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View Full Version : Nikon DSLR D3200 question


Luke Schnabel
01/08/2016, 11:54 AM
I'm having a real hard time getting any Attinic lighting photos to come in on my new camera. My 14,000k lighting are great but everything is super blue and I can't get the right settings for it...

Does anyone have this kind of camera and can take shots that come in during my actinic lighting? Any help would be great!

Misled
01/09/2016, 06:58 PM
Take pics in RAW and adjust the White Balance in post.

noy
01/10/2016, 12:09 PM
I'm having a real hard time getting any Attinic lighting photos to come in on my new camera. My 14,000k lighting are great but everything is super blue and I can't get the right settings for it...

Does anyone have this kind of camera and can take shots that come in during my actinic lighting? Any help would be great!

Post a couple of samples and ppl can make suggestions.

pyithar
01/12/2016, 06:07 AM
Take pics in RAW and adjust the White Balance in post.

+1. that's what i've been doing lately.

Webmanny
01/12/2016, 10:42 AM
I use gel filters. It is faster and simpler. Check out the post below.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=24127806#post24127806

Patwa
01/12/2016, 12:37 PM
I'm having a real hard time getting any Attinic lighting photos to come in on my new camera. My 14,000k lighting are great but everything is super blue and I can't get the right settings for it...

Does anyone have this kind of camera and can take shots that come in during my actinic lighting? Any help would be great!

as others noted, start shooting RAW. Install Adobe Lightroom and from there you can select your appropriate WB

I use gel filters. It is faster and simpler. Check out the post below.

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=24127806#post24127806

This won't work for the OP as he's using an actual camera (Nikon), not a cellphone camera. Gel filters are primary for cellphone cameras, but they're also used in custom flash photography

Webmanny
01/12/2016, 01:39 PM
This won't work for the OP as he's using an actual camera (Nikon), not a cellphone camera. Gel filters are primary for cellphone cameras, but they're also used in custom flash photography


These come is larger size. I have those as well and use them with the same Nikon camera the OP has. It works perfectly and no need to post process.

You use the filter book I linked in my post to find the number that matches your tank lighting and then order the large version of the one that you need for your setup.

http://www.leefilters.com/index.php/camera/filters

Patwa
01/12/2016, 02:12 PM
wow.....you have such an advanced camera but you decided that a 'gel' filter is what you'll go with to get your WB right? whatever floats your boat, I guess.

honestly, that's like buying a pimp BMW 335i and saying, 'yah, the engine is top notch and powerful, but i'd rather my horse pull the car instead'

For those keen on learning how to use their camera.....I highly suggest shooting RAW and post processing after. You'll be able to fix your WB in a snap and a helluva lot more parameters I assure you a gel filter will not be able to fix

Webmanny
01/12/2016, 02:38 PM
Many professionals use filters from movie making to award winning photographers, but your analogy of pulling a BMW with a horse is right on the spot I guess... *smh*

Everyone will use whatever the heck they feel is best for their purpose. If you prefer to shoot raw and spend an hour messing with sliders in Lightroom, go for it, if you want to take a decent macro picture and upload it from your camera using your "eyefi" card to the forum, go with gel filters.

I don't have a dog in the race. I was just trying to give people other options to the "accepted" time consuming method, but whatever dude.

Have a great day!

Patwa
01/12/2016, 03:56 PM
Many professionals use filters from movie making to award winning photographers...

indeed, professionals and wannabe-professionals like me do use filters ...but they're very likely to not be using cheap and simple colour-correcting gel filters on their high-end SLRs. More along the lines of highly engineered circular polarizers, UV/haze or NDs from vendors like Tiffen, B&W, Hoya, etc.


If you prefer to shoot raw and spend an hour messing with sliders in Lightroom, go for it, if you want to take a decent macro picture and upload it from your camera using your "eyefi" card to the forum, go with gel filters.

I don't have a dog in the race. I was just trying to give people other options to the "accepted" time consuming method, but whatever dude.

Have a great day!

I don't think you understand how simple it is to shoot RAW and adjust afterwards in LR.....it takes 20 seconds. But if you value 'time to process and post online' more than 'photographic quality', then you win with the gel filters....can't argue with that! to each his own :)

have a good one too!

rickztahone
01/13/2016, 07:52 PM
RAW+PP= WB correction. Of course you can try to get the color correct from the get go. If your camera has a custom WB memory slot, you can get a white or grey piece of paper and have the light source hit that piece of paper. Custom set it to match that light source and it should be accurate in post. However, keep in mind that with aquarium photography this is hit and miss. In almost every other kind of photography, this is the norm.