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zsuman101
07/14/2017, 09:02 AM
Anybody out there dosing peroxide for algae maintenance? If so what amounts and frequency are you dosing. Also pluses and drawbacks if any . Thanx.....zsu

devastator007
07/14/2017, 01:05 PM
I've tried in the past, and it's not effective to be dosed directly in the tank. To have any good results, you have to remove the rock from the tank and soak it in peroxide for 5 minutes. This will kill the algae but also kill many other things on the rock.

There are other better ways to control algea

myaquariumpro
07/14/2017, 02:02 PM
I dose redsea nopox, works great


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zsuman101
07/14/2017, 09:56 PM
I've tried in the past, and it's not effective to be dosed directly in the tank. To have any good results, you have to remove the rock from the tank and soak it in peroxide for 5 minutes. This will kill the algae but also kill many other things on the rock.

There are other better ways to control algeawell theres a coral farmer by me that doses peroxide in his growout tables and he also doses nitrate to feed the corals, his stuff is pretty amazing, and no algae anywhere. just wondered if anybody else does this. and he doses the water not the rocks, no skimmer, no carbon, no gfo, no carbon dosing. its crazy

Dan_P
07/15/2017, 03:24 PM
Aquaculture is a complex operation and success is not subject to a single factor. The coral grower is probably doing many things right. You will have to ask him what he thinks the role the peroxide is playing. The reason might be scientifically unfounded though.

bertoni
07/15/2017, 09:25 PM
A number of people have dosed hydrogen peroxide in the water. It might reduce the organics in the water column a bit. As long as the dose is small and there are no fish in the system, it's likely safe enough. Without knowing what someone is trying to accomplish, it's hard to judge whether hydrogen peroxide is a reasonable approach.

zsuman101
07/16/2017, 08:22 AM
A number of people have dosed hydrogen peroxide in the water. It might reduce the organics in the water column a bit. As long as the dose is small and there are no fish in the system, it's likely safe enough. Without knowing what someone is trying to accomplish, it's hard to judge whether hydrogen peroxide is a reasonable approach.he is dosing 1ml per 10 gal daily. he says hes a pretty lazy reefer as well, i just dont get it. it looks sterile its so clean, and you can watch the stuff grow.

tmz
07/16/2017, 11:54 AM
It's an oxidant and kills many things seen and unseen ;some desirable organisms too. Dosing it in tank is something I don't recommend but if you do ,use it sparingly and with caution.

Dan_P
07/16/2017, 04:35 PM
It's an oxidant and kills many things seen and unseen ;some desirable organisms too. Dosing it in tank is something I don't recommend but if you do ,use it sparingly and with caution.

When peroxide decomposes, it produces oxygen, but there is a limit to how much can dissolve in salt water, maybe 7 ppm. After that bubbles form. So adding peroxide can result in oxygen saturated water but that does not seem tbat toxic.

At pH 8, I wonder is H2O2 very reactive? Is the thinking peroxide radical forms and does bad things?

Could you clarify "it kills many things"?

tmz
07/17/2017, 10:23 AM
There are a number of threads and very long discussion perserverative discussions on it in this forum a couple of years ago . While it does add O2; it also breaks up organics and kills some algae and microfuana as well as bacteria . I've used it and observed it kill coraline ,serpent stars pods and damage some corals. Others note certain corals and inverts like shrimp on a rather long casualty list . I still use it as a dip out of tank for some corals to remove red turf algae infestations , the pH of the water used is around 8.2 in the dip of 4 parts salt water and 1 part 5% hydrgen peroxide.

This may also be of interest:

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/hydrogen_peroxide#section=Top

My thinking is it can play havoc with the organics in a tank and if used should be done with caution and at low dosages;thoughj I don't see anyone would want to use it that way.

rajilnaja
07/17/2017, 10:38 AM
I used it for about 4 weeks to fight dinos, I was only using .5ml per 10 gallons. It had no impact on any alage growth or the dinos. Can tell you that I lost a YWG a week or so after stopping it, and that zoas close up as soon as the first drop hits the water. Some people swear by it but it did nothing for me, and I wasnt brave enough to move up to the 1ml per 10 gallons some people use.

karimwassef
07/17/2017, 11:52 AM
Peroxide can slow down the rampant takeover of dinos but it can't stop them. For algae, it works like a chemical scalpel in a small tank. You have to locally dose it in/on the infected region.

If you're struggling with just turf algae though, then set up a turf scrubber and avoid the hassle.

Dirte_Plumber
07/17/2017, 01:47 PM
I heard/seen Peroxide use if A System goes through a Mini Cycle or the Sumps Bacteria was hurts.
I was told the Excess Oxygen frees up the Ammonia Build up so the Skimmer Can Skim the Ammonia harder...
The System recovered, don't remember major water changes during process...
But, not always recommended except in highly emergency situations!

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Dan_P
07/17/2017, 04:00 PM
Thanks Tom. Upon further reading, peroxide application could be iffy when you don't monitor concentrations. Here are some variables.

1) Actual hydrogen peroxide concentration. This material can decompose to oxygen an water, resulting in less than intended concentration. Or if it is more stable thsn expected, the concentration is increasing after every dose.

2) The presence of iron (II) or iron (III) can generate reactive oxygen species which can be very harmful. Depending on an aquariums iron content, these species can be in high or low concentration.

3) Contact time. The amount of 3% hydrogen peroxide being used, for example 10 mL per 10 gallons, could require an exposure time of 24 hours to kill bacteria. Depending on how long peroxide lasts in an aquarium will determine bacteriacidal effect.

4) Many bacteria and other organisms produce an enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide.

Just considering these factors and your observations, it is a real crap shoot when you toss hydrogen peroxide into an aquarium. Almost seems irresponsible unless you are at least measuring the concentration.

Dan

bertoni
07/17/2017, 05:53 PM
I was told the Excess Oxygen frees up the Ammonia Build up so the Skimmer Can Skim the Ammonia harder...

I don't think that's correct. Our tanks generally have plenty of oxygen, so I don't see how adding a tiny bit more could help. I also don't know how oxygen could make ammonia skimmable.

Dirte_Plumber
07/19/2017, 04:54 AM
That's What I was Told By a 40+ LFS Owner, he said it breaks the Ammonia Molecule free and that the Skimmer would help.

By no means would I ever do so.
But I will always listen to people's reasoning before I go Hard Left or Right!

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Dan_P
07/19/2017, 10:21 AM
I was told the Excess Oxygen frees up the Ammonia Build up so the Skimmer Can Skim the Ammonia harder...
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Just on face value, this rationale makes no sense whatsoever and when I read it my BS detectors came online. We'll give the LFS a break though since we did not hear his explanation first hand. And just a bit of griping, I don't get why people are so willing to chuck stuff into their aquarium.

tmz
07/19/2017, 11:13 AM
I agree, can't find a plausible reason to think peroxide would :

he Excess Oxygen frees up the Ammonia Build up so the Skimmer Can Skim the Ammonia harder...

It makes makes no sense to me . Skimmers skim amphipathic organics like proteins ; oxidants like peroxide breakup organics ; ammonia oxidizing bacteria need oxygen but they convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrate which are not skimmable.

bertoni
07/19/2017, 06:04 PM
That's What I was Told By a 40+ LFS Owner, he said it breaks the Ammonia Molecule free and that the Skimmer would help.

What does he mean by "break the ammonia molecule free"? By definition, ammonia itself is a gas, and it's not generally bound in our aquariums. That's why it can be toxic. It's possible to oxidize ammonia. That's what bacteria do when converting it to nitrate and extract energy. I don't see any way that hydrogen peroxide could accomplish that in a living tank, though.