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TokiHacker
01/22/2017, 07:41 PM
Ok so I got a 3-4 inch peacock today and got him in his own 29gal tank. Looked good going in but now just sits behind a rock. He hasn't tried to burrow or anything.... making me a bit nervous. Water is good and temp is around 75 right now.... maybe just getting use to the new tank?


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TokiHacker
01/22/2017, 10:12 PM
Ok so now he is laying on his back and moving just his little swimmers.... according to looking at the forums a stress molt is happening... I just freaking got him today!!! I hope he makes it I know to leave off the light which I am even covered the tank with towels since he is in a regular lit room. Any other suggestions?


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TokiHacker
01/23/2017, 11:08 AM
Ok so I took a little glance at him this morning.... I can't tell if it is a shell or not but I see little appendages in the sand. He also looks like he is still in there


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Mr. Manty
01/23/2017, 05:38 PM
Just whatever you do do not mess with the tank. He is very voulnerable.

TokiHacker
01/23/2017, 11:44 PM
Just whatever you do do not mess with the tank. He is very voulnerable.



Thanks for the reply. How long before I can check on him and turn on lights or etc


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TokiHacker
01/24/2017, 09:45 PM
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170125/8620175f5ad8cb6fdfea5a8a43fc0943.jpg

Well he made it! Looking good!


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Hadla
01/24/2017, 10:23 PM
I don't think that's a peacock.

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 07:43 AM
I don't think that's a peacock.

That is what it was advertised.

Bugboy2020
01/25/2017, 10:09 AM
It looks more like a Chiragra to me, but I'm not very good at identifying Mantis Shrimp. But that's definitely not a Peacock.
G. Chiragra
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/arthropoda/crustacea/malacostraca/eumalacostraca/royslist/species.php?name=g_chiragra
O. Scyllarus
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/arthropoda/crustacea/malacostraca/eumalacostraca/royslist/species.php?name=o_scyllarus

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 10:30 AM
I thought the coloration issue was from the molt


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Gonodactylus
01/25/2017, 10:54 AM
Definately not a peacock mantis. It is a Gonodactylus chiragra. G. chiragra is one of the most common stomatopods in the Indo-Pacific is are found living in the low intertidal in cavities in beach rock, breccia, coralline algae and coral rubble. The cavities are easy to spot at low tide and the animals leave their cavities to forage in very shallow water. This makes them very easy to collect and inexpensive. Wholesale they can sell for $5-10, up to a tenth the cost of a large O. scyllarus which are found in deeper water and are much more difficult to capture.

One confusing thing. Did you take this photo after you though the animal molted? It has algae growing around its head and carapace. This should have been shed with the old exoskeleton when it molted.

Algae growing on a gonodactylid is usually a sign that the animal has been in an open environment for some time. This typically happens when the stomatopod is held in a store for weeks without a cavity to live in. The algae interferes with molting and many animals that have this problem die. As a rule of thumb, if you see a mantis shrimp in a store with tuffs of algae (red is the worst), I would recommend not to buy it.

Roy

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 10:59 AM
Definately not a peacock mantis. It is a Gonodactylus chiragra. G. chiragra is one of the most common stomatopods in the Indo-Pacific is are found living in the low intertidal in cavities in beach rock, breccia, coralline algae and coral rubble. The cavities are easy to spot at low tide and the animals leave their cavities to forage in very shallow water. This makes them very easy to collect and inexpensive. Wholesale they can sell for $5-10, up to a tenth the cost of a large O. scyllarus which are found in deeper water and are much more difficult to capture.



One confusing thing. Did you take this photo after you though the animal molted? It has algae growing around its head and carapace. This should have been shed with the old exoskeleton when it molted.



Algae growing on a gonodactylid is usually a sign that the animal has been in an open environment for some time. This typically happens when the stomatopod is held in a store for weeks without a cavity to live in. The algae interferes with molting and many animals that have this problem die. As a rule of thumb, if you see a mantis shrimp in a store with tuffs of algae (red is the worst), I would recommend not to buy it.



Roy



Thanks for all that info Roy. He had some rock he got under but he was at the store for quite sometime. So I am assuming a chiragra is significantly cheaper when I will let my friend who is the order know


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TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 11:50 AM
He said it was sold to him as a peacock not a chiragra. He said he will see if he can get a different source.

What are the life expectancy on the chiragra? I am not going to get rid of him obviously because he is a good shrimp! What do I need to do about the algae on his head? Anything I can do?

Gonodactylus
01/25/2017, 12:10 PM
G. chiragra have never been formally studied with respect to life history but based on work with similar species, they probably live 6 - 8 years and reach a maximum length of 9-10 cm.

The best thing you can do about the algae is supply the animal with a tight fitting, dark cavity. A piece of black or gray pvc pipe about 6-8 inches long and with an inside diameter of about 1 inch would do. Also provide the animal with some gravel and shells so that it can close up the cavity.

Roy

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 01:52 PM
Thanks Roy for all the info! 9-10 cm? that is like 3-4 inches. I thought he would get bigger than that lol. But he will have plenty of space and a new tunnel tonight! Thanks so much.

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 03:15 PM
I have another question Roy. I haven't heard him use his smashers. He digs a lot. Is this normal after a molt?

Gonodactylus
01/25/2017, 04:13 PM
An adult G. chiragra won't generally strike for a couple of weeks following a molt. It takes time for the cuticle to harden.

Roy

TokiHacker
01/25/2017, 04:41 PM
An adult G. chiragra won't generally strike for a couple of weeks following a molt. It takes time for the cuticle to harden.



Roy



I thought so just making sure. Thanks!!


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Newfishgirl
02/10/2017, 07:21 PM
I've had 2 chiragras and I liked them just as much as my peacock. I had a male and a female and the male. That looks like a female to me as well from the picture. Either way they are amazing and enjoy :)


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Hadla
02/10/2017, 07:53 PM
I've had 2 chiragras and I liked them just as much as my peacock. I had a male and a female and the male. That looks like a female to me as well from the picture. Either way they are amazing and enjoy :)


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Did you have the chiragras together?

Newfishgirl
02/12/2017, 08:33 AM
No. I actually thought about. Breeding a pair, but our male, Kane died during his molt. I got the female, Lilith after


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Newfishgirl
02/12/2017, 08:33 AM
It...is suppose to go after about :)


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TokiHacker
02/23/2017, 12:12 PM
G. chiragra have never been formally studied with respect to life history but based on work with similar species, they probably live 6 - 8 years and reach a maximum length of 9-10 cm.

The best thing you can do about the algae is supply the animal with a tight fitting, dark cavity. A piece of black or gray pvc pipe about 6-8 inches long and with an inside diameter of about 1 inch would do. Also provide the animal with some gravel and shells so that it can close up the cavity.

Roy

Hey Doc,

I wanted to let you know that the algae is gone now. Has been for a bit just forgot to update you. And he is now doing plenty of smashing.