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blind1993
05/11/2017, 06:23 AM
Hey I'm going to Thailand for a few months next year to do my divemaster training. Does anyone have advice on a camera, housing, and light setup or on where to get a decent used one without taking out a student loan...

FishN00b83
05/11/2017, 12:23 PM
Hey I'm going to Thailand for a few months next year to do my divemaster training. Does anyone have advice on a camera, housing, and light setup or on where to get a decent used one without taking out a student loan...

Are you looking for a point and shoot or a DSLR? Will you be taking photos underwater?

blind1993
05/11/2017, 01:08 PM
Are you looking for a point and shoot or a DSLR? Will you be taking photos underwater?
Preferably a DSLR but open to some of the nicer point and shoots. And yes definately using underwater

FishN00b83
05/11/2017, 03:21 PM
Preferably a DSLR but open to some of the nicer point and shoots. And yes definately using underwater

IDK what system you prefer, I like Nikon. An entry level Nikon DSLR would run you 4-500 with a 18-55mm kit lens (which you might not want to use). You'd have to decide what lens you'd like to use, and you'd probably want a fast lens. If you like wide shots the Nikon 20mm F/1.8 would be a good choice, or the 14-24mm F/2.8 (this lens is $$$). A normal 35mm (crop sensor) or 50mm (full frame) would be a solid normal lens. If you want something longer a 85mm F/1.8 or the manual focus 105mm F/1.8 would work. I'd try to avoid zooms unless it's internal focus because of the lens port and the extra F stops will come in handy. If you're into marco photography obviously a macro lens would be a better choice.

What is going to kill you is the underwater housing. An Ikelite case without a lens port will be around 1500-1800 bucks. The lens port will be an additional 4-600. Don't think about one of those bags, it will flood and you'll be out a camera. if you get a DSLR get a housing.

If you're not going to shoot in RAW and edit in Lightroom, Optics Pro, or Capture One, a point and shoot might be a better option. You can get a Canon G7X with a underwater housing for around 800 and it's definitely capable of taking solid pictures. With point and shoots you just want to make sure the shutter lag is as short as possible, especially if you're taking shots of fish.

I wouldn't recommend buying this stuff used if you could avoid it. You're not going to save a whole lot on a DSLR unless someone is just dumping the camera and glass holds its value pretty well. You might be able to get a deal on a point and shoot but what are you really going to save? When it comes to stuff like this I think the warranty is definitely worth it. if something goes wrong it's really nice to know you can send it in to get it fixed.

blind1993
05/11/2017, 05:15 PM
IDK what system you prefer, I like Nikon. An entry level Nikon DSLR would run you 4-500 with a 18-55mm kit lens (which you might not want to use). You'd have to decide what lens you'd like to use, and you'd probably want a fast lens. If you like wide shots the Nikon 20mm F/1.8 would be a good choice, or the 14-24mm F/2.8 (this lens is $$$). A normal 35mm (crop sensor) or 50mm (full frame) would be a solid normal lens. If you want something longer a 85mm F/1.8 or the manual focus 105mm F/1.8 would work. I'd try to avoid zooms unless it's internal focus because of the lens port and the extra F stops will come in handy. If you're into marco photography obviously a macro lens would be a better choice.

What is going to kill you is the underwater housing. An Ikelite case without a lens port will be around 1500-1800 bucks. The lens port will be an additional 4-600. Don't think about one of those bags, it will flood and you'll be out a camera. if you get a DSLR get a housing.

If you're not going to shoot in RAW and edit in Lightroom, Optics Pro, or Capture One, a point and shoot might be a better option. You can get a Canon G7X with a underwater housing for around 800 and it's definitely capable of taking solid pictures. With point and shoots you just want to make sure the shutter lag is as short as possible, especially if you're taking shots of fish.

I wouldn't recommend buying this stuff used if you could avoid it. You're not going to save a whole lot on a DSLR unless someone is just dumping the camera and glass holds its value pretty well. You might be able to get a deal on a point and shoot but what are you really going to save? When it comes to stuff like this I think the warranty is definitely worth it. if something goes wrong it's really nice to know you can send it in to get it fixed.

Dude thank you so much for taking the time to type all that out. I'm definately getting the housing; if you're going to do something...do it right.

I'm planning on slowly buying these things over the next year but starting out with the DSLR or the G7x. Do you have recommendation on which model to get? I'm down to spend the money if the extra features will make a big difference in my pictures. I'm not doing this as a career or anything but I do plan on having an Instagram account that makes my non scuba friends jealous hahaha.

I do want to shoot in RAW because all of my GoPro pictures are washed out and pretty much useless... but I don't plan on doing any deep diving. I'm more into corals, fish, landscapes, and other animals that I don't need a microscope to see.

Based on that what dslr and lens would you recommend (probably no manual focusing though, I'm not a photography extraordinaire...yet). Would the DSLR really be worth it over the G7x or the new GoPro with a light and some filters?

Also very good point about the warranty.

FishN00b83
05/11/2017, 09:50 PM
Honestly if you're going to buy this stuff over the next year or so buy a body with a kit lens and see where you are comfortable shooting from. Any Nikon in the 3-7000 range has the same sensor, the higher numbers really just have more features. I have a 3300 body and I shoot over 90% of my shots with a 35mm prime. The bokah is not as creamy as the 85 or the sigma art but it's a great, sharp everyday lens that's capable of taking extremely nice photos. For underwater photography you might want something a little longer, it's really up to the individual.

I would say buy what your comfortable with. If you like some of the features of the 5000 or 7000 then go for it, for me a flip out screen, wifi, Bluetooth, and more AF points just wasn't worth the money. When I started I didn't think I was going to get so into it. I bought the camera to take pictures of my new born and family and it just grew into an obsession. Now I don't leave home with out my camera bag, I never thought I would be like this but I find it to be a lot of fun and relaxing.

Picking a camera is really up to you. Go to a camera shop and hold a bunch in your hands, see which ones you like to hold. The nikons just feel right in my hands and I really like the glass they offer. I have had nothing but great experiences with Nikon products. You'll find the other 50% of the photography world will say the same about canon.

I am not familiar with GoPros. They might be worth it, they might not, a lot of this is subjective. People have different opinions on what is worth it or not. To me, a dslr is worth carrying around. Some people think I'm crazy and would never carry anything but a compact point and shot or a cell phone.

I would go to a camera shop and hold a bunch of cameras and see which ones feel good in your hands. Make a decision based on how you feel. If you think the GoPro and light will cover your needs, then go for it. To me the dslr is worth the bulk and like I said I never leave the house without it. You might feel the point and shoot can cover you needs just fine. I would hate to tell you to buy a dslr and you feel overwhelmed or you just use it in auto mode, it would be a waste. See what you're comfortable with and go from there.


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