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Doc_Polit
11/06/2013, 10:47 PM
I have a chance to buy a 130-gallon Starphire, rimless tank. However, the dimensions are a little strange. It is 72"L x 25"H x 15"W.

I have seen shallow tanks but this one (at 15") seems really narrow.

Would this be suitable for a first reef tank?

I plan to keep a Yellow Tang among other smaller inhabitants. With somewhat minimal aqua-scaping would the Tang thrive?

I appreciate your feedback.

H.reidi.MN
11/06/2013, 10:53 PM
Its a bit narrow but the length is good. Go with a taller Bosnia aqua scape and leave room for fish to pace the length of the tank like a tang . I think its a nice size tank if the price is right.

Wmich2008
11/07/2013, 12:52 AM
Really depends on how you want it to look but the width won't give you much room to play with. I would go at least 24 inches, unless you are getting a real good deal on the 130. If it's a good deal you can make it look nice and work well with the right aquascape.

Doc_Polit
11/09/2013, 02:19 PM
I am having trouble locating a standard 180 (pre-owned) in my area and don't want to shell out the $650 Cdn for a new one.

Another possibility that I found is a 180 long (96"L x 18"W x 24"H).

Would this be a better option?

Buzz1329
11/09/2013, 02:40 PM
Its a bit narrow but the length is good. Go with a taller Bosnia aqua scape and leave room for fish to pace the length of the tank like a tang. I think its a nice size tank if the price is right.

What's a Bosnia aqua scape?

To the OP:

The 72 x 15 footprint gives you 25% more surface to aqua scape than a "standard" 48 x 18 (75/90) tank and the extra water volume won't hurt either. But the extra depth and length could cause some lighting complications if you want to keep SPS/Tridacna clams. If you’re looking at softies and LPS, you should be fine. Also, is tank pre-drilled? If not, check out glass-holes.com to make sure you have the intestinal fortitude to drill.

Politiceaux
11/09/2013, 02:45 PM
I am having trouble locating a standard 180 (pre-owned) in my area and don't want to shell out the $650 Cdn for a new one.

Another possibility that I found is a 180 long (96"L x 18"W x 24"H).

Would this be a better option?
If you have the room for it, it would absolutely be a better option - all things equal.

Alex T.
11/09/2013, 02:47 PM
Sorry..quoted wrong person.

Alex T.
11/09/2013, 02:49 PM
What's a Bosnia aqua scape?

To the OP:

The 72 x 15 footprint gives you 25% more surface to aqua scape than a "standard" 48 x 18 (75/90) tank and the extra water volume won't hurt either. But the extra depth and length could cause some lighting complications if you want to keep SPS/Tridacna clams. If you’re looking at softies and LPS, you should be fine. Also, is tank pre-drilled? If not, check out glass-holes.com to make sure you have the intestinal fortitude to drill.

I'm guessing they meant "bonsai".

H.reidi.MN
11/10/2013, 01:13 AM
Ya dang auto correct

Duvallj
11/10/2013, 01:22 AM
I donno about narrow tanks. Its harder to get "depth", either by foreground/background placement of corals, or placement of rocks. When the tank is too narrow it just seems to be a pile of rock towards the back wall. With wider tanks you can have ridges that are in front/behind, arches that go from back and to the front, mountain of sps with lps towards the bottom in front. Probably bad descriptions, but anyways I'd take width over length for the same volume.

In the end pick what you want. If you think to yourself that its "exactly what you want", pick it up. However if you think "hmmm wish it was alittle wider/taller/ect" you may find yourself thinking that every time you look at the tank.

Boston21
11/10/2013, 01:42 AM
In my opinion, I like the look of taller tanks, but I feel most people have a easier time lighting/arranging a wider tank because of ease of light penetration and that probably contributing to great growth rates. Get what you can afford to light properly for whatever your planning to get/keep.

rovster
11/10/2013, 08:04 AM
IMHO, get the tank you want, not what is a good deal. Even if you had to she'll out for a new 180, the cost of the tank compared to everything else you need and livestock is not really a big chunk unless you get into the really big ones, even then the equipment to run the big ones ain't cheap either. You don't want to drop a couple grand on livestock and equipment, and look back and wish you'd spent that extra $500 for the tank you REALLY wanted from the beginning.

BossHoggin
11/10/2013, 12:53 PM
A 4x2x2 120 is the prefect size unless space is a non-issue and you want certain fish like tangs that need a longer tank. The depth alows you to create steps from front to back to give a sense of depth amd easier coral placemnt with less shadows.

on the spot
11/10/2013, 01:41 PM
IMHO, get the tank you want, not what is a good deal...You don't want to drop a couple grand on livestock and equipment, and look back and wish you'd spent that extra $500 for the tank you REALLY wanted from the beginning.

This is sage.

However, there is room for the exceptional deal as the exception.

Doc_Polit
11/10/2013, 11:47 PM
Thanks a lot for the feedback. I am thinking, now, of waiting until the New Year and having a tank custom built to suit me.

That gives me plenty more time to surf RC and research. :thumbsup:

GroktheCube
11/11/2013, 03:04 AM
I'd strongly suggest getting a 24"+ deep tank. The plain ole 4'x2'x2' 120 is a pretty good size, in my opinion. However, if you have your heart set on medium sized tangs (Zebramosa), sacrificing a little width for greater length would probably make the fish happier.

It is just dramatically easier to aquascape a wider tank. It's much easier to create a greater illusion of depth via placement of foreground and background structures to force perspective.

nmbeg
11/11/2013, 03:25 AM
I have a 125---72L x 18W x 22D I think. I hate the lack of width. Makes aquascaping difficult without piling against back wall, and that makes dead spots in the tank.

Voxboy
11/11/2013, 10:00 PM
I think 15" is really narrow. It may be a good deal now......but will cost you more to upgrade to a deeper tank. If you get hooked on this hobby....you will upgrade to a bigger tank. I like 6 foot tanks...the longer the better. 150 to 180 would be ideal.