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welsher7
07/11/2017, 06:57 AM
I'm building a stand for 27g oceanic cube tank and I'm trying maximize the space in stand so I picked up a Kregg pocket jig, which by the way is the best thing ever, and some 1x3s. Everything went together great until I was reading through the forums last night and realized that the builds using similar build methods all used oak or plywood. I used select pine from HD. :headwally::headwally::headwally:

Do I need to start over with oak or plywood or is the pine strong enough for a 30g tank?????:confused::confused:

Knighthawk
07/11/2017, 07:07 AM
Pine will be just fine. Most of the off the shelf stands for smaller tanks is just compressed wood.


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mcgyvr
07/11/2017, 08:54 AM
Pine is just fine..

Its far more about how its built than what its built out of..

One could build a stand out of Popsicle sticks, balsa wood or Fairy dust without enough skill/thought into it..

welsher7
07/11/2017, 08:57 AM
I'll grab a picture of it when I get home from work. But it is standard construction with the verticals directly under the tank running all the way to the floor.


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GimpyFin
07/11/2017, 09:53 AM
I agree, just based on your description and how it was built, you're probably just fine. Keep in mind, most DIY stands are way overbuilt anyway.

welsher7
07/11/2017, 03:59 PM
Here is a picture of how it was built.

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/welsher7/30g%20cube%20rebuild/C3B2E7BD-2FC8-432A-91DC-5F7ADB00E1D4_zpsoplqhrpn.jpg (http://s114.photobucket.com/user/welsher7/media/30g%20cube%20rebuild/C3B2E7BD-2FC8-432A-91DC-5F7ADB00E1D4_zpsoplqhrpn.jpg.html)

I still have to add more bracing and build the doors. What do you guys think of it so far?

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TUNDRA_85
07/11/2017, 04:32 PM
well it looks really nice!

JonCubb
07/11/2017, 04:57 PM
It'll be fine, and looks nice too =).

Lsufan
07/11/2017, 06:42 PM
Most people use oak because it takes stain better then pine & has tighter grains so it looks better when stained. If u are painting then there is no point in spending the extra $ on oak

welsher7
07/11/2017, 06:44 PM
Most people use oak because it takes stain better then pine. If u are painting then there is no point in spending the extra $ on oak



I do plan on painting, so that is good to know. The is the first stand I've built that will actually be displayed and really my wood working project other than simple framing.


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der_wille_zur_macht
07/11/2017, 06:44 PM
It looks great. "Pine" is pretty wide open though. If I was building that and I felt like it was softer wood, I'd probably put some thin (1/4") plywood gussets in the corners to reinforce the joints between the posts and the beams. It's relatively easy to pull apart two screws into junky soft pine. It's much more difficult in really solid harder pine.

This stand is definitely strong enough in terms of supporting the static load vertically, but the one thing to worry about is other loads - like a child (or adult, I suppose) leaning against the stand when they're trying to look in, or accidentally jarring the tank when you're doing maintenance. Those weird twisting or sideways loads require pretty good joinery to resist.

welsher7
07/11/2017, 06:57 PM
It looks great. "Pine" is pretty wide open though. If I was building that and I felt like it was softer wood, I'd probably put some thin (1/4") plywood gussets in the corners to reinforce the joints between the posts and the beams.

This stand is definitely strong enough in terms of supporting the static load vertically, but the one thing to worry about is other loads - like a child (or adult, I suppose) leaning against the stand when they're trying to look in, or accidentally jarring the tank when you're doing maintenance. Those weird twisting or sideways loads require pretty good joinery to resist.


What do you mean by gussets? Do you mean a piece shaped like an "L" that would connect to vertical pieces to the horizontal pieces.

I added a piece of 3/4" ply to the bottom back. That is the white piece you see. I plan on adding some bracing adround the top and bottom by making 45* cuts to tie the top together.




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der_wille_zur_macht
07/11/2017, 07:06 PM
Yeah, basically. Doesn't have to be big or fancy, just let it span the joint and extend maybe 2 or 3 times the width of the wood along each member. Glue and screw. Like the pieces in this image:

http://res.cloudinary.com/engineering-com/image/upload/v1456281645/tips/gambrelframe3_x6yjvz.jpg

welsher7
07/11/2017, 07:09 PM
I added these triangle pieces to the bottom
http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/welsher7/30g%20cube%20rebuild/996237CE-29B4-4E60-8B2E-5E6029EB669E_zpszotzu3ml.jpg (http://s114.photobucket.com/user/welsher7/media/30g%20cube%20rebuild/996237CE-29B4-4E60-8B2E-5E6029EB669E_zpszotzu3ml.jpg.html)

And plan on adding pieces like this to the top, obviously with a 45 cut on each side.
http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/welsher7/30g%20cube%20rebuild/41A101D6-606D-4FB7-B405-AB90DEBB313E_zpsthdd1vwp.jpg (http://s114.photobucket.com/user/welsher7/media/30g%20cube%20rebuild/41A101D6-606D-4FB7-B405-AB90DEBB313E_zpsthdd1vwp.jpg.html)





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welsher7
07/11/2017, 07:10 PM
Yeah, basically. Doesn't have to be big or fancy, just let it span the joint and extend maybe 2 or 3 times the width of the wood along each member. Glue and screw. Like the pieces in this image:

http://res.cloudinary.com/engineering-com/image/upload/v1456281645/tips/gambrelframe3_x6yjvz.jpg



Thanks for image that explains it really well. I will work on that next.


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mcgyvr
07/12/2017, 07:06 AM
Nice work there...
Shows just how easy it can be and shows 2x4 construction is certainly not needed..

I love the Kreg jig myself.. I use it even when I don't need to .. Its just fun..

out of curiosity.. did you use wood glue too? (doesn't look like it or you are really clean with it)
If so its plenty strong as is without any additional gussets..
If not I would recommend going back and using glue.. and then just leave it as is..

A few kreg screws and a good wood glue and all good to go..

welsher7
07/12/2017, 08:56 AM
I did use wood glue. The pictures above after post sanding and I wiped off the extra as it squeezed out of the joints.

The stand feels rock solid since I have added the 3/4" ply to the back.
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ca1ore
07/12/2017, 09:14 AM
Since you're only talking a 27 gallon tank, stand is more than sufficient. Since you are painting, no big deal; but if staining, not a good idea to wipe off glue squeeze. Better to just let it harden then scrape it off. Wiping forces glue into the grain and creates stain issues.

Agree that pocket jigs are awesome.

welsher7
07/12/2017, 10:59 AM
Looks like I have a lot to learn about wood working/finishing......
thanks for all the information. I'll post more pictures as the build progresses.


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JTL
07/12/2017, 11:07 AM
Looks good and plenty strong enough.

DarkSkyForever
07/12/2017, 12:36 PM
Shouldn't horizontal runs always be full width? The way the stand is built above, the horizontal screws are taking all of the vertical load. Maybe it isn't an issue with a smaller tank.

mcgyvr
07/12/2017, 03:04 PM
Shouldn't horizontal runs always be full width? The way the stand is built above, the horizontal screws are taking all of the vertical load. Maybe it isn't an issue with a smaller tank.

Not really an issue here as the verticals can take all the weight anyways..

But yes its best not to put screws in shear as the only weight bearing members..

welsher7
07/12/2017, 04:10 PM
For future reference would it have been better if the horizontals went the full width of the tank?


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Gladmaker
07/12/2017, 04:24 PM
For the size you have, the 4 corners will take the full load. If you had a long tank, then it could be an issue. Then you would want the top horizontals to be full width. Looks good.