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View Full Version : Large Fish Move Ideas Needed


TitanTV
05/01/2017, 01:38 PM
All,

So, I knew this day would come in the future but about 10 years ago when I set up my tank I had no idea my Titan Trigger (Nacho) would even still be around.

I am now faced with quite a decision. How to move and care for Nacho in the future. My new house is not going to be really set up for a large tank anytime in the future but honestly I am pretty sure I can get away with a smaller system. Currently Nacho is in about a 400 gallon tank all by himself and he has only basically doubled in size in the past ten years. (Went from about 4 inches to 7.5 inches). At his current size I could get him into a much smaller aquarium if need be for the near future (I will not be moving the current tank with me as its too large and would probably cost more to move than buy new).

My question is has anyone kept fish in any sort of transportable containers for an extended period of time? We unfortunately will need to sell our current place and then rent/stay with family for a bit before moving into our new house several hundred miles away.

I have had Nacho for so long that he is part of the family. This is going to be a tough thing to make happen and I have toyed with the idea of even calling around some public aquariums to see if they'd be interested in giving him a new home.

Anyhow, any advise or ideas would be great.

Thanks

cougareyes
05/01/2017, 02:29 PM
Not all do this, but we have a really cool lfs owner here that has housed fish and corals while people were moving. If you have a good relationship with an lfs, check there first.

If you were going to give him a new home, not just public aquariums but hotels, restaurants, and bars sometimes have 1000g plus aquariums. Check with any local aquarium maintenance companies.

anbosu
05/01/2017, 04:47 PM
People use the intex above ground pools for sharks, they might work for a trigger too.

wii64brawl
05/01/2017, 05:12 PM
A big plastic stock tank would work well. You could get one that's several hundred gallons for no more than $150 or so, throw in a heater and powerhead, maybe a few pieces of rock, and you're good to go as long as you keep up with maintenance.

anbosu
05/02/2017, 09:23 AM
A big plastic stock tank would work well. You could get one that's several hundred gallons for no more than $150 or so, throw in a heater and powerhead, maybe a few pieces of rock, and you're good to go as long as you keep up with maintenance.

A 300 gallon rubbermaid stock tank is a great idea. A 100 gallon might work too.

TitanTV
05/08/2017, 11:49 AM
cool..thanks all