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View Full Version : Marine Equivalent of guppies?


Alexraptor
06/10/2016, 07:45 AM
I mean not literally a saltwater guppy, but I was wondering if there are any marine fish in the trade that sort of breed like guppies in the sense that no special care or supervision is required?

Most of the marine fish I have read about tend to require removing the eggs or fry and putting them in a safe environment and feeding them with special foods.
Whereas my experience with guppies in freshwater tanks is there will be a crapload of them eventually even if you do nothing beyond the daily routine and just make sure they have shelter.

Taahirs
06/10/2016, 07:53 AM
Nope

shifty51008
06/10/2016, 03:35 PM
mollies, they breed like crazy in SW

ThRoewer
06/10/2016, 08:21 PM
mollies, they breed like crazy in SW

Yep, but they are not really what understand as a marine fish :lmao:

Banggai cardinals have pretty well developed babies that don't need a larvae tank, but breeding them successfully is still quite a task.

shifty51008
06/10/2016, 08:27 PM
Yep, but they are not really what understand as a marine fish :lmao:

Banggai cardinals have pretty well developed babies that don't need a larvae tank, but breeding them successfully is still quite a task.

very true, I just thought he wanted a fish that could live in SW and breed real easy even though mollies are brackish.

ThRoewer
06/10/2016, 09:38 PM
Actually, in the right tank, with enough macro algae and a healthy pod population, some Seahorses can reproduce without human intervention.

Alexraptor
06/12/2016, 08:33 AM
Seahorses crossed my mind, but IIRC they pretty much "require" chillers to maintain good health.

ThRoewer
06/12/2016, 02:06 PM
Seahorses crossed my mind, but IIRC they pretty much "require" chillers to maintain good health.

Even tropical species? They are not deep water fish but most commonly found in seagrass fields between the reef and the shore. Tropical species should be able to handle higher temperatures.

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Alexraptor
06/12/2016, 07:30 PM
It is my understanding it is not directly the temperature, but that seahorses are prone to contracting bacterial infections, bacteria which thrive in warm waters, which is why it's been generally recommended to keep temperatures on the lower end of the tropical temperature range.

johno4
06/13/2016, 09:34 AM
mollies, they breed like crazy in SW

I know feeding fresh water fish to marine is not healthy for them. Does anything change in terms of nutritional value when using brackish fish (mollies) raised in a marine environment? I cant find much info on the web on this.

ThRoewer
06/13/2016, 11:26 AM
The danger of feeding fw fish to marine fish is not in nutritional deficiencies, but rather in the risk of transmitting certain internal diseases like fish tuberculosis and Ichthyosporidium hoferi to name the worst of them.

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johno4
06/13/2016, 12:12 PM
The danger of feeding fw fish to marine fish is not in nutritional deficiencies, but rather in the risk of transmitting certain internal diseases like fish tuberculosis and Ichthyosporidium hoferi to name the worst of them.

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I always thought it was due to the higher fat content in the freshwater fish.

BlueCat1949
06/13/2016, 07:26 PM
Actually, in the right tank, with enough macro algae and a healthy pod population, some Seahorses can reproduce without human intervention.

If this were true there would be a lot more seahorses on the market with very cheap prices but alas even with special care most people fail at raising seahorse fry. Getting them to breed and getting fry are easy, raising fry is not.

Protoavis
06/14/2016, 01:29 AM
It is my understanding it is not directly the temperature, but that seahorses are prone to contracting bacterial infections, bacteria which thrive in warm waters, which is why it's been generally recommended to keep temperatures on the lower end of the tropical temperature range.

Correct, it's not the temp it's the vibrio bacterias that double very rapidly above 24c (74f-ish) that they are can't handle with their weak immune systems.

Also agree with BlueCat1949, getting fry is easy and requires no real effort beyond having male and female adults (and you'll often get fry most months once they start breeding) raising the fry though is a whole different can of worms and most people fail to get even 1% to 6months.