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View Full Version : Do you use cyanoacrylate to cover the fraging site


Tripod1404
11/03/2016, 11:15 AM
Hello Guys,

I am relatively new to fraging and I have a question about the process. After you frag and LPS coral, do you use cyanoacrylate to cover the open wound left on both the mother colony and the new frag?
I know the fraging site is mostly just the dead skeleton but close to the polyps there is some live tissue that you cut through while fraging. Should I make a cyanoacrylate patch around that tissue or would it heal in its own without getting infected.

jeromeit
11/03/2016, 01:40 PM
great question, I was wondering this myself.

vhuang168
11/03/2016, 02:01 PM
Good video to watch

https://youtu.be/3_4pn78ZFX0



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JonezNReef
11/04/2016, 12:17 PM
Good video to watch

https://youtu.be/3_4pn78ZFX0



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After watching that now I want to got chop some stuff up

organism
11/14/2016, 12:06 PM
No, never put superglue on corals unless you don't want to have those corals anymore. Superglue goes between the frag plug and whatever rock you're gluing on it.

vhuang168
11/14/2016, 01:02 PM
No, never put superglue on corals unless you don't want to have those corals anymore. Superglue goes between the frag plug and whatever rock you're gluing on it.



ROFLOL! I guess all the corals glued on my rock should be dead instead of encrusting over the glue and onto the rock.

But let me ask you what is holding the coral onto the frag plug.


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organism
11/14/2016, 01:09 PM
ROFLOL! I guess all the corals glued on my rock should be dead instead of encrusting over the glue and onto the rock.

But let me ask you what is holding the coral onto the frag plug.

So you glued coral flesh to frag plugs instead of the rock / skeleton? In that case I'm surprised they survived, because I said whatever rock you're gluing on the frag plug. Not what rock you're gluing the frag plug onto.

Next time maybe read first before ironically trolling people.

vhuang168
11/14/2016, 01:18 PM
You said "Superglue goes between the frag plug and whatever rock your're gluing on it". That plus the sentence before implies you don't use superglue to mount corals at all.

Or you mount coral that are encrusted on rocks on frag plugs. Either way, doesn't matter. It's the 1st sentence that is incorrect.

When you use super glue to mount coral on frag plugs do you scrap the flesh off so you don't glue the flesh?

EVERYONE glues frags onto frag plugs with superglue. Flesh and all.

Before you berate others maybe do a little research and make sure you give correct information?


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organism
11/14/2016, 05:25 PM
You said "Superglue goes between the frag plug and whatever rock gluing on it". That plus the sentence before implies you don't use superglue to mount corals at all.

Or you mount coral that are encrusted on rocks on frag plugs. Either way, doesn't matter. It's the 1st sentence that is incorrect.

Wow, some top notch cognitive dissonance right there... Best of luck with that particularly fine vintage of cognitive dissonance and allergy to responsibility, it's truly sad when people feel they have to pretend strangers on the internet are dumb to feel better about themselves.

organism
11/14/2016, 05:32 PM
OP in case vhu's trolling has made things confusing here's the info again: superglue only needs to touch rock or skeleton, you don't want it to touch flesh. Leave the original colony to heal without putting anything on it (but put it in moderate flow until it heals to avoid infections), and glue down the frag's skeleton or rock to the frag plug. Hope this helps :)

vhuang168
11/14/2016, 08:18 PM
Wow, some top notch cognitive dissonance right there... Best of luck with that particularly fine vintage of cognitive dissonance and allergy to responsibility, it's truly sad when people feel they have to pretend strangers on the internet are dumb to feel better about themselves.

Ok, I'll bite.

Feel free to show me where there is any dissonance in my beliefs. BTW, what you put in bold is what YOU posted. Not me. I just quoted you.

As far as allergy to responsibility, I am always responsible for my postings. Show me where I am not. Have I denied anything I've posted so far?

It always seem to be this way. Someone gets challenged then resorts to name calling or insulting the person that made the assertions trying to divert attention to the matter at hand.

I challenge you to find somewhere that says it is not ok to put superglue (CA) on the flesh when gluing down frags on plugs or rock. (This applies to SPS - there seems to be confusion since you said corals and I take that to mean SPS but the OP's question was about LPS.)

Even if you put CA over the cut wounds on LPS frags, it wouldn't harm it. Might make it heal into a funny shape since the CA will harden and the coral will have to grow around it. Or it could just slough it off when it slimes.

Just a fun fact, CA or superglue is sometimes used to seal human wounds.

pisanoal
11/15/2016, 07:17 AM
I wouldn't cover the dragged area on the mother colony. It will heal. I usually glue the cut part of the frag down as it usually makes the most sense to do so shape wise.

pisanoal
11/15/2016, 07:20 AM
OP in case vhu's trolling has made things confusing here's the info again: superglue only needs to touch rock or skeleton, you don't want it to touch flesh. Leave the original colony to heal without putting anything on it (but put it in moderate flow until it heals to avoid infections), and glue down the frag's skeleton or rock to the frag plug. Hope this helps :)

And while you don't want gobs of super glue all over the coral, some superglue touching the flesh at the base of the coral skeleton will not kill the whole coral. This is how I glue every single frag I make.

jayball
11/15/2016, 01:46 PM
superglue only needs to touch rock or skeleton, you don't want it to touch flesh. Leave the original colony to heal without putting anything on it (but put it in moderate flow until it heals to avoid infections), and glue down the frag's skeleton or rock to the frag plug. Hope this helps :)

Ignoring the argument I will just say I agree with this statement. It is best to keep the recently cut flesh in the flow to help it heal.

johno4
11/17/2016, 01:23 PM
And while you don't want gobs of super glue all over the coral, some superglue touching the flesh at the base of the coral skeleton will not kill the whole coral. This is how I glue every single frag I make.

+1. It will not kill your coral!!!

Mark9
11/17/2016, 02:15 PM
I've heard of people fragging elegance coral and super gluing the cut.
I myself frag lots of corals and sometimes accidentally get super glue on the coral, never had anything die.

Wazzel
11/18/2016, 08:33 AM
I do not. It will kill what ever part of the coral it covers, but will not kill anything more, but that is not my reason. The base of my frags usually get glue on them, but not a big deal.

If you put a blob of super glue on the frag site you will get a node instead of a clean heal. If you do that often enough your corals will start to look like crepe myrtles that have been over pruned.

CrayolaViolence
11/19/2016, 05:29 AM
I've actually used super glue to save acros that have started to blow their zooxanthellae for whatever reason. I've covered the bad spots with the glue and the acro will often quit dying and begin healing. I've also put glue on the ends of cut places to keep out bacteria or disease. Usually the coral will encrust over the spot within a few weeks and continue growing. The only think you have to be careful of is the glue catching the water current when wet and making a thin sheet that can cover spots you don't want covered. Overall I've not found this to be a big enough issue not to do it. I've also taken broken bits and shoved them into the substrate to cover the ends. Weeks later they will have begun to grow over the substrate at which time I pull them out and attach them to a plug. I've found that pushing acros into substrate when they are showing signs of necrosis often saves them as well. I'm lucky this doesn't happen too often, but when it does, these are the methods I use to stop the die off.