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View Full Version : How strong does this stand look?


ZenGuitarGuy
08/31/2016, 09:44 PM
Hey all, not sure if this is the right area for this post, but here goes...
I bought and tank and stand from a friend. 65G. For some reason, I feel like the stand isn't strong enough to hold the weight. The fact that the friend had the tank on the stand for nearly 10 years hasn't removed my doubts about it. I just looks like it was build wrong to me, but I'm no expert. I'm looking for opinions about it...thanks!

http://imgur.com/a/XQqLO

Ron Reefman
09/01/2016, 03:13 AM
I've built my share of stands, and that's not the design that I would use. However, it looks pretty stout to me. I like that the area under the DT doesn't have any vertical support that get in the way of working in the sump. However, it does look like it could wrack (fold up sideways) and I'd add a brace from the top corner at one end to the bottom corner at the other end in the back. Maybe even go both ways and form an 'X' in the back that could be tied together at the crossing point of the 'X'.

BTW, my dad was born and raised in Stratford, Ont. only about 30 miles from you, eh.

uncleof6
09/01/2016, 04:31 AM
Photos can be decpetive, however, without better photos:

The tank sits on the one bys, which are attached to the only vertical support (the outer framing at either end) in shear. As such, I would not even sit on the stand let alone put a tank full of water on it. If what I am seeing is correct, it is absolutely without a doubt UNSAFE... Aquariums require direct vertical support from the bottom of the tank to the floor. At a minimum, depending on length of the tank, this vertical support needs to be at the four corners. It should not be in shear as is the case with this stand design.

The direct no nonsense, non palliative answer to your question is: The stand is not designed correctly, and quite honestly I am surprised the tank did not hit the floor. Sump access is irrelevent, as safety comes first. The "fact" that it lasted 10 years so far could be a testement to the strength of wood; but, it also means it has been under load for 10 years. Is it usable? Yes, but you really need to put in some vertical support at both ends of the front and rear, and under both ends. Though many times factory stands are put together pretty sloppy, but one thing they have in common is that direct vertical support from the tank to the floor. Was the stand modified? Quite possibly.

ZenGuitarGuy
09/01/2016, 07:01 AM
BTW, my dad was born and raised in Stratford, Ont. only about 30 miles from you, eh.

That is a nice town to grown up in. My girlfriend spent time there as well.

THE ROOK
09/01/2016, 07:40 AM
Photos can be decpetive, however, without better photos:

The tank sits on the one bys, which are attached to the only vertical support (the outer framing at either end) in shear. As such, I would not even sit on the stand let alone put a tank full of water on it. If what I am seeing is correct, it is absolutely without a doubt UNSAFE... Aquariums require direct vertical support from the bottom of the tank to the floor. At a minimum, depending on length of the tank, this vertical support needs to be at the four corners. It should not be in shear as is the case with this stand design.

The direct no nonsense, non palliative answer to your question is: The stand is not designed correctly, and quite honestly I am surprised the tank did not hit the floor. Sump access is irrelevent, as safety comes first. The "fact" that it lasted 10 years so far could be a testement to the strength of wood; but, it also means it has been under load for 10 years. Is it usable? Yes, but you really need to put in some vertical support at both ends of the front and rear, and under both ends. Though many times factory stands are put together pretty sloppy, but one thing they have in common is that direct vertical support from the tank to the floor. Was the stand modified? Quite possibly.
Ya, I'd agree. At the minimum, you'd want to add some vertical members to support the horizontals at the corners. Then possibly some rear 45 degree bracing if there's any possibility of the stand "racking". Or build yourself a decent one from scratch.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

asdfghp
09/01/2016, 02:27 PM
Shear mode is bad :sad2:
Compressive mode is good :bdaysmile:

ZenGuitarGuy
09/01/2016, 04:31 PM
Shear mode is bad :sad2:
Compressive mode is good :bdaysmile:

What is compressive mode please?

Greybeard
09/01/2016, 04:55 PM
Top board sitting ON TOP of support = compressive load.
Top board attached to SIDE OF support = shear load.

If it's engineered right, there's nothing _wrong_ with a shear load, as long as the joints are designed to withstand the load. I just built 8 stands that each hold 2x 30g tanks for a local aquarium shop. They're all designed with shear load. Each 30g tank weighs about 350lbs. Load is spread over 4 joints. Joints are designed to withstand 800 lbs shear load each. It's safe.

All said, that stand doesn't look particularly resilient to me. If you don't trust it, then don't trust it. It's not that difficult, or expensive, to build one that you do trust.

ZenGuitarGuy
09/01/2016, 05:23 PM
Thank you all for the advice here. I'm going to go with it, and my gut, and find a way to reinforce this one, or DIY a new one.

Ron Reefman
09/02/2016, 06:13 AM
Do a search for Rocket Engineer (I think) who has an image of a good build design. I did an 11'x3'x42" stand utilizing his design that had a 180g and a 75g tank sitting on it (2000+ pounds).

http://i395.photobucket.com/albums/pp37/RonReefman/P6060062_zpsbcfcac6d.jpg (http://s395.photobucket.com/user/RonReefman/media/P6060062_zpsbcfcac6d.jpg.html)


As for Uncleof6's opinions about your stand... the fact that it was in use for nearly 10 years and didn't fail tells you how to approach his "I would not even sit on the stand let alone put a tank full of water on it." comment. I'm sure he'll comeback at me for that...

As for Stratford, I attended family reunions there for many years as a kid (my Dad had moved to Detroit). And as a young adult my girlfriend and I would go one long weekend every summer and see a couple of plays. The place holds lots of wonderful memories for me.

Good luck with the stand.

Jason777
09/02/2016, 02:27 PM
There are plenty of videos showing a better way to build a stand with vertical supports holding the weight. A few 2X4's or 2X6's will make for cheap peace of mind.