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jadeyy
02/22/2014, 01:07 PM
If always wanted to dive(literally my whole life if been fascinated with the ocean and just water in general, it's like a whole norther world)

But what's is it really like to go scuba diving? I'm guessing its 100% worth the money but what do you personally feel when your diving?

snorvich
02/22/2014, 01:27 PM
It depends to some degree on experience. In the beginning, it feels like a lot of effort to just "stay alive" but once the scuba skills become more intuitive (perhaps after 2-3 hundred dives?), it is very relaxing and fascinating. After a few thousand dives, it is more relaxing than doing almost any other activity. My opinion, your mileage may vary.

jadeyy
02/22/2014, 01:37 PM
Thanks! So I'm guessing you'd say it's completely worth the costs?

snorvich
02/22/2014, 01:42 PM
Thanks! So I'm guessing you'd say it's completely worth the costs?

Well, that depends. In my case, I traveled pretty much over the world diving and costs as a consequence were not trivial. If you can afford it and can do it to the extreme I did, it was worth the cost to me.

ace_92101
02/22/2014, 03:01 PM
Snorvich makes some good points. Like most things, it depends on the person. Having a love for marine aquaria is a natural lead in. As far being comfortable, for most people it does come with experience. I started diving at 12 and it just felt natural. One thing that's often over looked is being comfortable in boats. I've dove with many divers who only get comfortable once they're in the water. Sea sickness is a major reason why some divers stop diving. For those comfortable on boats with a love of marine life, its an amazing hobby.

_divad
02/22/2014, 03:12 PM
I am a very recent scuba certified person. I do it primarily for work. But I do live on the California Coast. I was overwhelmed my first time scuba diving in the ocean. Once I calmed down and just took in everything. It was amazing! I highly suggest doing it.

billsreef
02/22/2014, 06:58 PM
Is it worth it, I think so. Grew up swimming in the ocean, so the only real adjustment was learning not to hold my breath when my head went under :D Once I got past that reflex it was all good. Been diving for a bit over 30 years and it's still my favorite thing to do.

BTW for those that have trouble with boats, there is still beach diving. Haven't seen anyone get sea sick on beach dive ;)

ace_92101
02/22/2014, 07:06 PM
Is it worth it, I think so. Grew up swimming in the ocean, so the only real adjustment was learning not to hold my breath when my head went under :D Once I got past that reflex it was all good. Been diving for a bit over 30 years and it's still my favorite thing to do.

BTW for those that have trouble with boats, there is still beach diving. Haven't seen anyone get sea sick on beach dive ;)

Very well said on beach diving. I'm not sure where the OP lives. SoCal has some very good beach diving. But it's cold!

billsreef
02/22/2014, 07:21 PM
Very well said on beach diving. I'm not sure where the OP lives. SoCal has some very good beach diving. But it's cold!

Gulf Stream is much warmer than the Humboldt Current :D

r-balljunkie
02/23/2014, 12:25 PM
diving is bliss, nirvana, one hour underwater "experience"
once you are certified, it stays with you for life so go for it!

even a "bad" dive is a good dive. regarding the costs, yes it can be expensive when you add up the equipment, which you have the option to rent.



Snorvich summed it up well, three lines or less regarding the comfort levels.

Lordhelmet
02/24/2014, 06:39 PM
BTW for those that have trouble with boats, there is still beach diving. Haven't seen anyone get sea sick on beach dive ;)

I once got sea sick on a beach dive on a very rough day at Monastary Beach in Carmel, it was also one of the best (and coldest) dives i have ever done.
Diving is a natural extension of reef keeping, totally worth it IMO.

billsreef
02/24/2014, 07:15 PM
I once got sea sick on a beach dive on a very rough day at Monastary Beach in Carmel, it was also one of the best (and coldest) dives i have ever done.
Diving is a natural extension of reef keeping, totally worth it IMO.

Your first person I've ever known to get sea sick on a beach dive :eek2:

If I'm ever on a boat with you, be sure you stay on the leeward side of me :D

bonsai4tim
02/24/2014, 07:16 PM
Just got certified last year, at my wifes prompting. Starting out, we have mostly done guided and/or shallow dives. Its like visiting your LFS without the tanks---fish and coral, adults protecting eggs, the occasional turtle or cowfish.

We did our class inland in North Carolina, Certification dive was in a quarry (cold), BUT the diving in the quarry made tropical dives so much easier.

Most of the time feels like you are hovering watching all the fish, not really swimming much at all. NC coastal dives can be work, the the dives we have been on in the florida keys were shallow easy dives with minimal swimming.

Most of our dive class could barely swim the 200 yard qualifying swim, and most of the people we see on dive trips look way more out of shape than us. (neoprene vs "bio-prene" insulation)

Knightnsd
02/25/2014, 08:33 PM
It is like swimming in your tank, is all I can say, I love Hawaii and have some fish from there. Every time I am there I spend most of it under water. My fiance even snorkels now, only thing that got me out of the water last year was a tiger shark. I will be back in May to see it all over again and my fiance even bought me a dive trip already for my birthday last week. Diving is like expanding your aquarium tank to beyond any dreamed of size and housing all the fish and corals you could ever want in it.

ChadRaay86
02/26/2014, 04:05 AM
Its like being an Astronaut. I'm an avid cave diver, spearfisher, wreck diver, free diver and Ocean lover. I feel at home in the water and it is an incredibly peaceful experience to feel all alone (even with your dive buddy) in a multitude of different environments.

RedStangGA
02/26/2014, 05:14 AM
It's a short escape to absolute bliss. No talking, cell phones ringing, or kids crying(even my own lol!). Distractions are pretty much all of the good kind.

I will say I don't think you need several hundred dives to get comfortable. That will be person by person and will also depend on the type of diving you do. For instance I would never be comfortable cave diving. That's just me. Reef diving in the Caribbean though? No worries! The great thing is my wife and I are both certified so we get to go together. I just wish we lived closer to the ocean.

Cu455
02/26/2014, 01:16 PM
Its hard to explain. If you really want to know how it feels do it. The silence, effortlessly moving and the ability to move in so many directions (such as up and down). I also think its awesome to see how the fish react. Some fish are curious and will come up to you, but the majority of the time they just won't notice you.

It will also give you a new perspective on fish and appropriate aquarium sizes.

billdogg
02/26/2014, 02:00 PM
I learned to swim in Lake Erie in the early 60's, when the water was mud brown and you had to watch out for the dead fish floating around. I was alway a bit afraid of what was below the surface.

I was introduced to scuba through Jacques Cousteau, and my uncle, who owned the first scube shop in the Columbus, Ohio Area.

When I finally got around to getting certified I was a bit uncertain about how I would react under water. Within 5 minutes of the first time I had a tank on my back, I was at the bottom blowing bubble rings to the surface.

Now, when I'm doing my safety stops at the end of my dives, I have a tendency to fall asleep, especially in the Ohio Quarries where I do much of my diving. (I'm in a drysuit, so I'm toasty warm!)

It is, by far, my favorite way to spend a day (or night). I encourage everybody who shows any interest at all to take the plunge!!!

When

Speckled Grouper
03/02/2014, 09:31 PM
My only regret: Why didn't I do this sooner?"

It is the most wonderful experience, you feel no aches or pains and to be able to admire the animals in their natural habitat is priceless....

Lordhelmet
03/02/2014, 11:19 PM
Your first person I've ever known to get sea sick on a beach dive :eek2:

If I'm ever on a boat with you, be sure you stay on the leeward side of me :D

Oh man, I get sea sick easy. I start my anti nausea routine the night before.

snorvich
03/03/2014, 12:09 PM
For many people eating ginger cookies tend to retard getting sea sick. Or so they say . . .

:spin3:

bla403
03/03/2014, 01:43 PM
I agree with the person that said "I wish I did this earlier". I started diving around 5 years ago at age 25 and wish I started earlier.

As far as the experience, one of the factors that effects this is how close you are with swimming/water. My family introduced me to swimming as an infant and I grew up with it so I am very comfortable in a pool or the ocean. My wife is the opposite as she started later in life so she was terrified when I tried to get her to scuba dive with me and I think all hopes are lost on that.

I am extremely relaxed when I am diving and just want to enjoy everything around me. Its so peaceful down there for me and I just want to see new things and explore. This isnt the same for others as I have seen many people be forced to come up very early since they get nervous, breath heavily and go through air in a way I can't understand.

If you think snorkeling is cool, Scuba is way better. More relaxing, more oppurtunity to look at stuff up close, no need to compete with waves and get thrown around, etc.

snorvich
03/03/2014, 04:36 PM
If you think snorkeling is cool, Scuba is way better. More relaxing, more oppurtunity to look at stuff up close, no need to compete with waves and get thrown around, etc.

Absolutely. And no sunburn issues to worry about. Some people who have claustrophobia seem to have difficulties with scuba.

hcl2195
03/03/2014, 08:00 PM
A bad day of diving sure beats the hell out of a good day at work!! Just wish I had more time to go diving.

DaveG99
03/03/2014, 08:46 PM
When I go diving it's the most peaceful and relaxing feeling in the world. I have been diving since 1992. It's my happy place.

mayjong
03/03/2014, 11:00 PM
If you like snorkling, you will love diving

Zoodiver
03/04/2014, 12:20 PM
A bad day of diving sure beats the hell out of a good day at work!! Just wish I had more time to go diving.


I dive for work. :headwalls:

Actually, I love being underwater (when I'm not on the clock). It's a totally different thing when you HAVE to dive because there is work to do once you get down.

Recreational diving is amazing. My daughter told me "You're like Peter Pan and get to fly over everything".

hogfanreefer
03/08/2014, 10:10 PM
I just finished my classroom and confined water dives 2 weeks ago. It was a blast even in just a 15' deep pool. Seemed very natural to both my wife and I. We will go to Vortex Springs, FL week after next to do our open water dives. Can't wait.

My only regret so far is waiting till I was 57 to start!

snorvich
03/09/2014, 11:15 AM
I just finished my classroom and confined water dives 2 weeks ago. It was a blast even in just a 15' deep pool. Seemed very natural to both my wife and I. We will go to Vortex Springs, FL week after next to do our open water dives. Can't wait.

My only regret so far is waiting till I was 57 to start!

Well, on some of my live aboard dive trips, there were a fair number of folks in their 80's. As such, you have a lot of years to enjoy.

NatureNerd
03/11/2014, 12:52 AM
If you like snorkling, you will love diving

I love both but have taken to snorkling more lately. I like the unlimited amount of time in the water, and I hate carrying diving gear. If only I could hold my breadth for longer. :(

RedStangGA
03/11/2014, 06:56 AM
Snorkeling is too much work lol! Nothing beats a vacation where we can dive. Just needs the kids old enough to get certified so we can have family fun.

Paul B
03/11/2014, 07:10 AM
Well, on some of my live aboard dive trips, there were a fair number of folks in their 80's. As such, you have a lot of years to enjoy.

I am not that far from being one of those old coots on a dive boat. :lol:

Diving opens you up to an entire new world, literally. Many places you go to are kind of boring unless you get under the water. I remember Aruba for instance. That is just a desert but the diving is pretty good there.
Bora Bora has almost nothing on land as it is just a small, round Island with one road, but the diving is the best I have ever done.
My first dive was on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and I was hooked.
So when you decide to go someplace you can decide on the land activities as well as the under water stuff.
It even changed my life for many years as I used to always go fishing with my friends on our boats, after we started diving, that is what we did every weekend for many years and it was extreamly enjoyable. :dance:

Zoodiver
03/12/2014, 08:43 AM
I just finished my classroom and confined water dives 2 weeks ago. It was a blast even in just a 15' deep pool. Seemed very natural to both my wife and I. We will go to Vortex Springs, FL week after next to do our open water dives. Can't wait.

My only regret so far is waiting till I was 57 to start!

A friend of mine hung up his fins after doing a dive on his 90th birthday.
You still have 33 years to go!

rssjsb
03/12/2014, 10:03 AM
Absolutely. And no sunburn issues to worry about. Some people who have claustrophobia seem to have difficulties with scuba. I've always been a little claustrophobic, but that's never been an issue for me with diving. I think it's like when I learned to drive a car. So much stuff to learn, and it's easy to get wigged out about it because the consequences of getting it wrong are scary. At some point, though, the equipment gets to be more intuitive and you can just marvel at the scenery. There's nothing quite like that weightless bliss.

Molly1414
03/18/2014, 10:51 PM
I would recommend a discover scuba class in a warm water dive location like Hawaii or Bonaire. You take a short class, watch some videos and do some pool dives. If you like that they will then take you in the ocean for two supervised dives with a dive master next to you. We did that and it got us hooked.

TFP Marine Biologist
03/20/2014, 01:17 PM
The hard part is getting to the point where you can relax, and breath normally. Once you get there, SCUBA is the one of the most amazing experiences you will ever have. I started Snorkeling when I was 5 years old, and spent time in the water whenever I could, and did not get SCUBA certified until I was in college, for me, it was and easy transition, and by the time I got to my open water certification I was good. Some of the folks who were on my open water trip, not so much, they never got to the point where they could relax and never even made it underwater.

I have been diving for over 20 years, and have worked at an aquarium were I did hundreds of dives, and also volunteered for a SCUBA center during college, that allowed me to go on many off shore trips in South Carolina. Everyone's experience is different when they get into diving, it is not for everyone, but in my opinion it is worth trying if you have the interest, and can make the commitment to take the classes and do it properly.

snorvich
03/24/2014, 04:19 PM
I have been diving for over 20 years, and have worked at an aquarium were I did hundreds of dives, and also volunteered for a SCUBA center during college, that allowed me to go on many off shore trips in South Carolina.

Were you looking for sand tiger sharks?

TFP Marine Biologist
03/25/2014, 09:18 AM
Were you looking for sand tiger sharks?

Never actually saw any big sharks on all the dives I did in SC, even on some of the deep wrecks that are notorious for them, only shadows in the distance. Lots of really big barracuda, they gather under the boats above the wrecks, because people fish in the same spots that we dive. It takes a little getting used to having a large group of 5-6' barracuda hanging out with you face to face while you are doing your safety stop.

Paul B
03/25/2014, 09:57 AM
In the Caribbean you rarely see anything larger than a couple of feet except maybe a parrotfish or a sleepy nurse shark.
In the South pacific like here in Bora Bora, you can't get away from them and you have to be careful jumping off the boat that you don't land on one as they are curious.
On this dive we were always surrounded by 10 or 15 black tip reef sharks with large lemon sharks in the distance. There were so many sharks that they got in front of the camera and it was hard to get decent pictures of the more interesting manta rays.
Even if you are standing on an Atoll it is like in the cartoons where you see shark fins all around you.
We rented some tiny boats to go out and feed sting rays, but someone had to stand there and throw fish to the sharks to keep them from coming in close and trying to take the fish out of your hand (along with possibly your hand as they are large)
The guy threw a fish in the water and a bird came in to take the fish, a shark came up and took the bird and the fish. That's why I am disillusioned now with Caribbean diving. The South Pacific spoiled me.

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh270/urchsearch/Guppies.jpg (http://s258.photobucket.com/user/urchsearch/media/Guppies.jpg.html)

This is a lagoon in Bora Bora where they filmed "Mutiny on the Bounty" That is our ship in the middle.
http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh270/urchsearch/CopyofTahiti047.jpg (http://s258.photobucket.com/user/urchsearch/media/CopyofTahiti047.jpg.html)

snorvich
03/25/2014, 11:19 AM
Yes, the South Pacific will do that; spoil you that is. Yet, around St. Vincent I saw more frogfish than any other place in the Caribbean because they are not eaten. (No green morays though) Best weird critters was found in Lembeh straits in Indonesia and Batangas in the Philippines, best large animals, galapagos, but northern Papua New Guinea was right up there.

Paul B
03/26/2014, 05:20 AM
Best weird critters was found in Lembeh straits in Indonesia and Batangas

The best wierd creatures I see are near my Daughter's house in the West Village in Lower Manhattan.

snorvich
03/26/2014, 11:31 AM
The best wierd creatures I see are near my Daughter's house in the West Village in Lower Manhattan.

ROTFLMAO. I am sure that is true!!!

tkeracer619
04/15/2014, 05:43 PM
I'm on my second year as a certified diver. On my 5th open water dive ever I helped rescue a panic stricken diver in 30ft of water. She survived. On my 15th dive ever we "misplaced" a diver for an hour but he was found about a mile north of us...

Both of those situations sorta tossed me in the deep end out of the gate. I am now motivated to pursue my rescue diver certification and have also learned what not to do from others actions first hand.

Whats it like? Well, its probably easier to image like space. You are out of your element so whatever street cred you have at home is useless. You feel extremely vulnerable at first, especially when you come face to face with sealife as big as you are that has teeth the size of your middle finger. You now realize what it must be like for that little copopod trying to survive in your tank.

That soon gives way to relaxation and excitement. For me this happened after that 5th dive. Knowing that all those little things I took seriously in class actually worked I think made my subconscious a little more comfy. This year I was swimming around upside down, sideways, staying level, and able to work on breathing exercises to extend my bottom time. I was able to focus on marine life. Film some cool stuff. I was not always the first up and out of air. It is spectacular and I plan on getting into re-breathing setups after a while. On one of our dives we dropped two divers off and didn't see them for almost 4 hours. They were just sitting on a ledge watching what comes by in the deep blue for the whole time, must be amazing!

I am what they call a Dramamine diver. I have to take 24h Dramamine the night before and 1 hour before I get to the dock. If I don't, I'm chumming that water. If I do, no problems. If you are on a boat AND you get sick let them know but jump back into the water. The sickness will be gone by the time your feet touch the water.

Is it worth it? Heck yea! Every penny. It may change some opinions you have with keeping saltwater tanks.

Plus, how the heck else are you going to experience stuff like this if you're not certified?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDVLPSnjjZI


Some advice I got that I believe has helped me out was initially to invest in a few things...

-Classroom and pool dives on the weekends, not vacation. Open water dives on vacation, you get 4 dives and equipment for cheap compared to normal.
-My own mask and snorkel. Price is irrelevant, how it fits is important.
-My own fins. The more relaxed you are the longer your air will last. Having some high end fins that will help you move through the water easier then heavy duty rentals will go a long way in saving air. If you don't want to run out so quick, buy some nice fins. Side effect is you better really be in good shape or you won't be able to walk the day after a long swim.
-My own booties, my own gloves, and my own dive computer. I picked up a Suunto Zoop used in pool training for under $200. This tool isn't required but most all divers will have one. It makes keeping detailed logs and profiles easy plus its nice to dive with two and hopefully the rental gear will come with its own.
-A safety sausage!
-A cheep shorty wetsuit for fishing (snorkeling) afterwards... My routine in Maui is usually... Dive at 5:30am, snack, remove some tan lines, eat a fish taco for lunch, snorkel till 3, margaritas till sunset under palms. :) I am in the water probably 5 hours a day.

Saltliquid
04/19/2014, 07:24 AM
When scuba diving for the first few dives, you experience extreme claustrophobia and as you go deeper then 30 to 40 feet, usually by 70 feet the way the pressure and the changes upon gases with in you, impacting on you over all and changes your ways of thinking and also the change in how you perceive things is quite daunting initially, then as time goes on you are reminded that this world you are in wants you dead and all around you as you look closely, it is all about kill of be killed.
The extreme beauty that is all around you is so diverse it can become quite breath taking, especially if you keep a reef tank at home, this allows you to recognise what many sports divers have no idea that they just put their fin on it.
Some times you might experience thermo clines, usually at the 60 to 80m feet mark appearing before you as a blurring of the waters, this is because of two completely different waters under the other. If you can balance your BCD you can literally hover then reach through this zone of maybe 25c where you are through to the next at times being down to 13c, now that’s an experience.
Over my 40 plus years of scuba and free diving getting my FAUI ticket in 1970, twice now the ocean by a second or two,very nearly killed me, and quite close, it is to many times to mention.
Sharks are nothing compared to the current, long spined sea urchins and poisonous creatures.
It takes some time to find your way with this sport due to all of us reacting to how the ocean impacts on our minds and bodies so very differently, but when you can remain vigilant while semi relaxing down there and except that it is out to take your life if you are silly enough, then can enjoy being a scuba diver.

r-balljunkie
04/19/2014, 07:43 AM
Last dive, it was trigger mating season. Nothing like an 18" titan swimming towards you. Screw the sharks.

snorvich
04/19/2014, 10:15 AM
Last dive, it was trigger mating season. Nothing like an 18" titan swimming towards you. Screw the sharks.

Amen to that. I have one chase me for 100 yards. I tried to beat him (her?) off with my camera equipment to no avail. Never an issue with sharks, I have encountered sharks many times (usually shark tails).

Nina51
04/21/2014, 10:52 AM
diving is something i have wanted to do from the time i was a child. pretty sure i was switched at birth because not a single person in my immediate family showed any sort of interest in it (or any other hobby i wanted to try, for that matter).

now i'm old with fake body parts so i will live vicariously through you guys!

snorvich
04/21/2014, 06:18 PM
diving is something i have wanted to do from the time i was a child. pretty sure i was switched at birth because not a single person in my immediate family showed any sort of interest in it (or any other hobby i wanted to try, for that matter).

now i'm old with fake body parts so i will live vicariously through you guys!

Well, on some of my liveaboard trips we had folks in their 70's and 80's who partook in the diving.

Nina51
04/22/2014, 06:52 AM
i have friends who go to balize a couple of times a year. had many chances to go with them but my then-husband got seasick just looking at their underwater videos so it was something we just never did. i am full of regret.

now that it's just me, 2 danes and 4 pot bellied pigs, it's almost impossible for me to get away from home for more than a day or two. don't even get me started on the hassle it is to go through airport security with tin hips!! hehe

r-balljunkie
04/22/2014, 10:38 PM
.......... with fake body parts so i will live vicariously through you guys!

one of my dive buddies has a titanium / carbon fiber leg.

no favoritism....he hauls his own gear and gets up and down the ladder like the rest of us.

c

Nina51
04/26/2014, 06:44 PM
but, is your dive buddy 187 years old? *sigh*

woodnaquanut
04/27/2014, 10:43 AM
but, is your dive buddy 187 years old? *sigh*

Did you know that there is a rule on dive boats? 150+ y/o dive for free! :)

Wonderful thing about diving is once you are in the water you are weightless. As long as you are reasonably fit and don't rust you'll have a great time.

Find a pig/dog sitter and then get wet!!

Paul B
04/27/2014, 10:57 AM
You are weightless except if you dive here in New York with 37 lbs of weight on your waist, then your legs and head are weightless while your belly tries to sink and the weights tend to bend you in half the wrong way.

Reefdiver77
04/28/2014, 11:31 PM
I decided at the age of 10, shortly after JFK dedicated the dam on Greers Ferry Lake in AR (one of the last ceremonies prior to his asasination), that I wanted to be a diver "when I grew up". I witnessed divers diving shortly after the lake was open. They were bringing up all sorts of neat things. Fast forward 13 years. As a newlywed, I twisted my husbands arm to get certified. We were NASDS certified in 1977 by Doug McNeese (Junior as we called him),who went to high school with us. His family owned the Dive Shop in Memphis. He is currently owner of SSI. We have been diving together 37 years and married 39 years in June. Diving is my passion. I live for my vacations every summer. All of them have to involve diving. I feel very free and weightless and very much at peace. I am so peaceful at my safety stop at 15 ft. looking down to the bottom and up at the sky. When I do mental imagery, in an attempt to relax, this is what I imagine. I actually cry into my mask at the safety stop on my last dive our last vacation of the year, because I know it will be 9 months until we dive again. So yes, it has been worth every minute and every penny!! We have gone from horse collar bc, no auto inflators, no computers, no octopus rigs to what we have now. We are now 60 and are eagerly awaiting our trip to the Florida Panhandle June 28 for 2 weeks followed by another week at the end of August. Jump in, you will not regret it!!

thenewguy997
05/06/2014, 03:10 AM
Is it bad for your lungs?

r-balljunkie
05/06/2014, 04:20 AM
Is it bad for your lungs?

not particularly, even if you dive blended or trimix gasses (helium, nitrogen, oxygen) in more advanced "technical" diving IF you stick to your training.

repetitive deep dives however are not good for your joints, and can lead to early onset of arthritis. How deep?? 250 to 500+ feet dives.


dont worry, 99% of dives are within the recreational limits and you shouldn't see any physiological lasting effects.

jump in and enjoy.

Saltliquid
05/06/2014, 05:21 AM
Is it bad for your lungs?

If you change depths with out normal breathing, then yes!
Some people with a lung wall weakness and it is common, if you change depths quickly and sort of breath slowly and if you maybe change depths quickly by chasing something to catch or to get a pic of it, this forces some air through the membrane of your lungs and up next to the oesophagus it goes and can choke you.
I take this risk all the time as I skip breath a great deal, lucky I know what I am doing even if it is supposedly the wrong thing to do while breathing under water.
One of our local commercial collectors we knew well use to deco on pure oxygen, he was down for ever each day and had hip and shoulder joint replacements by 45, so much necrosis its not funny.

thenewguy997
05/06/2014, 01:04 PM
Crazy lol. I just asked bc i plan to scuba in my lifetime and was watching a reef show and they said something about how if you dont do something right your lung could burst or something liks that

TFP Marine Biologist
05/06/2014, 01:11 PM
If you do not breath properly you can put yourself at risk of expansion injuries. The gas you breath at depth is compressed, and you are under pressure also. As you rise in the water column the pressure is reduced, and the gas in your lungs expands, so holding your breath, or rapidly rising without exhaling is dangerous.

billsreef
05/06/2014, 07:46 PM
The key to safe diving is get trained, and stick to your diving. Been diving over 30 years, the most dangerous part of any dive is the drive to get where I'm diving ;)

Saltliquid
05/07/2014, 01:00 AM
Crazy lol. I just asked bc i plan to scuba in my lifetime and was watching a reef show and they said something about how if you dont do something right your lung could burst or something liks that

That can lead to an embolism or what I typed previously, my brother died from an embolism from a scuba accident in 73. Scuba is extremely safe, but he was very inexperienced and to me even with the loss of his life and nearly my own a few times, for a good complete life, this sport should be experienced!

Paul B
05/08/2014, 01:04 PM
Been diving over 30 years, the most dangerous part of any dive is the drive to get where I'm diving

Hey Bill, this I agree with. I have been diving since 1971 and I never got hurt diving other than a few lobster bites. I was scared once or twice though, Once off Execution Lighthouse when a cormorant (bird) must of mistook me for a sardine and crashed into me wrapping his 4' wings around my head while flapping in the zero visability water.

There he is on the right looking all innocent. Harold, I think that was his name.

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh270/urchsearch/ExecutionLighthouse002.jpg (http://s258.photobucket.com/user/urchsearch/media/ExecutionLighthouse002.jpg.html)

Nina51
05/08/2014, 06:13 PM
Did you know that there is a rule on dive boats? 150+ y/o dive for free! :)

Wonderful thing about diving is once you are in the water you are weightless. As long as you are reasonably fit and don't rust you'll have a great time.

Find a pig/dog sitter and then get wet!!

well, now you have given me something to seriously think about! how do you feel about giant dogs and muddy pigs? i would pay you tree fiddy a day if you come and take care of farm stuff for me. :)

Paul B
05/08/2014, 06:46 PM
I never knew that rule about dive boats.
But I normally dive off my own boat so I can use that rule for myself and dive for free.
Of course I never charged myself and used to pay myself in lobsters, flounders and sea urchins. :D

billsreef
05/08/2014, 07:47 PM
Got to watch out for those Cormorants :D Never had one hit me, but they do look cool when they dive down right in front of you.

Paul B
05/08/2014, 08:33 PM
Bill you are used to that eastern Long Island diving, that is like the Caribbean, here in the western sound all I could see was the foot of that thing, the rest of it was flapping around my head. I thought it was the Loch Ness monster and for all I know, it was. :hmm2:

judin2117
05/21/2014, 11:58 AM
diving is what pushed me into having a tank, i just had to have a small piece of it with me everyday since i dont live close to the ocean. Comfort def depends on the person. I have done alot of caverns and dont really like the overhead so i tend to suck a tank fast, but put me in a lake or a reef and i relax and get caught up in the amazing world that lies beneath the surface. If you like your tank you will love reef diving.