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View Full Version : Will newly hatched baby brine suitable for filter feeders?


calk me Q
11/17/2015, 01:48 AM
Before i step into journals, i always heard several sayings that filter feeders eat very fine particles. Until i read one article where compares the polyp feeding under different plankton concentrations. Final result showed that polyp of size from 1mm to 3mm range will increase their feeding intake in line with increase on zooplankton of size from 200um-400um. But showed no big difference when the concentration of plankton of size under 200 increased. And the author assumed bigger sized polyp(say 5mm) will not likely increase feeding intake when the plankton of size under 400um increases except size thereof is approx 500um. So im planning to increase the food concentrations mainly on 200-400um size particles.

So what's the average size for a newly hatched baby brine shrimp? Is it under 200-400um Range?

Any suggestion would help!:headwally:

laga77
11/17/2015, 06:46 AM
New born BBS are less than .04mm, according to Wikipedia.

noy
11/17/2015, 06:58 AM
You should post which articles you are referring to.

BBS is about 450 microns (newly hatched).

I see filter feeders as organisms with a straining mechanism to capture food like sponges or even whale sharks. NPS are primarily polyp capture feeders which i see as something completely different.

200-400 microns is a good plan (not knowing what livestock).

I find its more than the size of the food and that the nature of the food matters. Thats why nobody seems to be able to raise blueberry gorgs.

calk me Q
11/17/2015, 10:26 AM
New born BBS are less than .04mm, according to Wikipedia.

OK ill go for a wiki thx mate

calk me Q
11/17/2015, 10:32 AM
You should post which articles you are referring to.

BBS is about 450 microns (newly hatched).

I see filter feeders as organisms with a straining mechanism to capture food like sponges or even whale sharks. NPS are primarily polyp capture feeders which i see as something completely different.

200-400 microns is a good plan (not knowing what livestock).

I find its more than the size of the food and that the nature of the food matters. Thats why nobody seems to be able to raise blueberry gorgs.
the article im refering to is "James E Palardy Effect of naturally changing zooplankton concentrations on feeding rates of two coral species in the Eastern Pacific"

Yes, im holding the same idea with you. The blueberry is really a mysterious NPS along with Dendronepthya corals both of which i expierenced doom in my tank over time.:sad2:

noy
11/17/2015, 02:31 PM
I just read the study. Its actually a study focused on seeing if there is an increase in feeding over a lunar cycle and the increased zooplankton concentrations. The study used only 2 species Pavona gigantea (LPS - arguably SPS) and Pocillipora damicornis (SPS). The study collected frags from differently locations and set up 4 groups in the substrate (in situ setup): i) fed with an enhanced zoopl concentrations through a 50 micron filter; ii) control with no feeding; iii) 2 groups were exposed to ambient (natural) zoopl levels.

Corals were then dissected/analyzed for feeding levels after 1 hour of feeding.
Data was also collected with a zoopl tow using a 50 micron net and then separated into 1000/400/200/100 and 50 micron filters to see what concentrations of zoopl was near the test environment.

They found a correlation between 200-400 zoopl concentration and feeding rates in the setup for the ambient group(s). Don't think they were able to conclude lunar cycles by themselves had much effect.

I'm not sure how portable this is to NPS corals.

I can tell you in the home aquaria - rotifers, oyster feast and some dry foods are probably your best source for foods in the 200-400 micron range.
I don't put BBS in that range - i can tell you empirically SPS don't feed on BBS. However, that doesn't mean BBS isn't great for NPS tanks (with gorgs and softies) - it is- just not sure this study tells you that.

Not sure if you meant to cite this but the author didn't assume larger polyp corals (5mm) didn't increase food intake when food concentrations under 400micron increases. He cited another study which found Madracis mirabilis (yellow finger coral) (5mm polyps) had less than 10% of zoopl capture which were under 400 microns. Gorgs with larger polyps will readily consume rotifers and oyster feast - both are in the 200micron range.

calk me Q
11/18/2015, 12:31 AM
I just read the study. Its actually a study focused on seeing if there is an increase in feeding over a lunar cycle and the increased zooplankton concentrations. The study used only 2 species Pavona gigantea (LPS - arguably SPS) and Pocillipora damicornis (SPS). The study collected frags from differently locations and set up 4 groups in the substrate (in situ setup): i) fed with an enhanced zoopl concentrations through a 50 micron filter; ii) control with no feeding; iii) 2 groups were exposed to ambient (natural) zoopl levels.

Corals were then dissected/analyzed for feeding levels after 1 hour of feeding.
Data was also collected with a zoopl tow using a 50 micron net and then separated into 1000/400/200/100 and 50 micron filters to see what concentrations of zoopl was near the test environment.

They found a correlation between 200-400 zoopl concentration and feeding rates in the setup for the ambient group(s). Don't think they were able to conclude lunar cycles by themselves had much effect.

I'm not sure how portable this is to NPS corals.

I can tell you in the home aquaria - rotifers, oyster feast and some dry foods are probably your best source for foods in the 200-400 micron range.
I don't put BBS in that range - i can tell you empirically SPS don't feed on BBS. However, that doesn't mean BBS isn't great for NPS tanks (with gorgs and softies) - it is- just not sure this study tells you that.

Not sure if you meant to cite this but the author didn't assume larger polyp corals (5mm) didn't increase food intake when food concentrations under 400micron increases. He cited another study which found Madracis mirabilis (yellow finger coral) (5mm polyps) had less than 10% of zoopl capture which were under 400 microns. Gorgs with larger polyps will readily consume rotifers and oyster feast - both are in the 200micron range.

Thanks Noy. What im thinking is...since we couldnt get a very good result from feeding commercial food(or even cultured rotifers) to keep Dendronepthya and blueberry fan. So im really think if the food size matters as i found those food are below 200um range.
It is quite strange to understand these NPS coral will not get well fed in home aquaria but their siblings that are able to autotrophic(even a bit) can thrive so well in an quarium. Even the flowerpot coral has been conquered in the recent years with the help of more specially designed commercial food coming up.

It seems we cant get two things down for years so far,
1. what they eat
2. How much they eat