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purge43
05/29/2017, 01:02 AM
I came to a conclusion a long time ago that the liquid from a lot of frozen food cubes is exceptionally high in phosphates and ever since I percolate and rinse frozen mysis cylops etc etc. Id like to save some time and just drop a cube in the display but I'm left with a question, if I percolate and rinse a whole pack of frozen cubes, then refreeze them with di in the same pack they came in, would this destroy any nutritional value?

ericarenee
05/29/2017, 08:29 AM
I stopped buying the frozen cubes because they waste a lot of money. i get the frozen blocks put it in a zip lock baggie and then smash it up ..Saves money and not full of RAW Nutrient Liquid....

ca1ore
05/29/2017, 10:48 AM
I came to a conclusion a long time ago that the liquid from a lot of frozen food cubes is exceptionally high in phosphates.

Based on what? I've come to the exact opposite conclusion :lol: There have been a few studies conducted that suggest rinsing frozen has no effect. Not trying to disabuse you of your 'sacred cows', but your efforts may be in vain. BTW, flat packs are better than cubes if you have the freezer space.

BigBlueTang
05/29/2017, 10:51 AM
Based on what? I've come to the exact opposite conclusion :lol: There have been a few studies conducted that suggest rinsing frozen has no effect. Not trying to disabuse you of your 'sacred cows', but your efforts may be in vain. BTW, flat packs are better than cubes if you have the freezer space.

Why's that? I'm curious, I've always used the cubes, but am interested in the flats..

ca1ore
05/29/2017, 11:12 AM
Why's that? I'm curious, I've always used the cubes, but am interested in the flats..

I have a large fish population that get fed a lot. You get a lot more for your money wth the flats (do the math per oz. and you'll see what I mean). Also, if I break off a cube-sided chunk from the flats, there's more food and less water than the cubes. I do keep some cubes around for ease of feeding by my kids when I'm away though.

BigBlueTang
05/29/2017, 11:14 AM
I have a large fish population that get fed a lot. You get a lot more for your money wth the flats (do the math per oz. and you'll see what I mean). Also, if I break off a cube-sided chunk from the flats, there's more food and less water than the cubes. I do keep some cubes around for ease of feeding by my kids when I'm away though.

Ahh I see, thank you for the explanation. Yeah, I only have five fish so it's simply easier for me to drop in half a cube per day, but once I get more, flat packs are probably necessary..

smatter
05/29/2017, 11:05 PM
Rinsing frozen food is like not mopping up the liquor of a delicious bowl of steamed clams with a crusty piece of sourdough.

JWClark
05/30/2017, 11:49 AM
I like the flats but want the ease of the cubes so I cut the flats into cubes of desired size on a frozen cutting board. Then re-pack in a zip lock bag and lay flat in the freezer as quickly as possible. Using a large knife and a frozen cutting board ensures the food has almost no time to start thawing.

I've always been more concerned with phosphates in my dry food as opposed to frozen.

Dxpert
06/01/2017, 07:01 AM
I have been using the "reef nutrition" liquid food products and I'm very happy with them. I've switched completely from frozen to liquid.

Sounds Fishy
06/02/2017, 12:49 PM
... mopping up the liquor of a delicious bowl of steamed clams with a crusty piece of sourdough.

What a great idea,I never tried that...I am missing out. I am responding to this thread,because,I think there has been a trend for rinsing,frozen foods( whether flats or cubes).Many people have advised me to do this,however,I personally do not rinse,but that was only because I am feeding the frozen food ,into my substrate so my stingray can dig it up and eat it.(I am also lazy)...It helps me that it's frozen at the time because I can grab each piece,with the tongs.I am happy to know that it doesn't seem to affect the overall phosphate level,either way(even though I am still adding phosphates)For 6 months ,I have been feeding daily large amounts of fresh water mysis( extremely greasy food),but you have to feed what your fish selects off the menu.I go through a 1 pound flat pack a month,for this one fish,and flat packs are much cheaper than cubes.

purge43
06/02/2017, 04:03 PM
I wont ever get an answer to my question, this was a waste of my time as I expected... mods please close thread

JonezNReef
06/02/2017, 09:23 PM
I came to a conclusion a long time ago that the liquid from a lot of frozen food cubes is exceptionally high in phosphates and ever since I percolate and rinse frozen mysis cylops etc etc. Id like to save some time and just drop a cube in the display but I'm left with a question, if I percolate and rinse a whole pack of frozen cubes, then refreeze them with di in the same pack they came in, would this destroy any nutritional value?

I tried this with a pack of mysis shrimp that thawed partially on the way home from the store. So because I rinsed my food too at that time I did this. I rinsed it and froze it in di water again but when I thawed it back down the mysis broke down to mush. I don't know if it lost nutritional value but I didn't feed it to my fish. For the last year I haven't rinsed it and haven't seen any ill effect yet. I think my coral might appreciate it since most of them open up when I feed the fish.

JWClark
06/03/2017, 07:41 AM
I wont ever get an answer to my question, this was a waste of my time as I expected... mods please close thread

Think the answer seems to be that your conclusion may be flawed so the question is moot.

That being said, nobody here really knows unless they have done it and then had nutritional values tested. My opinion is that, yes, nutritional value is lost. Things oxidize and breakdown when warm and adding more DI will allow things to diffuse out. If you are set on your procedures based on your personal experiences/conclusions then maybe consider re-freezing with some selcon/vitamin supplement in the DI or something.

hkgar
06/09/2017, 03:49 PM
Make your own frozen food and you know what it is. that is what I do and soak the various parts (clams, oysters, mussels, shrimp, squid and cod) in ro water for a couple hours to reduce phosphates.

SpottedMoocow
06/19/2017, 04:59 PM
Here's some info behind phosphates in your food. A good read based on facts.

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2012/3/chemistry

Moort82
06/20/2017, 05:04 AM
I wont ever get an answer to my question, this was a waste of my time as I expected... mods please close thread

Your question was answered in the first reply. If you look at the like in post 15 you will see one of the most respected chemists in aquatics has debunked the myth that the water holds excessive phosphates. So feeding the whole cube won't really cause any issues.

MiddletoM
06/20/2017, 05:46 AM
maybe BRS can do a 'BRS Investigates' on this and finally put the issue to bed.

I feed marinemix cubes and PE Mysis flat pack and have done for about a year now, no substantial Phosphate issues, certainly nothing rowaphos cant deal with.

Devaji108
06/26/2017, 05:01 PM
I like to DIY my own food, that way I know whats in it. plus its more cost effective.
i do not rise before adding it to the tank. buts thats just me...