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sevenyearnight
11/14/2013, 03:34 AM
It's about 4:30 am, so I apologize for this is question, but there is a highly reputable marine store, locally owned, and they post photographs of their livestock on Facebook. It's hard to tell if the fish are under water, in a photography box, or in open air, but it looks like they are holding the fish. And the seastars, etc. Like holding them in their bare hands. My first question is, is it ok or normal to hold a fish? It seems like it would be exceptionally stressful, and maybe the hands might have some residue from something.
My second question, why are the fish just chilling like "Yep, I'm being held and I'm ok with this." Is it just a lucky shot taken in between desperate flailing?

Reef Frog
11/14/2013, 10:02 AM
I don't think I've ever seen a picture of a fish for sale on line in someone's hands. Most photos are taken in tank, or an acclimation box which is fine too.

Most of the photos you see of "common fish" are stock photos and not the fish that you will actually receive if you order. But rare fish from Divers Den for example are often labeled WYSIWYG and the buyer will get that fish.

sevenyearnight
11/14/2013, 10:12 AM
I had someone else look at the photos, the dude is for real holding the fish with his hands. I just asked them why they do that.

caribfan
11/14/2013, 10:15 AM
There are a couple stores that make a habit of doing that. Specifically pacific island aquatics, which is a pretty highly regarded store.

sevenyearnight
11/14/2013, 11:51 AM
The fish are just hanging out above the hands under water and in a dark area. That's why they're not overly alarmed.

mayjong
11/14/2013, 01:57 PM
i've seen it online and at my lfs. my lfs does it because (he says) it is a faster way of identifying disease and malnutrition than trying to observe it in tank. he always goes it about 1" above a bucket, with a little bit of water in his hand, fish lying on its side.
weird thing is, every time i have seen it (a bunch) the fish never squirm, they just lay there.

MDO
11/15/2013, 10:33 AM
Some fish are used to being handled. They usually have the fish out of water for just a few seconds with a second person to snap the photo. Some like seeing the fish like that see the various patterns and coloration and to show WYSIWYG. I am pretty sure it is stressful though.

billsreef
11/15/2013, 11:59 AM
I am pretty sure it is stressful though.

It is. Fish have a definite cortisol (stress hormone) response to such handling. Lifting a fish out of the water, even briefly, is akin to someone holding your head under water ;)

Cu455
11/16/2013, 07:28 AM
People who breed fish in a pond will take pictures out of water. This is because it's hard to get a side picture of the fish. Even wild caught fish are photographed like this to. Sometimes venders will post pictures of fish before they are imported and you can see the collecting gear in the background. I don't really see it that often in saltwater, I see it a lot with cichlids. A lot of times they will leave the net and fish in the water and lift it to the surface.

In addition to what other people said about it stressing out the oils on our hands are also not good for the fish.

sevenyearnight
11/16/2013, 12:02 PM
Just to make sure this is clarified, the fish are most certainly underwater, they are not being exposed to the air at all. They are not exactly even being held, just hovering above the hand, underwater.

ATLL765
11/18/2013, 11:23 AM
Might just be to get a little more contrast in the pic and make it easier to see the outline of the fish in the photo.

Cu455
11/18/2013, 06:13 PM
Can you post some of these pictures?

sevenyearnight
11/18/2013, 10:01 PM
Can you post some of these pictures?

No, as I am not the owner of these pictures. But the fish are not out of the water, and aren't really in direct contact with the hand. I'm satisfied with the explanation of the photography. They are in a darkened acclimation container, and instead of scooping them out and putting them into a photography box, they prefer to just photograph them underwater near the surface. Evidently a common practice that I just had never personally seen.

Da Maui life
11/19/2013, 10:58 AM
Can you post some of these pictures?

Cu455
11/19/2013, 03:37 PM
No, as I am not the owner of these pictures. But the fish are not out of the water, and aren't really in direct contact with the hand. I'm satisfied with the explanation of the photography. They are in a darkened acclimation container, and instead of scooping them out and putting them into a photography box, they prefer to just photograph them underwater near the surface. Evidently a common practice that I just had never personally seen.

I have nothing against the practice. I think it is better then moving them into another tank to take a picture. It was just out of curiosity after having a conversation about.

Cu455
11/19/2013, 03:38 PM
Thanks.

sevenyearnight
11/19/2013, 03:45 PM
I agree, the transfer process to another container to be photographed seems like it would be more stressful than just keeping them in the acclimation unit.
It was just a really strange thing to see, and it was odd mostly because they didn't at all appear to be distressed by the hand under them. My main concerns were about them being still underwater, which they were, and that it wasn't like they were chasing them frantically around a display tank and finally getting them after being exhausted. They were just chilling in the acclimation containers waiting to be transferred.

chris_88
11/20/2013, 11:20 AM
I always hand place my fish from the bucket to the quarantine tank then to the display tank, I've never had a problem...... Well except for my niger trigger I used to have, he bit me from the bucket to the qt but not to the dt

mayjong
11/20/2013, 05:15 PM
I always hand place my fish from the bucket to the quarantine tank then to the display tank, I've never had a problem...... Well except for my niger trigger I used to have, he bit me from the bucket to the qt but not to the dt

me too...

sonoma2nv
11/21/2013, 04:03 PM
I don't think I've ever seen a picture of a fish for sale on line in someone's hands. Most photos are taken in tank, or an acclimation box which is fine too.

Most of the photos you see of "common fish" are stock photos and not the fish that you will actually receive if you order. But rare fish from Divers Den for example are often labeled WYSIWYG and the buyer will get that fish.
u havet see ebay pics.i wouldnt do it buy there there to sell them so i see why they wouldhard to get a good pick in the tank swimming

GTR
11/21/2013, 04:10 PM
I'll transfer fish with gloved hands from acclimation bins to tank. Also when doing FW dips or medicated baths. It's a lot faster and you needn't worry about fish getting stuck in the net. Dwarf angels get their opercular spines stuck and many wrasses bite the net and won't let go. :lol:

sonoma2nv
11/21/2013, 04:33 PM
all my fish are caucght using a specimin jar

Da Maui life
11/21/2013, 10:52 PM
+1 I built a nice size specimen box out of 1/4"clear acrylic, works fast and put very little stress on fish. IMO using a net is about the worst thing you can use.

sevenyearnight
11/21/2013, 11:11 PM
What about using your mouth?
Just kidding.

amlights
12/08/2013, 03:45 PM
Many cichlid traders take pictures of fish in their hands. It helps with giving scale (size) to the fish. It's not a bad practice as long as you know what you're doing... aka no bright flashes or flash at all.

I think a small acclimation box is best, but it's not going to be the rose thing ever either.

dppitone
12/24/2013, 04:08 PM
It's normal for fish veternarians and other types of professionals to hold fish. I once had someone excise a growth from a trigger and he handled it. Whether it's OK? - who's to say but folks with knowledge or opinion. Nonetheless it's done more often than you'd think. As a fisherman, I do it when putting them back in the water.

hogfanreefer
12/25/2013, 10:09 AM
A gloved hand doesn't seem to illicit as much response as a net does. I transfer most of my fish by hand rather than net if possible.