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karimwassef
11/12/2015, 09:28 PM
I lost a small pair of "stainless steel" coral clippers a few weeks ago. I thought I had just misplaced it.

After my last business trip, I found it trapped against the back PVC in my overflow. It was badly corroded, so clearly not a very good grade of SS.

During the period between losing and finding it, I saw a measurable increase in pod activity and coral expansion. Is there a connection? Is the iron turning into rust potentially good for a reef? Or just a coincidence?

I have a GFO, so I already have iron oxide. But that's already oxidized.

This is iron becoming oxidized in the water.

disc1
11/12/2015, 10:29 PM
This is iron becoming oxidized in the water.


Yes, and any other metals in the SS. Some good and some very very very bad.

karimwassef
11/12/2015, 10:52 PM
so it happens to be a good mix?

rt67ghy
11/13/2015, 03:52 AM
The iron would contribute to phytoplankton growth assuming there is no limiting factors such as insufficient manganese and nitrates. The corals and copepods would benefit from the extra phytoplankaton in the water column.

dartier
11/13/2015, 04:02 AM
I think what David is alluding to is that the stainless steel alloy can have other metals in it like copper.

Dennis

karimwassef
11/13/2015, 06:36 AM
Sure, but given that things have gotten better, not worse, I would say that this particular pair of clippers didn't have significant traces of copper?

Has anyone tried adding high purity iron (to be safe) metal to a reef?

jimmyj7090
11/13/2015, 06:46 AM
Some discussion and a link to a simple DIY recipe.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1807946

disc1
11/13/2015, 07:53 AM
so it happens to be a good mix?
Not in the least. Pray that not much chromium came out in the tank. I have a feeling the "benefits" you see are coincidental.

karimwassef
11/13/2015, 01:23 PM
Thanks. That link points to iron being effective for algae. I'm not growing algae. Has anyone seen coral benefits?

dartier
11/13/2015, 01:56 PM
I am with David in that what you are seeing may be coincidental.

However if you want to try to replicate it in a safe manner, you could try adding a trace element product like the Kent one (Essential Elements), or adding an iron supplement like the one linked above. Even though iron dosing is mostly suggested for Macro algae health, I would think that the corals can still benefit by helping the zooxanthellae in iron depleted situations. A common warning is that over dosing iron can cause the coral tissue to darken as the zooxanthellae multiply to much.

The flip side of this is that the Zeovit supplements are often credited with manipulating the metals in the tank to adjust the zooxanthellae density and affect the corals colours. It could be that you did something similar with the nail clippers leaching metals (assuming your observations related to colours and not growth).

Dennis

Spslvr
11/13/2015, 02:36 PM
Thanks. That link points to iron being effective for algae. I'm not growing algae. Has anyone seen coral benefits?

in short...yes, we at the farm have been experimenting with the addition of metals. iron, copper, zinc....[ sps love zinc btw...]. incidently there was an article in advanced aquarist last month about this topic ill see if I can link it. Nickel seems to be depleted faster than all the others and seems to be under level on most triton tests too... but try to source nickel as a chelated compound...


http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2015/10/corals

jason2459
11/13/2015, 02:48 PM
Zinc really? At what levels? To high would be toxic like copper.

Spslvr
11/13/2015, 03:43 PM
Well tbh we dont actually test for zinc as the reagents are pretty exy, we started out dosing by dipping a fingertip into zinc and then adding it to the water, we noticed an almost imediate color shift, atm we add zinc with berocca... Yep plain old original formula berocca1/2 tablet per 250g every 4-5 days...

bertoni
11/13/2015, 03:44 PM
I agree that the change in the tank could be a coincidence, but dosing some chelated iron for a while might be an interesting experiment. I'd be careful about dosing toxic ions. They might affect coloration, but there's going to be some risk there.

karimwassef
11/13/2015, 05:36 PM
What is the natural mechanism on the reefs for import/export?

It may be that there is a natural flux that we don't experience in captivity for these ions?

Does it make sense to add ions but also have an export mechanism like a metal absorbing media to limit overexposure ?

disc1
11/13/2015, 05:41 PM
In nature there is so much water involved that the concentrations can't ever get very high. Think about the deep ocean as a sump with trillions of trillions of times the volume of the reef.

Dan_P
11/13/2015, 05:56 PM
During the period between losing and finding it, I saw a measurable increase in pod activity and coral expansion. Is there a connection? Is the iron turning into rust potentially good for a reef? Or just a coincidence?.

Unless you are keeping very detailed records, any observation of increase in growth or expansion in a population is probably not out of the ordinary variation. At the very most, you can say that for the amount of corroded metal released, it did not adversely effect your aquarium, yet.

karimwassef
11/13/2015, 06:10 PM
There are a lot of variable as play. And it wasn't growth or color change - it was polyp expansion and pod activity/visibility.

I'm curious about other people's experiences with metallic iron or iron additives affecting corals.