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jwilliams860
04/11/2016, 11:23 AM
Setting up the renew, od the runoff ports of each metered can have to go back to their origination points?

i.e. The pump from the sump when it fills the metering can, the extra little bit that runs back in to the sump, will it make much difference if I just route this to my waste bin as well, and the same for the run off from the new water can?

My setup is in the garage and I'm just trying to limit how much tubing I need to run through the wall.

Thanks

GenesisReefSys
04/11/2016, 03:04 PM
Hi jwilliams,

Your proposed setup will work just fine if you're okay with discarding a small amount (maybe a cup or so maximum?) of "new" water with each 1 gallon exchange. Don't worry - the amount removed from the sump will be exactly one gallon, and it will be replaced with exactly one gallon as well with your proposed setup. Indeed, this will reduce the amount of tubing you will need to run from your mixing bin to your sump.

Please let me know if you have any other questions! By the way, we can generally respond faster if you email us directly through our website, but you're welcome to continue using the forum too.

Best regards,
Kevin

jwilliams860
04/11/2016, 04:48 PM
Thanks for the reply, I can actually route the "new" water runoff back to the container pretty easily, the one back to the sump was the main issue, and its easier for me to send it back to the outside sink much easier.

I'll email directly as well.

ArmanS
04/11/2016, 10:35 PM
Kevin,

Question for you about this.

On the pump that is in the sump pumping out the old water, 1 hose goes to the drain, 1 hose connected to the pump to fill the metering bin and 1 hose goes back into the sump to return any water that is more then the 1 gallon required.

If you ran the 1 hose that goes back to the sump that is supposed to return any extra water to your drain rather then your sump, wouldn't your salinity change over time since you would be sending out the 1 gallon in the metering bin + the cup or so that was supposed to return back to the sump during every 1 gallon interval?

Thanks,
Arman

GenesisReefSys
04/12/2016, 06:06 AM
Good morning!

I apologize, I misread the original post. ArmanS is right - if the "extra" water being pumped out of the sump is discarded, over time your salinity will drop slightly because your top off will replace the removed salt water with fresh water.

That actually brings up a good point, though. Keep in mind that over time you're likely to see a slight downward salinity drift with any top off system, because whenever water is removed from the aquarium system and not immediately replaced, a top off device believes it has evaporated and will add fresh water to bring the water level back up to the normal running level. For instance, any time water is moved from the sump into the skimmate cup of a protein skimmer, that water is removed from the aquarium system - and a top off device replaces it with fresh water. Likewise when acclimating new corals, fish, or inverts - as the water is moved to the acclimation container, it is removed from the aquarium system. For this reason, I personally adjust the salinity of my replacement water to be just very slightly higher than my display tank's salinity. Keep in mind, the larger the aquarium system, the less the downward drift due to skimmate and acclimation - so don't adjust your replacement water's salinity too greatly, just a very slight amount.

Best regards,
Kevin

ArmanS
04/12/2016, 10:38 AM
Kevin,

Thanks for the prompt response. That makes more sense!

I am wondering, the pump that sends the water to the metering bin, it shuts off once the metering bin reaches the 1 gallon level, and then the extra water is ran back down into the sump. On that line that is running the "extra" water back down, couldn't we use a barbed T fitting and connect it back to the hose that fills the metering bin? This way we have only 1 hose that exits and enters the sump rather then two? The water would simply come back through the pump and return to the sump similar to when you turn your return pump off?

Would this work for the OP?

GenesisReefSys
04/13/2016, 04:06 PM
Good afternoon ArmanS,

While this might technically work, it is extremely risky. This almost guarantees an overflow of the Metering Reservoir unless the flow rate is just right, because there's no way for "excess" water to flow out of the Metering Reservoir while the pump is running (well, except for out the top... bad news!). After the pump turns off, yes - the water will drain through the tube, but while the pump is on, water will be flowing into the Metering Reservoir through both tubes if they're tee'd together.

Plus, the loopback tube acts as a vent to ensure that air can enter the Metering Reservoir to displace the water is it drains. If both tubes are connected with a tee, there is no longer a vent to allow air unrestricted entry into the Metering Reservoir.

Make sense?

Thanks for the question!
Kevin

jwilliams860
04/13/2016, 09:12 PM
Good morning!

I apologize, I misread the original post. ArmanS is right - if the "extra" water being pumped out of the sump is discarded, over time your salinity will drop slightly because your top off will replace the removed salt water with fresh water.

That actually brings up a good point, though. Keep in mind that over time you're likely to see a slight downward salinity drift with any top off system, because whenever water is removed from the aquarium system and not immediately replaced, a top off device believes it has evaporated and will add fresh water to bring the water level back up to the normal running level. For instance, any time water is moved from the sump into the skimmate cup of a protein skimmer, that water is removed from the aquarium system - and a top off device replaces it with fresh water. Likewise when acclimating new corals, fish, or inverts - as the water is moved to the acclimation container, it is removed from the aquarium system. For this reason, I personally adjust the salinity of my replacement water to be just very slightly higher than my display tank's salinity. Keep in mind, the larger the aquarium system, the less the downward drift due to skimmate and acclimation - so don't adjust your replacement water's salinity too greatly, just a very slight amount.

Best regards,
Kevin


I'm OK with the little extra not going back into the tank. I've got enough water volume I don't think it will impact it that much and I stay on top of the salinity also by adjusting my new water vs the display. Thanks for the response