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FishNDip
07/06/2017, 06:25 PM
So I'm wondering if tempature swings in Southern California are going to affect my tank in a negative way. I've heard the ideal temp you want your tank at is 76-78 or 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit. My tank stays around 80 or 82 during the day and sometimes goes to 84. This temp I hope is fine for long term? :confused:

mcgyvr
07/06/2017, 06:31 PM
Those temps should not be an issue at all..
http://web.archive.org/web/20030218193420/www.animalnetwork.com/fish2/aqfm/1997/nov/features/1/default.asp

sdbc
07/06/2017, 06:49 PM
Yeah, we're in for a hot one in the next few days. I have a hydnophora that bleaches every time the tank temp goes over 81 (I try to keep it at 79). That's the only coral I've had that reacts that way. A fan blowing at or better still over the top of the tank will drop the temp a couple of degrees if you are worried about it.

phillipw
07/06/2017, 07:07 PM
I second the fan. It is a cheap way to lower the temp, just be prepared for a little more evaporation..

FishNDip
07/06/2017, 08:10 PM
I second the fan. It is a cheap way to lower the temp, just be prepared for a little more evaporation..

Thanks for the article.

Forgot to mention it's summer time in Cali and it's probably going to get in the 90's while I'm on vaca this month. I assume water in the wild gets to 90 sometimes? So changes like that shouldn't be to much I hope.

Ron Reefman
07/07/2017, 03:08 AM
I snorkel a lot of shallow flats (2' to 6') areas in the Florida Keys and there are some areas that are covered with coral (a very few that tolerate the heat). In August the water temp (in the shallows) can get to 90F at slack tide. But the places where the corals grow best are place with quite strong tidal currents which do bring in cooler water. Out on the deeper water reefs (10' to 40') it's maybe 2 to 4 degrees cooler and more stable even with tides.

jeffmerrill
07/13/2017, 07:36 PM
I agre with the fan recommendation, living in a hatter climate, it really helps.

thegrun
07/13/2017, 08:21 PM
I let my tank drop to a low of 76 during the winter and use fans to keep the upper temperature at a high of 82 during the summer. Two summers ago we took a trip to Sequoia and I set the AC at 82, but my wife not realizing I wanted the AC left on turned it off. It was a hot week (105) in Garden Grove while we were gone and since there was no internet access in Sequoia, I had no way to check in on my Apex controller to see how the tank was doing. When we got home the inside the house temperature was 92, but with just fans blowing across the water surface the tank was only 82 degrees. I checked my Apex log and 82 was as warm as the tank ever got.

KingOfAll_Tyrants
07/15/2017, 10:33 AM
I snorkel a lot of shallow flats (2' to 6') areas in the Florida Keys and there are some areas that are covered with coral (a very few that tolerate the heat). In August the water temp (in the shallows) can get to 90F at slack tide. But the places where the corals grow best are place with quite strong tidal currents which do bring in cooler water. Out on the deeper water reefs (10' to 40') it's maybe 2 to 4 degrees cooler and more stable even with tides.

+1 to Ron. I spent the last two week evenings/weekends snorkeling shallow parts of the Hawaiian islands. It's very hard to find coral (save for some small colonies of hardy corals, e.g. porites lobata which is not sold commercially bc it's not to pretty) in the shallow sections. It's also common to find dead/half dead corals in the 10-20' zone, presumably bc those species couldn't take the warmer/more polluted/whatever water. Most interesting was to see half bleached 3 foot Montipora plates in sunny spots of a tide pool, and massive 4-6 foot plates in somewhat deeper, more shaded spots maybe 40 feet away.

Bottom line: I'd try to keep my temperature constant, and try hard to avoid temperatures over 80F.