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Charley Diesing
07/03/2017, 05:12 PM
I have a aqueon 125 gallon (72.5 in L x 18.5 in W x 23.75 in H) that is NOT level.

The drop from left to right is 1/8 inch. The drop from front to back is 1/8 inch. So the drop from the front left corner to the back right corner is 1/4 inch. This means there is a slight twist. Is this within a reasonable tolerance or is this going to cause too much strain on the seals?

ericarenee
07/03/2017, 05:20 PM
how long is the level you are using?.. if its 1/8 with a 2 ft level on a 6 foot length its really 3/8

Lsufan
07/03/2017, 06:05 PM
Ericarenee brings up a good point about the length of the level, u may have already factored it in. If all u have is a 2' level it will help to find a board that u can use as a straight edge that is as long as the tank. I get them to where they are close to level & then I place the level caticorner from the back corner to the opposite front corner.

It doesn't sound to bad but it is more then I would like to have. Especially having a twist to it. I'm kind of a perfectionist though, so I always make them about as perfect as u can get. If u have water in the tank already then u may not have to drain it completely. I would only drain it about halfway then try to tap the shims in. If it doesn't work then drain some more water & try it again.

Charley Diesing
07/03/2017, 06:26 PM
I have a aqueon 125 gallon (72.5 in L x 18.5 in W x 23.75 in H) that is NOT level.

The drop from left to right is 1/8 3/16 inch. The drop from front to back is 1/8 between 1/16-1/32nd inch. So the drop from the front left corner to the back right corner is 1/4 inch more like 1/8". This means there is a slight twist. Is this within a reasonable tolerance or is this going to cause too much strain on the seals?

So after factoring in the measuring stick AND remeasuring with the help of a second person. There are some slight changes (in red above)

Charley Diesing
07/03/2017, 06:26 PM
I was using a 3 foot level for the 18" sides and a 6 foot level for the 72" sides.

JTL
07/03/2017, 07:33 PM
The short answer is get perfectly level, it is not that difficult. I just put my DIY stand in the house yesterday and I spent 2 hours messing with it to get it perfect, side to side and cross corners. I never want a tank that is off level, not so much as a structural issue, although it certainly can be, as it is visual. Admittedly, I am anal about things being straight and square.

WillsNano63
07/03/2017, 07:45 PM
using a piece of closed cell foam (Puzzle pieces 2x2 ft.) under the edges/tank - would this not correct the offset of levelling (1/4") that may not be fixable due to a un-perfect level floor or would shims be a better choice between floor and stand?

JTL
07/03/2017, 08:27 PM
Shims would be best in imo.

der_wille_zur_macht
07/04/2017, 07:22 AM
There are two very, very different issues here that are easy to confuse - but very different.

Think of the bottom of the tank as four points - one for each corner. The first question is: Are those four points true (laying on the same plane)? The second question is: Is that plane level?

If the bottom of the tank is not true, you will have structural issues. It's a problem. If the bottom of the tank is not level, it's more of just an inconvenience - the water won't be level in the tank, your overflow box might behave weirdly (the water will flow faster at one end versus the other), but the tank isn't going to fail.

Ideally, you want to solve BOTH problems. But in terms of "danger" - really the only question is wether or not the bottom of the tank is resting on a true plane. Luckily, the easiest thing to do is to just solve both problems at once. If the tank is reading as dead on level from side to side at both the front and the back, and front to back at both ends, it's both true and level.

Don't try to correct EITHER problem with foam. At best, foam is for small surface imperfections. It will not correctly solve trueness or leveling problems. If your stand does not have leveling feet, you really need to shim. Ideally between the stand and the floor, as this keeps the stand to tank interface intact. When you're leveling, make sure you're not introducing trueness problems. Shim in multiple points until the level is centered in all four tests (front to back at each end, and side to side at the front and back). Then, go back through and make sure the tension on each shim is the same - you don't want to end up with all the weight resting on one single shim under one corner with the rest of the shims just sitting there doing nothing, since this can give the appearance of a level stand but result in trueness issues once the weight of the full system causes the stand to settle.

JTL
07/04/2017, 07:43 AM
I have built my previous DT's with raised bottoms and recently did the same with my DIY sump. As Willie explained the four corners still need to be on the same plane, but any imperfections inside of the perimeter can be ignored and no foam pad is required. Unfortunately, I don't think most tanks are constructed this way, at least my new one isn't.

billdogg
07/04/2017, 07:44 AM
There are two very, very different issues here that are easy to confuse - but very different.

Think of the bottom of the tank as four points - one for each corner. The first question is: Are those four points true (laying on the same plane)? The second question is: Is that plane level?

If the bottom of the tank is not true, you will have structural issues. It's a problem. If the bottom of the tank is not level, it's more of just an inconvenience - the water won't be level in the tank, your overflow box might behave weirdly (the water will flow faster at one end versus the other), but the tank isn't going to fail.

Ideally, you want to solve BOTH problems. But in terms of "danger" - really the only question is wether or not the bottom of the tank is resting on a true plane. Luckily, the easiest thing to do is to just solve both problems at once. If the tank is reading as dead on level from side to side at both the front and the back, and front to back at both ends, it's both true and level.

Don't try to correct EITHER problem with foam. At best, foam is for small surface imperfections. It will not correctly solve trueness or leveling problems. If your stand does not have leveling feet, you really need to shim. Ideally between the stand and the floor, as this keeps the stand to tank interface intact. When you're leveling, make sure you're not introducing trueness problems. Shim in multiple points until the level is centered in all four tests (front to back at each end, and side to side at the front and back). Then, go back through and make sure the tension on each shim is the same - you don't want to end up with all the weight resting on one single shim under one corner with the rest of the shims just sitting there doing nothing, since this can give the appearance of a level stand but result in trueness issues once the weight of the full system causes the stand to settle.

^^^This^^^

Very concise explanation of a very common problem.