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View Full Version : Breeding fish to be...feeder fish?


ichthyogeek
08/20/2015, 12:44 AM
So...hear me out here people. Damselfish (Chrysiptera mainly), spawn easily, and according to MOFIB, tend to be relatively middling to raise (something along the lines of dottyback raising). They also produce a crap ton of eggs every spawn, every 7 days. So...using as cheap of a method as possible to get post-meta juvies, it's very hard to sell damsels for a profit. However, what about selling damsels as feeder fish? From looking at one of the stickies in the "large and aggressive" forum, it seems that reef fish (like damsels) are less fatty option foods for larger fish (like groupers) instead of pelagic fish that wouldn't normally be found in a reef (like silversides).
Obviously there's the culls in any batch that can be feeder fish, but with large fish, 10 to 20 culls per spawn can either be way too much, or way too little.

So, what are y'alls thoughts about this? Do you think there's a large enough interest in providing more suitable live saltwater foods to break even?

shifty51008
08/20/2015, 03:51 AM
I doubt youll break even, lets go with clownfish, i sell 50 a week per store at $6.00 per fish and i make just enough to make a lil bit of extra. They sell them for $20.00 ea. Now those are just standard ocy clowns, nothing fancy. Now they sell damsels at $4.00 ea so i am sure they will only buy them for $.50 ea. You will have a hard time breaking even at that lil bit imo

Lrood
08/20/2015, 02:58 PM
Are they really that easy to raise? While there are documented reporgs of successes, I have never read any reports of hobbyist breeders successfully raising them. From the journal reports I have read, the larvae are very tiny, and likely would require pelagic (calanoid) copepod nauplii as first foods.

billsreef
08/21/2015, 09:25 AM
By the time you grow the rotifers and the fish, you'll never be able to sell at feeder price prices and make money. Much better to go with something even easier such as saltwater mollies or gambusia that are livebearers.