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Dogshowgrl
03/21/2016, 08:13 PM
In your tank:
What species do you have?
Size of your tank?
What temp do YOU shoot for?
What range do you stay in?
When do you freak out?
And how are you reaching the goal? Fans, chillers, room temp?

Jeff4777
03/21/2016, 08:24 PM
In your tank:
What species do you have?
Size of your tank?
What temp do YOU shoot for?
What range do you stay in?
When do you freak out?
And how are you reaching the goal? Fans, chillers, room temp?

4 CB ORA H. Erectus. (2 female, 2 male).
55 gallon, 4 foot long.
68-75
stays steady around 72-73.
I freak out if it goes over 75. Only happened once and nothing bad happened.
Its directly under a AC vent, has a tall standing fan next to the tank, ceiling fan is usually left on high, and that's all I need to manage the temperature personally.

pfan151
03/21/2016, 09:48 PM
Erectus pair. 30 gal tall. I have my chiller set at 72 and the temp goes from 71 to 73.

vlangel
03/22/2016, 04:51 AM
Ocean Rider CB erectus pair
36g bowfront 22" tall
Chiller is usually set at 70 and stays in 70-72F. Coralife chiller has a thermostat built in. I will lower the temperature to 68-70 after treating a bacterial infection.

Roccus
03/25/2016, 05:32 AM
H erectus pair ( plus a pair of blue banded pipe fish) in a 29 biocube... chiller set at 72 with + or - 1 degree

I don't freak out..I think out any problem and react accordingly in a precise controlled manner.. I try to remain pro active rather than reactive.

DanU
03/28/2016, 05:38 AM
Multiple seahorse species in different tanks
Tanks vary from 29 to 150 gallons, total of almost 3,000 gal
Tropical species - Winter - 69 - 74, Early spring and late fall - 72 - 74, Summer months 75 Temperate species - 66
Tropical species - Actual temps run between 68 - 77 Temperate species - 66
Tropical species - When temps get above 75 we are watching closely to make sure they don't exceed 77 Temperate species - when temps reach 68
Tropical species - Ambient room temperature (AC units) combined with a dedicate fan blowing on each system. Temperate species with chillers.

Dan

rocksaus
03/29/2016, 12:55 PM
Can anyone explain why they choose these temps? Everything I've read about tropical seahorses lists an ideal temperature of up to 78 like a normal tank. But I see a lot of people won't run it above 75. Why is this?

rayjay
03/29/2016, 02:13 PM
Perhaps others do it for the same reason that I do.
Many years ago I found that my seahorses were continually being exposed to bacterial infections causing me to loose some of them and a lot of expense to treat the ones that did survive.
One of the seahorse forums (no longer running) that I frequented at that time mentioned about the correlation between bacterial growth and temperature.
As it seemed to make sense to me, I dropped my temperatures and over the next few years I increased my husbandry practices as well.
Today, I think many are of the opinion that indeed the lower temperatures do lessen the risk of bacterial infections, but I ALSO believe it important to maintain a high level quality water in the tanks, better even that I've ever been concerned about for all my reef tanks.
I now have a much better success situation, although you can do everything recommended and at times, still end up with problems.

DanU
03/29/2016, 03:22 PM
Pretty much agree with Ray. The short answer is there is a much higher chance of long term success with lower temperatures.

We all know seahorses are different than other fish is many ways. One of those that many folks don't take into account is that their immune system is different as well, much more primitive. Seahorses apparently lack GALT (gut associated lymphoid tissue) which helps with adaptive immunity. The other thing is some species of vibrio grow exponentially faster each degree above 75 F. Combine these two things with the traditional seahorse setup that is small tank because they don't move around as much, not enough filtration and low flow with temps above 77, you would be lucky to have the seahorses beyond 18 months, typically I see issues less than 12 months with this type of setup.

There are many seahorse enthusiasts that have had the same seahorses for several years, some reaching 7, 8, & 9 years. Personally, I have some live beyond 10 years. Almost all run temperatures in the lower to mid 70's.

In 13 years of breeding seahorses, dealing with customers, participating in various forums, I can only recall 3 who have had long term success with temps at 78 and higher. They had larger tanks, light stocking densities, much higher than average flow, really good filtration and fed live foods.

Dan

rocksaus
03/29/2016, 04:18 PM
Wow, perfect answers. Thank you very much