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azsoccerpop
06/14/2017, 07:25 AM
Does anyone here have a recommendation for a vendor that stocks Schedule 80 PVC fittings with BSPP thread. I juts don't have the room for the Unions that are sent with the 1". I am looking for 90 degree elbows and couplers that have 1" BSPP thread x Slip and if it exists 1" x 1" x 1/2" Tees with the 1/2" threaded and 1" slips at the ends. I have searched endlessly on the internet and many of the local Arizona Plumbing suppliers have no idea where to source. Any Help is greatly appreciated :headwally:

azsoccerpop
06/14/2017, 08:39 AM
I just got off the Phone with Craig as KSC Direct. very helpful and able to source everything I needed. I can recommend them for those having a hard time plumbing in the FMM sensors which use the BSPP threads. I would like to know why Neptune chose to use flow sensors with thread that is not standard in USA but that is likely a cost and compatibility answer. It would however seem to me that if the major market is here then shipping those sensors with standard NPT thread and NPT Unions and Couplers to the rest of the world could prove to be better marketing and maybe less expensive in the end. My 2 cents.

FullBoreReefer
06/14/2017, 10:19 AM
BSPP is a sore subject. Cost savings for sure, plus how many people will just buy new sensors instead of the frustration of finding fittings. Bad manufacturer choice for the ending consumer. Hell neptune doesn't even sell them!

kurt_n
06/14/2017, 09:27 PM
I don't think it's necessarily a cost savings... NPT or BSPT is used pretty much the world around and you don't take a cost hit versus BSPP. But the tapered thread (NPT or BSPT) are interference threads and in plastic have a somewhat limited life before they start leaking. The seal is made by jamming the thread material into each other. Using a parallel thread with a gasket (BSPP) gives you a joint that's secure and leakproof that doesn't depend on material giving way - the seal is made by compressing a replaceable gasket. Granted, BSPP is a difficult fitting to find in the US, but from an engineering standpoint is probably the better choice.

FullBoreReefer
06/15/2017, 08:19 AM
Leaking isn't the issue here, it's that they left us with no easily accessible replacement parts, hoping we dish out more for new sensors when you can no longer join pipe from cutting etc.

xoomer
07/05/2017, 04:49 PM
I don't think these are BSPP threads, they are BSPT threads.

Look at this video for reference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07lQIIJyWuc&feature=youtu.be



I believe the answer is simple, flow meters with BSPT threads were already available in the market; eerie resemblance is probably no coinkydink

search your favorite "AtoZ" .com store for DIGITEN G2 and you'll see which route im going next. Comes in all sort of standard sizes and the issue that most people complaint about in the reviews re calibration is null because Neptune software is already set for each dia size. I actually ordered an FMM with one sensor to verify.


One can easily find adapters at flexpvc.com, just search for bspt in the search box.

https://flexpvc.com

Hope this helps.

kurt_n
07/06/2017, 07:44 AM
I don't think these are BSPP threads, they are BSPT threads.
...

Looking at the video, yup.

Ignore my previous post - I was assuming the original post info was correct and didn't take the time to dig deeper. Google search BSPT and you should find a fair amount of adapters/fittings. While it's not NPT, it's used fairly frequently in the US on industrial equipment.

TerenceF
07/06/2017, 08:44 AM
The fittings are BSPP. British standard parallel pipethread. BSPT fittings will work on BSPP with the proper sealant techniques.

While many fittings are available, adapters to standard size slip fittings are less so - but can be found at the link above for sure - and unions that convert BSPP to standard USA slip fittings are not easy to find - though spears does make them.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

kurt_n
07/06/2017, 07:41 PM
The fittings are BSPP.

Umm... then you better update your video. Take a look at around the 0:50 mark. The narrator and graphic specifically state BSPT fittings, and that's also what shown on the actual equipment.

BSPT fittings will work on BSPP with the proper sealant techniques.

If by "proper sealant techniques" you mean goober it up with a sealant and over torque it until it stops leaking then yes, you're correct. But that's not really the advice I'd be giving out. But hey... it's not my company! :)

TerenceF
07/06/2017, 08:54 PM
It is possible that there was a mistake on a video - I will look into it. The fittings on the flow sensors are most certainly BSPP.

For low pressure applications, the taper found on "xPT" fittings is not critical to make the seal.

The important part (in most all of our aquarium applications) is that the thread pitch and angle is correct - that is the key difference between "NPx" and "BSPx" fittings.

kurt_n
07/06/2017, 11:50 PM
It is possible that there was a mistake on a video - I will look into it. The fittings on the flow sensors are most certainly BSPP.

Looking at the photos of the different flow meters on your website, it appears to me that the 2" size could be BSPP, but the 1" and 1/2" sizes are BSPT. The 1/2" size is definitely BSPT. So I think everyone is a little bit right!

BSPP are not a tapered thread and seal by compressing a sealing washer between a shoulder on the male side and the face of the female side. The photo of the 2" meter shows what appears could be a shoulder; the 1" is questionable, but that 1/2" meter definitely has no shoulder.

For low pressure applications, the taper found on "xPT" fittings is not critical to make the seal.

The important part (in most all of our aquarium applications) is that the thread pitch and angle is correct - that is the key difference between "NPx" and "BSPx" fittings.

NPx = NPT (there's only one option): tapered thread, seals by interference at the threads.
BSPT: tapered thread, seals by interference at the threads. Similar to NPT, but has a different thread pitch than NPT... but only by a fraction of an inch.
BSPP: parallel thread, seals by a sealing washer between the faces of the male and female fittings. Can also be referred to as a "G" thread.

As a end user, it's really easy to mismatch NPT and BSPT because they're both interference fit threads. Even with properly matched NPT fittings, you screw them together a few turns and then they start to bind up... like they're supposed to in order to form a seal. But if you screw in a NPT to a BSPT, it starts to thread just like a normal NPT fitting but binds up just a little bit sooner. That binding isn't due to the designed interference of the threaded joint like a normal NPT, but the mismatch in thread pitch. You think you've got a good joint, but when you put pressure to it, it leaks.

TerenceF
07/07/2017, 12:04 AM
The point is, if you screw a male BSPP fitting into a female BSPT fitting, the threads will match and thread sealant will adequately seal the joint for the pressures of most all aquarium applications.

BSPx threads are not just different in pitch, the angle of the threads is also different if I remember correctly.

Although shoulder is one factor in determining whether something may be BSPP - it is a minor difference at that. The more interesting characteristic is that a. The threads have a different pitch and cut angle and b. They are in fact parallel and not angled/tapered.

For reference, the flow sensors are not the only popular product using BSPP with an outer, sealed threaded adapter configuration - this is exactly how many of the Vectra, Deepwater, and other pumps are installed (according to their manufacturers recommendations) right now.