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DeepSeaReefer94
10/16/2016, 08:08 PM
I was wondering if anyone has ever added dry Rock to an already established tank? I'm planning on setting up a nano tank and would like to already have established Rock when it gets setup. Any pros or cons to doing this?

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2smokes
10/16/2016, 08:34 PM
At first it will get covered in cyano fast.Cyano will cover the rock because new dry rock leaches po4.That happens until the fosfates are ,,cemented,, by magnesium and calcium from the water.It doesnt matter if the dry rock is baked or washed in acid.

tosh48
10/17/2016, 05:48 AM
You want to add dry rock to an established tank or adding old rock to a new tank?

muttley000
10/19/2016, 07:51 PM
I was wondering if anyone has ever added dry Rock to an already established tank? I'm planning on setting up a nano tank and would like to already have established Rock when it gets setup. Any pros or cons to doing this?

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I did it a year ago, still trying to get my system back in shape. Cure it first!

DeepSeaReefer94
10/19/2016, 07:53 PM
I did it a year ago, still trying to get my system back in shape. Cure it first!
I would definitely cure it first just wondering if it was a good idea? Thanks

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sculpin2
10/19/2016, 08:12 PM
If it's dry reef rock, it'll be full of dried out boring sponges and clams which will rot in your tank, immediately dumping phosphate and nitrogen into your system. If it's Florida "mined" rock, it's sat underground for millennia absorbing who knows what. I have Florida mined rock where coralline still won't grow on it after years in a tank otherwise completely awash in coralline.

Personally, I bought Fiji dry rock, soaked it in vinegar for a day to soften the surface layers, scrubbed off what I could of the biologics, soaked it in bicarb for a week to neutralize the acid, scrubbed it again and picked as much dead life out of the holes with tweezers as possible. Then I kept soaking it in a weak bicarb solution with a powerhead for flow, changing the water weekly, for about a month until the stench decreased to minimal.

The real issue with the reef rock is the retained biologic materials. All of the dried protein and DNA in the dead organisms immediately become ammonia/nitrite/nitrate and phosphate upon rehydration.

DeepSeaReefer94
10/26/2016, 08:12 AM
You want to add dry rock to an established tank or adding old rock to a new tank?
Want to add dry rock (would cure before adding to established system) to my established tank for a few months then move that rock to a new aquarium with WC water from my established system. For a few reasons
1. No pests that I don't already know how to deal with.
2. I'll have time to set everything up the way I want.
3. It will already be seeded when I add it to the new tank.
4. I think I'll be able to add most of my fish to the new tank all at once (it will already have the necessary bacteria to handle all the fish and won't have to build up to the amount of fish over time).

tell me if I'm thinking wrong here.

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epstein
11/16/2016, 02:45 PM
how much rock do you have that is already cured? how old its it and how old is teh tank. How much rock do you want to add?

Reefer40b
11/25/2016, 09:17 PM
Maybe Im just lucky but I have added dry rock to my tank and never had any issues. i get a new coral stick it on the rock and put the rock in the tank.

Aslmx
11/26/2016, 08:25 AM
Maybe Im just lucky but I have added dry rock to my tank and never had any issues. i get a new coral stick it on the rock and put the rock in the tank.

Me too, I've added dry rock before with no problems. I wouldn't add 100lbs at a time but I've added a piece or two to my tank just to change the scape.

DamonG
11/26/2016, 09:24 AM
I agree with the last two posters.. And my experience has been the same.. I have done it, but only added small amounts at one time, to offset any potential nutrient increase that may and will occur.. I also tend to place the newer rock below established rock so the light will not hit it, mitigating algea growth in uncoated surfaces..

From note 5.. rip note 7

Zatoichi
12/22/2016, 12:46 AM
I used to add my rock to the area of the sump that the Overflow entered in a dark spot that way you don't get nuisance algae and other fun stuff growing on it before it becomes biologically active again

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GoVols
12/23/2016, 01:08 AM
Always heard to acid wash it.

If not elements will be leaching and is quickly over grown with hair algae.

RynoParsons
12/23/2016, 02:59 AM
I added one dry rock to my tank. caused a massive cayno problem for 2months

Elricsfate
12/23/2016, 06:38 AM
It would be helpful when talking about the effects of adding dry rock, if people would mention what rock they used.

Reef Saver is not the same a Pukani...as an example. One from the ocean with organisms stuck in the crevices, one from land with no organisms. Walt Smith...man made, no organisms. That would make a big difference.

ca1ore
12/23/2016, 09:04 PM
Agreed, dry rock comes in all shapes and sizes, so really no way to predict the result. I will say that adding a small amount to a good sized system is less likely to be problematic. When I moved from my prior 90 to current 265, I used about 30 pounds of dry rock as the base under the sand on which my established rock was then placed. Had no issues.

CindyK
01/08/2017, 11:09 AM
I've added dry rock to my newly established system after soaking it in RODI for a couple of weeks with just a little diatom bloom to show for it. The rock was from Florida somewhere.

jeffdenney
01/08/2017, 01:02 PM
I removed my skimmer and filled that sump compartment with previously used dry rock. It was from and unknown tank, and I barely rinsed it with fresh water and a fresh bristle brush.

4 months later. no ill effects to speak of. I never noticed a phosphate spike or nitrates or anything.

My tank is 2 years mature with lots of live rock in the display so maybe it just cycled through with out me noticing. I test all params once a week, alk everyday almost.

Lavoisier
01/08/2017, 04:26 PM
I did it a year ago, still trying to get my system back in shape. Cure it first!

Yes, must agree.

Spudsly
01/08/2017, 08:51 PM
I've done this several times and just always go very slow. Doesn't help if you want to add one big piece but if you can get away with slowly adding it, I think it's a safer way to go.

devastator007
01/13/2017, 09:59 AM
What i did when I added new dry rock is soak it in RO waste water in a bucket with a powerhead. I'd periodically do a 100% change on the water while running my RODI and just use the waste water to fill the bucket as to not waste the water. Di this every 3-5 days for about 2 months. I'd also check the bucket water before emptying for ammonia, nitrates, and phosphates. Once I read 0s for everything, I called it good and added to my tank. I haven't had any issues with the rock and has been in my tank for about a month so far. It's not "cured" as in good bacteria usable in saltwater, but there's nothing leaching from it at this point. If you really wanted, you could use saltwater and seed it with some bacteria, but if you already have an established tank i don't see the point.

rocsec1
01/24/2017, 08:15 PM
I have added reef cleaners rock with no problem

guarda
01/24/2017, 08:35 PM
Mirroring the above. My tank is about 10 years old and I've added dry rock (never more than 1/5 total rock volume at a time) and never had an issue.

Oeste
01/26/2017, 11:43 AM
I purchased 30lbs of pukani and brs dryrock for my new 29gl and sump.
The pukani had loads of crusty stuff and the brs had some green spots. I read up on Muriatic Baths and went that route (water first, then pour acid in). Two 5gl buckets later I used two .99 cent boxes of baking soda per bucket. Rinsed in DI water twice and let the rock air dry for 48hrs.

Never had anything grow on the rock.

BE VERY CAUTIOUS WHEN USING MURIATIC ACID. Read, read, youtube, read read prior

mickey204
01/27/2017, 09:06 AM
Mirroring the above. My tank is about 10 years old and I've added dry rock (never more than 1/5 total rock volume at a time) and never had an issue.

Same deal here, I've always added dry rock to systems with no issues.

If your system is running well and established, adding dry rock to it shouldn't be an issue. The biological filtration should easily handle any "rot" or die off that was on the dry rock, if there is any.

Just to be safe, you can always put some RO water in a bucket and rinse/wash the rock (use a toothbrush or larger dish brush) to get any old sediment or loose particles off it prior to putting in.

Now if you don't have enough biological filtration and dump in a wackload, you could run into a problem.