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View Full Version : DOS pump release date?


kurfer
11/18/2014, 08:15 AM
Hello I've been looking at your website almost daily wondering when the release dates going to be officially set for this product. Do you all have any info that it's gonna be released in the next few weeks? I am chomping at the bit for a dosing solution for two part and would love to hold out for this product especially since it interacts with my apex.

kenargo
11/18/2014, 05:32 PM
Getting close, but no official date yet.

LinkinReef
11/23/2014, 07:47 AM
Wondering the same thing

Adamc1303
12/17/2014, 03:36 PM
Anyone?

aleithol
12/17/2014, 04:50 PM
Over on Neptune Systems Community forums, some people in the U.S. are reporting shipments within the last couple of days.

Raul-7
12/17/2014, 04:53 PM
Over on Neptune Systems Community forums, some people in the U.S. are reporting shipments within the last couple of days.

True. (https://forum.neptunesystems.com/showthread.php?8264-Neptune-DoS&p=58314&viewfull=1#post58314)

LinkinReef
12/17/2014, 05:04 PM
BRS already has them in stock and shipping today

Mistersponge
12/17/2014, 11:29 PM
Soooooo looking at one for auto water changes. Anyone know what line I would require as I would be drawing and sending the saltwater to the basement.

aleithol
12/18/2014, 06:22 AM
Suggest you (and others) head over to Neptune Systems Community forums (https://forum.neptunesystems.com/forum.php). Far more activity and detail on everything Apex and DoS there. Do a quick search on "DoS" and you'll find two threads HERE (https://forum.neptunesystems.com/showthread.php?7596-D%26%23332%3BS-%96-Dosing-and-Fluid-Metering-System) and HERE (https://forum.neptunesystems.com/showthread.php?8264-Neptune-DoS) containing what official and speculative tidbits there is beyond the official Neptune DoS Website (https://www.neptunesystems.com/dos/), including some comments in the last few weeks on tubing types, tolerances, challenges with some tubing that may seem like it's the right size but may prove to be too-thick/thin, when Neptune may make accessory tubing of their own available, etc.

Raul-7
12/18/2014, 10:35 AM
I wouldn't use this for WC's - too expensive to have these pumps running continuous. I'd invest in BoB with a low [submerged] and normal level float. Use centrifugal pumps; much more robust, cheaper and longer lasting.

Pacific Sun understands that hence why they released the DC pumps for WCs and don't rely on the peristaltic pumps.

Mistersponge
12/18/2014, 02:41 PM
I wouldn't use this for WC's - too expensive to have these pumps running continuous. I'd invest in BoB with a low [submerged] and normal level float. Use centrifugal pumps; much more robust, cheaper and longer lasting.

Pacific Sun understands that hence why they released the DC pumps for WCs and don't rely on the peristaltic pumps.
I'm not familiar with BoB? Will those pumps push 15 ft head? Also are you referring to initial cost or the electric bill?

aleithol
12/18/2014, 03:57 PM
BoB typically means Break Out Box in Apex terms. It's an optional item you can connect to a controller and the PMx modules allowing you to connect things like float switches such that your Apex can see when they go on or off and your programming can take action.

TerenceF
12/18/2014, 04:44 PM
I wouldn't use this for WC's - too expensive to have these pumps running continuous. I'd invest in BoB with a low [submerged] and normal level float. Use centrifugal pumps; much more robust, cheaper and longer lasting.

Pacific Sun understands that hence why they released the DC pumps for WCs and don't rely on the peristaltic pumps.

Raul, I will respectfully disagree.

First of all, these pumps do not need to run continuous to do a water change. The pumps run at up to 250ml/min. This means that even with a 1/3 duty cycle the pump will do over a gallon an hour. Most aquariums will not need to pump more than 10-20 gallons a week for a water change.

The reason the Pacific Sun uses a different pump is because their dosing system uses a light-duty peristaltic pump whereas the DOS uses a stepper-motor driven industrial peristaltic pump.

Centrifugal pumps with float switches are a far more risky solution. Those inexpensive pumps tend to fail, and should a float switch have an issue mechanically or electrically you could have a real disaster.

With the DOS, you can simply set the volume and because it is stepper motor driven, it is super accurate and you can take out the exact same amount that you put in.

I only wanted to respond here so that everyone can take a closer look here and understand that just as two return pumps that use the same theory to move water does not make them the same, it also goes for peristaltic pumps.

TerenceF
12/18/2014, 04:45 PM
I'm not familiar with BoB? Will those pumps push 15 ft head? Also are you referring to initial cost or the electric bill?

The DOS pumps will push >20', those tiny little pumps he is referring to will be lucky to push 7'

Raul-7
12/18/2014, 05:22 PM
I'm not familiar with BoB? Will those pumps push 15 ft head? Also are you referring to initial cost or the electric bill?

As he mentioned it's the breakout box, it allows you connect 6 float switches to control whatever you desire. So you have it like GHL Profilux automates waterchanges. One sensor at the bottom of your sump and one sensor at the top; the pumps are then programmed to remove water until it reaches the bottom sensor and another pump to fill until it reaches the top sensor.

Expensive in terms of the life of the motors is 5000 hours. Max speed is 250mL/min; so 4 minutes = 1 liter of water. I guess if you change 1-5% a day it's fine. But I'd still like to rely on centrifugal pumps since they last longer and are cheaper to replace.

Raul, I will respectfully disagree.

First of all, these pumps do not need to run continuous to do a water change. The pumps run at up to 250ml/min. This means that even with a 1/3 duty cycle the pump will do over a gallon an hour. Most aquariums will not need to pump more than 10-20 gallons a week for a water change.

The reason the Pacific Sun uses a different pump is because their dosing system uses a light-duty peristaltic pump whereas the DOS uses a stepper-motor driven industrial peristaltic pump.

Centrifugal pumps with float switches are a far more risky solution. Those inexpensive pumps tend to fail, and should a float switch have an issue mechanically or electrically you could have a real disaster.

With the DOS, you can simply set the volume and because it is stepper motor driven, it is super accurate and you can take out the exact same amount that you put in.

I only wanted to respond here so that everyone can take a closer look here and understand that just as two return pumps that use the same theory to move water does not make them the same, it also goes for peristaltic pumps.

Let's assume something goes wrong in the tank, fish start dieing and you need to do 50% WCs. Like Slief, when his son poured bleach in his tank, he was lucky he had a Genesis system installed because it was able to change out massive amounts of water in such a short time. And it was automated, allowing him to focus on other tasks like adding carbon, Seachem Prime, etc.

Similarly, if I want to automate everything - I'll think of the worst possible scenario. Now the DoS is only able to pull out 15 liters [~4 gallons] every hour; that's simply not enough assuming I want to change a lot of water in such a short time.

Mistersponge
12/18/2014, 05:59 PM
Lol break out box, I own one. I'll keep an eye on the dos, I'm interested and my water comes from the basement so peristaltic pumps are perfect.

TerenceF
12/18/2014, 06:29 PM
Now the DoS is only able to pull out 15 liters [~4 gallons] every hour; that's simply not enough assuming I want to change a lot of water in such a short time.

For these kinds of situations I always have 40-50 gallons saltwater ready to go. I also have a 1200g/h pump and an empty brute. I have a 1.5" hose I use to syphon and in a few minutes its handled.

Those tiny little pumps from Pacific Sun are not going to help that much in your hypothetical. Especially when they have so little head pressure. Again, the reason they offer them is because the tiny little peristaltic pumps they use would wear out in no time moving that amount of water every week.

The idea behind using the DOS for ongoing and automatic water change is simply to both make things a bit easier, and also to have less of a shock to the system as you slowly changeover the water.

Raul-7
12/18/2014, 06:35 PM
True, I'm not bashing the DoS system at all. I'm just debating is it worth it to task such an expensive unit with WCs; when it can be done cheaper with a BoB and centrifugal pumps.

It's probably the best dosing pump on the market; but it's expensive if a person needs more than one unit (ie. assume I need one unit for WCs and one for dosing) - that's $700 for 4 dosing heads.

TerenceF
12/18/2014, 09:40 PM
Point taken Raul. Yes, using the centrifugal pumps will work. But people should be aware of the limitations. Things like the head pressure limitation and another one, back siphon, is another reason to have issue with that solution.

Indeed the DOS is a premium solution with a premium price. It is simply my job to make sure that people understand the differences. No one would say that a MaxiJet and a Vortech do the same thing or have the same quality or lifespan and one is 10x the price of the other.

If you have a premium reef with lots of $ in livestock, it is often not wise to scrimp. $700 is less than the cost of one of the most popular premium LED lights.