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Fourstars
07/11/2016, 06:00 PM
At first I thought it was a sponge, but upon inspection, it is part of the colony. I already have enough of these green polyps and wonder if I should remove this? Pretty cool see pic.

354173

titustitus
07/11/2016, 06:31 PM
Spawn?

Reef Bass
07/12/2016, 06:08 AM
I highly doubt that is a part of the polyps. I'd get rid of it and possibly the clump of polyps it's attached to if you already have a bunch of those.

It looks like there might be some aiptasia at 6 and 9 o'clock. I suggest getting rid of those as well.

Fourstars
07/12/2016, 06:58 AM
I highly doubt that is a part of the polyps. I'd get rid of it and possibly the clump of polyps it's attached to if you already have a bunch of those.

It looks like there might be some aiptasia at 6 and 9 o'clock. I suggest getting rid of those as well.

Thanks, I might wait and watch for now. I went in with aiptasiaX and now have twice as many. I purchased a file fish last week so we'll see if he helps me out. Cool fish! I don't think he has much interest in the larger ones so I'll go hunting again.

SeaCucumberFan
07/12/2016, 08:05 AM
Get a berghia nudibranch

Reef Bass
07/12/2016, 06:23 PM
File fish are interesting in their unique way.

Berghia are excellent predators of aiptasia, that's all they eat, but one isn't going to cut it by a long shot. One needs to establish a breeding population of them, which can take a couple months, so patience is key.

Twice I have used berghia to irradicate whole tank infestations of aiptasia. Two or three more times I have tried to get the breeding population going and failed. Starting with many adults was the key for me. Last time I introduced more than 30 in my 100g. The times I failed I only added 6-8.

titustitus
07/12/2016, 06:29 PM
Take the rock out, use a syringe with hot water to kill the aipt. Then rinse the area using tap water from the syringe.

Fourstars
07/14/2016, 11:36 AM
File fish are interesting in their unique way.

Berghia are excellent predators of aiptasia, that's all they eat, but one isn't going to cut it by a long shot. One needs to establish a breeding population of them, which can take a couple months, so patience is key.

Twice I have used berghia to irradicate whole tank infestations of aiptasia. Two or three more times I have tried to get the breeding population going and failed. Starting with many adults was the key for me. Last time I introduced more than 30 in my 100g. The times I failed I only added 6-8.

I looked into these nudibranchs but the price is pretty steep for the size tank. and I heard the don't last very long. How would you keep them breeding unless you also breed aiptasia? and would I have a mass die off?

reefwars
07/14/2016, 06:43 PM
I looked into these nudibranchs but the price is pretty steep for the size tank. and I heard the don't last very long. How would you keep them breeding unless you also breed aiptasia? and would I have a mass die off?

Buy a few adults and keep them in a mason jar and feed them smaller aiptasia and once you have a decent supply of eggs and new hatches you can start to release them to the display , put them in at night is best when fish are sleeping and hiding , they don't last long cause they eat up their supply of food pretty quick and then starve out and die , a lot of times people fail cause they just dump in a few adults and hope for the best but if you breed them for a short period they work wonders , have used them many times over the years :)

If cost is an issue years ago several of us use to buy one each and have one person breed them like I mentioned above then split the pop later :)

After aiptasia is gone sell them to other hobbyist to recoup the initial cost :)

Hth

Jah2707
07/19/2016, 08:34 AM
I have had many zoanthids with sponges connected to them. That is what it looks like to me. In the past I have had yellow sponges take over an entire colony. It took about a year, so I would cut or rip it away if I was you.

Fourstars
07/19/2016, 10:56 AM
I have had many zoanthids with sponges connected to them. That is what it looks like to me. In the past I have had yellow sponges take over an entire colony. It took about a year, so I would cut or rip it away if I was you.

Thanks, already done.

Fourstars
07/19/2016, 11:42 AM
Buy a few adults and keep them in a mason jar and feed them smaller aiptasia and once you have a decent supply of eggs and new hatches you can start to release them to the display , put them in at night is best when fish are sleeping and hiding , they don't last long cause they eat up their supply of food pretty quick and then starve out and die , a lot of times people fail cause they just dump in a few adults and hope for the best but if you breed them for a short period they work wonders , have used them many times over the years :)

If cost is an issue years ago several of us use to buy one each and have one person breed them like I mentioned above then split the pop later :)

After aiptasia is gone sell them to other hobbyist to recoup the initial cost :)

Hth

If they get out of control I'll give this a try. Thanks for the information!