02/2014, 11:30 PM
Sharks are great. I wish I could keep them, and once designed a huge 50,000 gallon "L" shaped tank that a house would have to be designed around. It was 10' deep, 10' wide, and each of the lengths were 30', I think.

krj-1168
09/03/2014, 01:00 AM
L-shaped tanks or any tank with 90 degree corners really isn't good for sharks. Sharks generally do best in ponds which are round, oval, or figure 8 shaped.

In addition - you don't need a 50,000 gallon tank to keep sharks in - unless you are attempting to keep large species like Nurse Sharks, or Sandbar (Brown) Sharks. In which case - 10 foot width would be too narrow for these sharks. Smaller requiem sharks(Bonnetheads, Sharpnose, BTR & WTR) can be kept in pools of about 15,000-20,000 gallons. And small benthic sharks(Bamboo, eppies and catsharks) can be kept in pools of less than 1,000 gallons.

In addition - with smaller requiems and benthic sharks - the water depth is less important than the length and width. For small benthic sharks - a water depth of 2-2.5 feet is fine. While active swimming sharks - like smoothhounds, leopards, small reef sharks, and small coastal requiem sharks need a depth of 3+ feet.

VonUberReefer
09/03/2014, 12:31 PM
lol

TheBookWorm
09/03/2014, 07:20 PM
I know L shaped aquariums aren't good for sharks, but I designed that part out of wood, so that it wasn't a rough corner.

krj-1168
09/04/2014, 12:51 AM
I know L shaped aquariums aren't good for sharks, but I designed that part out of wood, so that it wasn't a rough corner.

It doesn't make a difference if it is made of wood, fiberglass or acrylic. It is the fact that it is a 90 degree corner. And the problem with a L-shaped tank is that you have 6 sharp corners. Any swimming shark put in that tank will eventually bump it's nose. Which will either kill the shark or seriously injury it.

Plus generally speaking wood wouldn't give needed strength to support 50,000 gallons of water. Wood is okay for smaller ponds(up to a few thousand gallons) - with liners. But not so for larger tanks, (over 10,000 gallons).

While changing the tank design would be best. The next best option is to have either some rock work(real or fake) or some over flow boxes in these corners to eliminate these sharp corners.

TheBookWorm
09/04/2014, 03:09 AM
I was never going to build it anyways.

TNTtropical
09/04/2014, 07:24 PM
Hey Cu455 how much are the Zebra horns?? Just curious