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View Full Version : Advice on Recovery of this LPS


ebjorklu
05/29/2017, 02:51 PM
I picked this the attached at an LFS two days ago.

1) I'm trying to identify it for sure. I'm thinking at this point it's most likely Euphyllia divisa (frogspawn). Anybody able to help me corroborate that from the attached picture?

I thought there was an outside chance it was Plerogyra sinuosa with an infection of some type of partially symbiotic flatworm like "Acoel". But after a progressive dip of CoralRx followed by Bayer Advanced didn't produce any effect (which was a positive sign), I doubt this.

2) Does anyone have any care advice to give this the best chance to recover (and hopefully thrive)? At this point, I've got it in quarantine and will keep flow and light on the low side for a few days. Nitrate and Phosphate were at 5 ppm and 0.04 ppm in my QT today (I'm also QT'ing a new Yellow Watchman Gobi and Tiger Pistol Shrimp right now), so I did a 30% WC and may do more regular WC's to keep Nitrate and Phosphate levels from irritating this new addition.

Thanks in advance for any input you have!

quantumfuzz
05/29/2017, 03:52 PM
Yep, looks like a frogspawn to me as well. I know mine and most others I've read about on the forums like medium to high lighting and flow. Mine is closer to the top with good flow and is only happy there. I guess after a few days of acclimation just work him up to where he will be happy and hope for the best.

ebjorklu
06/07/2017, 12:50 PM
Here's a quick update, with two photo's from today attached here. This coral seems to be doing much better now after a week and a half.

However, I am wondering now if anyone out there thinks this may be a Plerogyra (Bubble Coral) or even possibly a Physogyra rather than a Euphyllia (i.e. Frogspawn)?

I've never had any of these three before, but these seem much more like bubbles that inflate in the morning when the lights come on and then deflate at night when the lights go off.

When deflated I can see a number of fairly sharp vertical ridges (septa?) on the edge of the body of the coral. Though the body also looks much more like a wall-type of Euphylia than

Let me know if anyone has any additional thoughts given the newest photos.

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lilyost4290
06/07/2017, 01:00 PM
def looks like a frogspawn to me based on the multiple tips on each tentacle

WLachnit
06/07/2017, 01:46 PM
def looks like a frogspawn to me based on the multiple tips on each tentacle



Yup...agree.

Munster49
06/07/2017, 01:53 PM
Looks more like octospawn to me. My frogspawn looks nothing like that.

lilyost4290
06/07/2017, 02:30 PM
Looks more like octospawn to me. My frogspawn looks nothing like that.

I always thought these were basically the same? either way some type of Euphyllia

ebjorklu
06/08/2017, 09:38 AM
Looks more like octospawn to me. My frogspawn looks nothing like that.

Thanks everyone for the responses.

Thanks Munster49 for the octospawn 'tip'. I hadn't heard this term before and did a quick Google Images search for it and came up with this picture, which I suspect is what my specific coral will start to look like as it (hopefully) regains it's full health.

In all of your collective experience, does frogspawn have any trouble with moderate flow (or higher)? I originally had this in a moderate flow area in my QT system (though admittedly 'moderate flow' is very hard to define with any precision) and it looked one of the 'bubbles' was punctured by the sharp septa on the edge of the stony part of the coral.

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Munster49
06/09/2017, 06:49 AM
All of my euphyllia (2 hammers, 1 frogspawn, 1 torch) are in a low flow area. They just kind of gently sway and are doing great. I have seen tanks that have them in much higher flow than mine, but I have heard that they can damage themselves on their own skeletons, or on nearby rocks if they have too much movement.

ktownhero
06/09/2017, 08:58 AM
All of my euphyllia (2 hammers, 1 frogspawn, 1 torch) are in a low flow area. They just kind of gently sway and are doing great. I have seen tanks that have them in much higher flow than mine, but I have heard that they can damage themselves on their own skeletons, or on nearby rocks if they have too much movement.

I have a large thick-branched frogspawn that has always been in a high flow area of my tank, and it's always happy. I used to worry about it, but it doesn't seem to mind the occasional abuse. My hammer is in a lower flow area, and I still can't figure out where my torch likes it best. I finally settled it in a high-ish flow area and it's doing fine though it doesn't extend as much as I'd like. But as long as it is healthy :)