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Smitty750
02/12/2014, 09:05 PM
I'm looking to start another tank but I'd like to use rock that's not taken from an actual ocean reef. I'd like to go green if you will and not contribute to the destruction of natural wonders. I've seen Real Reef rocks but I'm not too sure about the purple color, what else is there?

ReeferBill
02/12/2014, 09:08 PM
You can mix and make your own rocks,check out the forums.

Smitty750
02/12/2014, 09:15 PM
Ya I saw that but I really don't feel like making my own rock haha

acanlover
02/12/2014, 11:11 PM
What about dry rock? Something such as marco rocks. I believe they are taken from a limestone quarry or extinct reef, something along the lines of that in Florida.

clay12340
02/13/2014, 08:52 AM
There is also Bulk Reef Supply's reef saver rock that is quarried. Reef rocks also does the same thing, and you can get 50lb boxes shipped to your door for like $85.

Tampabaysaltwater.com takes quarried rock and puts it in a plot of ocean floor and lets it become live rock over the years. It looks like it has a ton of life on it, comes packed in water, and doesn't harm reefs.

There are also some companies that make custom ceramic rock in the shapes you want. It looks really nice, but I've got no idea what kind of cost is associated.

Smitty750
02/13/2014, 09:32 AM
Thanks a lot guys, appreciate the info

Knightnsd
02/13/2014, 07:39 PM
another eco friendly online site
http://www.liveaquaria.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=393+3122&pcatid=3122

aquaenthusiast
02/13/2014, 08:39 PM
check out ceramic rocks, IMHO the surface area for nitrifying bacteria are going to be much greater within the ceramic rocks than the "real reef" rock , and you can also check out tampa bay saltwater live rock, they mariculture live rock at sites in florida

printerdown01
02/14/2014, 04:34 PM
+1 for reefsaver rock from BRS or from Reef Rocks. Have their product right now and am very impressed. While it is still being harvested from the earth at least it isn't destroying a reef. Out of curiosity is it the dying of the rocks that you don't like from Real Reef Rocks or the color they dyed it?

Smitty750
02/14/2014, 08:23 PM
I'm ok with it coming from the earth I just don't like when a natural reef is destroyed to sell rock. It sort of goes against the very hobby we all love

Timfish
02/14/2014, 09:03 PM
I use a lot of local limestone. It's pretty cheap at $0.10 - $0.20 lb. But before you beat yourself up over using live rock read this report by the UN: http://www.unep.org/PDF/From_Ocean_To_Aquarium_report.pdf From page 9

"The aquarium industry as a whole is of relatively low volume yet very high value, thus potentially providing an incentive to conserve reef habitats and offering a livelihood to coastal communities often living in low-income areas. In 2000, 1 kg of aquarium fish from the Maldives was valued at almost US$500, whereas 1 kg of reef fish harvested for food was worth only US$6. Similarly, the live coral trade is estimated to be worth about US$7,000 per tonne whereas the use of harvested coral for the production of limestone yields only about US$60 per tonne. In Palau, live rock is exported for the aquarium trade at US$2.2 to US$4.4 per kilo whereas it is sold locally as construction material for less than US$0.02 per kilo. Sri Lanka earns about US$5.6 million a year by exporting reef fish to around 52 countries and estimates indicate that 50,000 people are directly involved in the export of marine ornamentals. In the Philippines, about 7,000 collectors depend on the reefs for their livelihood"

Live rock is also a renewable resource being formed in as little as a few years.

reefwiser
02/15/2014, 04:36 AM
All Tampa Bay Saltwater rock is farmed rock.
http://www.tampabaysaltwater.com/

FernandoReef
02/15/2014, 02:01 PM
Ceramic rocks are a good choice, chings using them too.

atreis
02/15/2014, 07:29 PM
Use Texas Holey Rock (dry rock obtained from land), and seed with a small amount of farmed rock (such as that from Tampa Bay Saltwater). It takes a few months, but then you have full tank of live calcium carbonate rock without dye or harming a reef.

syrinx
02/15/2014, 07:30 PM
I look at it this way, If you buy liverock- then you have a chance to save that part of the sea. If you do not buy it- then it will be made into concrete or gravel for the island roads. I am not a big fan of dry rock- or the florida rock. Again to be green- buy pacific liverock from another hobbiest, and thereby recycle it. That way nothing is being removed from land or sea.

Maximus
02/15/2014, 08:24 PM
I highly recommend Vida rock, which is a ceramic rock. I have a 5-6 pieces of the branch and bonsai rock and they look great. You can buy it from here http://aqua-tecture.com/

Da Maui life
02/15/2014, 11:53 PM
I look at it this way, If you buy liverock- then you have a chance to save that part of the sea. If you do not buy it- then it will be made into concrete or gravel for the island roads. I am not a big fan of dry rock- or the florida rock. Again to be green- buy pacific liverock from another hobbiest, and thereby recycle it. That way nothing is being removed from land or sea.

If you buy pacific live rock, from hobbyist or who ever for that matter it had to be removed from the, “land or sea” at some point eh? No roads made from live rock around here. :uzi:

syrinx
02/16/2014, 10:05 AM
Do you need a definition of recycling? Last I checked hawaii wasnt a third world rock exporting country.

atreis
02/17/2014, 05:29 AM
[flamealert]

dc
02/17/2014, 10:36 AM
Ok guys none of this is worth arguing over.

Southern Oak
03/15/2014, 12:29 PM
If you have about a month before you need it, Cermedia (they make MarinePure) is planning to release "rocks" at the end of this month. I got a couple sample rocks from them and they look pretty good. They're a little on the small side as far as reef rocks go, but on the plus side they're lighter than normal rocks and have ridiculous amounts of surface area.

alton
03/25/2014, 06:59 AM
http://sealifeinc.net/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=25&products_id=375&osCsid=cb890b1f5236d63cafd797a3e338b5d5

The link I posted is what I would do if I started a brand new tank.

addo
03/26/2014, 10:51 AM
I use a lot of local limestone. It's pretty cheap at $0.10 - $0.20 lb. But before you beat yourself up over using live rock read this report by the UN: http://www.unep.org/PDF/From_Ocean_To_Aquarium_report.pdf From page 9

"The aquarium industry as a whole is of relatively low volume yet very high value, thus potentially providing an incentive to conserve reef habitats and offering a livelihood to coastal communities often living in low-income areas. In 2000, 1 kg of aquarium fish from the Maldives was valued at almost US$500, whereas 1 kg of reef fish harvested for food was worth only US$6. Similarly, the live coral trade is estimated to be worth about US$7,000 per tonne whereas the use of harvested coral for the production of limestone yields only about US$60 per tonne. In Palau, live rock is exported for the aquarium trade at US$2.2 to US$4.4 per kilo whereas it is sold locally as construction material for less than US$0.02 per kilo. Sri Lanka earns about US$5.6 million a year by exporting reef fish to around 52 countries and estimates indicate that 50,000 people are directly involved in the export of marine ornamentals. In the Philippines, about 7,000 collectors depend on the reefs for their livelihood"

Live rock is also a renewable resource being formed in as little as a few years.

To bad there isn't a "like button" on the forum, but i agree completely :D

jccaclimber
03/29/2014, 10:42 AM
I look at it this way, If you buy liverock- then you have a chance to save that part of the sea. If you do not buy it- then it will be made into concrete or gravel for the island roads. I am not a big fan of dry rock- or the florida rock. Again to be green- buy pacific liverock from another hobbiest, and thereby recycle it. That way nothing is being removed from land or sea.

While I do absolutely believe in sustainable harvest of most things, I'm not sure I buy this argument. That is like looking at a blank concrete wall in a crummy part of town and saying "If you don't put nice looking graffiti on it someone else is just going to come along and put something ugly there."
If I buy live rock from a small island, they aren't going to stop making roads, and I don't think they are going to start importing limestone so they can sell more aquarium rock. If anything the wealth increase from charging more for rock to an outsider vs. less to an insider is going to cause the construction of more roads.
If it gets to the point where conserving their resource (reefs) is worth enough to take on whatever the more expensive alternative is, then it works, but I'm not sure it will get to that point.

The aquarium industry does drive higher prices, but it also drives the harvest of things that would not normally be worth taking, and doesn't have the volume to fully replace current consumption. Say someone discovers that he can sell a fish as food at X or sell it to an aquarist at 10x. He's still going to catch as many as he can. First he will sell the ones at 10x, but whatever stock is left is going to get sold at 1x because he's already caught it and it still has value.

syrinx
03/29/2014, 01:57 PM
I do not mean that the roads will not be built- I am just saying that you can save that little piece of it from becoming a road. You make very good points, and they are true and valid. It is true if we had no demand in the trade, then fish and rock would not be sold to us. But my experience on the islands leads me to believe the harvest would continue for food and resources. The other side of the coin is the lower the standard of living, the more pollution and damage to the reefs. I still believe that getting pacific rock for bio diversity is valid- and trading that rock between aquarists after harvest is green.

E Rosewater
03/29/2014, 04:51 PM
Caribsea had some decent dry rock that is land harvested.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=24528

About $2 a pound.

As far as Reel Reef rock I've said it before, I hate the stuff. Mainly because of price and how dense it is.

atreis
03/30/2014, 06:59 AM
I used the CaribSea rock in my last tank. It worked quite nicely and is good quality.

Scubazaru
03/30/2014, 09:56 AM
I live in Japan, and am an avid scuba diver. I am planning a 75 gallon reef setup and would love nothing more than to take some base rock out and anchor it for about three months or more in order to create some live rock for the aquarium. Time from shore to tank? oh about 20 min. I also plan on using ocean water in my setup. My intent is to run an cycle of live rock in my fuge as well on a 6 month cycle. Thoughts?

atreis
03/30/2014, 05:30 PM
There are companies here in Florida that aquaculture dry rock from land out in the Gulf of Mexico. It works quite well. Can't say I've heard of anyone replacing their rock at such a frequency... I suppose whether or not that's a good idea would depend on the chances of bringing in some undesirable plant or animal along with the rock.

bfin3
04/01/2014, 10:34 PM
Vida rock

Alexraptor
04/02/2014, 08:08 AM
Aquacultured live rock made from limestone makes me think of this.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/Limestone_quarry.jpg

atreis
04/02/2014, 05:26 PM
Most likely that quarry supplies material for crushed gravel for roads and lime for cement. (Besides, the quantity for aquariums would be a tiny fraction of that.) That said, yes, it would come from a quarry of some sort. Consumption does that. The only way to not do that, is to not consume, otherwise whatever your consuming comes from somewhere, and leaves a hole of some sort behind.

Graffiti Reef
04/08/2014, 07:13 PM
I live in Japan, and am an avid scuba diver. I am planning a 75 gallon reef setup and would love nothing more than to take some base rock out and anchor it for about three months or more in order to create some live rock for the aquarium. Time from shore to tank? oh about 20 min. I also plan on using ocean water in my setup. My intent is to run an cycle of live rock in my fuge as well on a 6 month cycle. Thoughts?

Thats actually an awesome idea and I highly approve of this. In fact if I lived close to sea I would do this with all my rock. just watch for hitchhikers and also quarantine that. Come to think of it, since Japan suffered that tragic nuclear incident would that still be wise to do that?

Graffiti Reef
04/08/2014, 07:14 PM
Also, I bought sand from this guy and am thinking about buying some of his shelf rock thats cut flat to make a nice shelf or base.

http://www.marcorocks.com/dry-rock/

hart24601
04/16/2014, 04:42 PM
I love vida rock. It's my "go to" now when starting a tank.