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Mr. Eel
07/10/2017, 08:22 PM
I have always thought sharks were cool and I now think I may be making a 4 or 5 hundred gal tank. But then I saw that sharks were ranked expert only. I am basically wondering is there any real reason except for the need of a large tank that sharks are expert only or do they also lack hardiness or have other needs that I have not yet stumbled upon through my research.

krj-1168
07/10/2017, 09:05 PM
Sharks & rays are generally considered to be for expert saltwater aquarists - because most beginner or intermediate aquarists have difficulties properly caring for them. In other words they tend to make a lot of beginner mistakes. In fact many local fish shops and saltwater aquarists tend to avoid keeping sharks or rays - because they falsely believe that they are nearly impossible to keep in home aquaria. Which is total false. It's just that keeping sharks or rays - require a lot of work, and may be even some thinking out side they typical saltwater box.

Sharks & rays are generally very sensitive to poor water conditions(high nitrates, any nitrites or ammonia), & some kinds of meds (specifically copper-based). For this reason most shark & ray aquarists - have a powerful, effective filtration system for shark/ray tanks and ponds. Also some other fishes(specifically triggers, puffers, angels, lionfishes, butterflies) can be a threat or danger to benthic sharks & stingrays.

As for tank size - that sharks and rays require - that depends on the species. The best sharks for an aquarists looking to keep them - are the benthic species - such as the bamboo sharks,& epaulette(long tailed carpet sharks), and tropical catshark (genus Atelomycterus). These tend to be the most affordable, the most hardy, and easiest to care for.

The Coral Catshark & Australian Marbled catshark (genus Atelomycterus) tend to max out at about 24-27 inches (60-70 cm), As such it is possible to keep one(for life) in a 180-300 gallon tank or pond.

The bamboo sharks & Epaulettes tend to max out at between 30-48 inches(76-122 cm). To keep one for life - you will need a 300-750 gallon tank or pond.

enjetek
07/10/2017, 10:47 PM
^ good advice. If you get a benthic shark a nice shallow tank with a lot of surface area will be good. Just be ready to go to the market for food too. I had 2 bamboos, a horn, and a coral cat shark and it wasn't as exciting at the end as normal aggressive fish.


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Mr. Eel
07/11/2017, 06:42 AM
Thanks, but I have never heard lionfishes were a threat because they wont pick at the eyes is there some other reason that lionfishes are a threat to sharks. Also I have heard that tangs may pick at the eyes is this false?

krj-1168
07/11/2017, 10:33 AM
Yes - tangs can also be a threat also - because of picking at the eyes of sharks and rays. Basically any fish with a small mouth can pick at sharks or rays eyes.

As for lionfish - it more about their venomous barbs. Those can injure the shark or ray. I have heard of several stories from shark aquarists who lost both the shark and the lionfish - after the two fought each other. Both died from their injuries they received in battle. Remember - both sharks and lionfishes are predators - and predators sometimes fight.

FinnCole
07/11/2017, 10:49 AM
Sharks & rays are generally considered to be for expert saltwater aquarists - because most beginner or intermediate aquarists have difficulties properly caring for them. In other words they tend to make a lot of beginner mistakes. In fact many local fish shops and saltwater aquarists tend to avoid keeping sharks or rays - because they falsely believe that they are nearly impossible to keep in home aquaria. Which is total false. It's just that keeping sharks or rays - require a lot of work, and may be even some thinking out side they typical saltwater box.

Sharks & rays are generally very sensitive to poor water conditions(high nitrates, any nitrites or ammonia), & some kinds of meds (specifically copper-based). For this reason most shark & ray aquarists - have a powerful, effective filtration system for shark/ray tanks and ponds. Also some other fishes(specifically triggers, puffers, angels, lionfishes, butterflies) can be a threat or danger to benthic sharks & stingrays.

As for tank size - that sharks and rays require - that depends on the species. The best sharks for an aquarists looking to keep them - are the benthic species - such as the bamboo sharks,& epaulette(long tailed carpet sharks), and tropical catshark (genus Atelomycterus). These tend to be the most affordable, the most hardy, and easiest to care for.

The Coral Catshark & Australian Marbled catshark (genus Atelomycterus) tend to max out at about 24-27 inches (60-70 cm), As such it is possible to keep one(for life) in a 180-300 gallon tank or pond.

The bamboo sharks & Epaulettes tend to max out at between 30-48 inches(76-122 cm). To keep one for life - you will need a 300-750 gallon tank or pond.
Any shark/ray that would do ok in a 185

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ichthyogeek
07/11/2017, 12:54 PM
I agree with the carpet sharks (catsharks and epaulettes) being your best bet for a 400-500 gallon aquarium, you could probably keep around 2 bamboos and 2 epaulettes. There's also the shark primer that's stickied in this subforum that you can read, as well as a more detailed one on Monster Fish Keepers.

Also, there's also something about sharks not liking sharp (90 degree) corners in their tanks, but it's been a long time since I've read up on them, so you'll have to double check on the internet.

Finally: While you can keep a shark (like a bamboo catshark) in a 180 gallon tank....I would highly suggest against it. IMHO, for large fish, the minimum tank sizes are often never large enough.

Mr. Eel
07/11/2017, 01:10 PM
Also where is my best bet of buying them bc liveaquaria is almost always out of stock (I have seen the eggs in stock once)

Gladmaker
07/11/2017, 01:37 PM
Also where is my best bet of buying them bc liveaquaria is almost always out of stock (I have seen the eggs in stock once)

Liveaquaria iis showing 2 types of sharks now, both requiring 360 gallon tanks.

Mr. Eel
07/11/2017, 02:37 PM
Liveaquaria iis showing 2 types of sharks now, both requiring 360 gallon tanks.

They're not in stock ever. Just cuz showing doesnt mean they are regularly in stock.

ichthyogeek
07/11/2017, 02:49 PM
https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/online-suppliers.689197/

Try sharkandreef.com ? also blue zoo aquatics as well. I can't speak for their quality though....

Gladmaker
07/11/2017, 06:32 PM
They're not in stock ever. Just cuz showing doesnt mean they are regularly in stock.
I didn't notice that they are out of stock. They have a place that you can check for them to email you when in stock. You might try that. Liveaquaria has become my favorite online source. Everything I have received from them has been good. I really like that shipping is free for over $99 regardless of how many locations it ships from. I just now placed an order for some items from California and one item from Wisconsin for just over $100. Free shipping even though only one item is from Wisconsin. Shipping would have been about $45 if less than $99 so I just added about $45 more product and got it for about the same price with overnight air shipping.

Mr. Eel
07/11/2017, 10:49 PM
liveaquaria is great and my sole source of fish, but free shipping on orders over 99 is a special deal usually it has to be over 150.

alprazo
07/11/2017, 11:05 PM
If you are ok with running a chiller, chain cat sharks are a great captive bred option. Realistically they get about 14 inches long and could do well in a 250 gal. Unique looking and about the smallest shark you will find available. I keep mine between 55-57F, a very narrow temp range.

Contact Apex Aquatic Life if interested.

krj-1168
07/12/2017, 12:12 AM
The notion that you can keep any of the commonly available bamboo or epaulette sharks in a 180 gallon tank for it's entire life - is just plain FALSE. Keep in mind that a typical 180 gallon tank - is 6 feet long x 2 feet wide x 2 feet tall. Now you are planning to put a shark which will grow to be 3 to 4 feet long? That is just INSANE. This notion unfortunately has been caused by some rather poorly written books on the subject (like Aquarium Sharks and & Rays Scott Michael's).

A typical 180 gallon would make a good pupping tank - for raising juvenile bamboos & epaulettes or small catsharks. But after 12-18 months they will start to out grow the tank. And yes there are a few species of catsharks which can be kept for life or even breed in a typical 180 gallon. But those species are either a bit hard to acquire or require a chiller (which isn't really a problem) or both. Species such as the Izu, Cloudy, Bali, and Banded Sand Catsharks - all max out at between 16-20 inches/41-51 cm.

As for those sharp 90 degree corners - that is more of problem for swimming sharks. Benthic sharks can usually navigate those corners a lot better- usually without harming themselves.

GQsmooth
08/14/2017, 10:35 AM
Any shark/ray that would do ok in a 185

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Your advice is awful, please stop giving it.:headwallblue:

Triggerfish007
08/14/2017, 01:36 PM
Anyone heard of anyone in the group converting their swimming pool into a shark tank or building a pool outdoors to house sharks?? Thanks for any direction in this matter.

ichthyogeek
08/14/2017, 02:43 PM
You'd probs need to check out MonsterFishKeepers for a tank like that...but yes, I've heard of people converting pools into shark tanks; it would highly depend on where you live though. Any more questions on the matter would derail the thread, so best to make a new thread and ask on there :) .

squeakymcmurdo
08/14/2017, 04:25 PM
What about a Colombian Cat Shark? (Or 10) They are a brackish species as young but migrate to full marine as they age. The picture on LiveAquaria isn't very flattering. https://youtu.be/mkikdixvZyo

ichthyogeek
08/14/2017, 05:27 PM
Oohhh...a saltwater catfish species...not exactly a shark per se though...I think OP might've wanted an actual shark...

krj-1168
08/15/2017, 04:21 PM
Any shark/ray that would do ok in a 185


Seriously - you need to do some actual research and talk to people who have actually kept sharks and rays. Instead of just reciting books like Scott Michael's Aquarium Sharks and Rays.

Anyone who believes you can keep a 3 foot Bamboo/epaulette shark in a standard 180 gallon tank is - sadly mistaken.

McPuff
08/15/2017, 08:45 PM
Seriously - you need to do some actual research and talk to people who have actually kept sharks and rays. Instead of just reciting books like Scott Michael's Aquarium Sharks and Rays.

Anyone who believes you can keep a 3 foot Bamboo/epaulette shark in a standard 180 gallon tank is - sadly mistaken.

I had assumed that he was asking whether there are any sharks/rays that could be kept in a 185 (basing this in his previous inquiries).

FinnCole
08/22/2017, 02:52 PM
Your advice is awful, please stop giving it.:headwallblue:You do realise ideas asking a question not giving advice

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FinnCole
08/22/2017, 02:53 PM
Sorry it's not ment to say ideas it's meant to say asking a question

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benjammin03
08/23/2017, 09:36 AM
Punctuation, especially question marks, are pretty useful.

ichthyogeek
08/23/2017, 10:17 PM
Grammar *is* also useful as well :).