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Arthur34
07/17/2017, 03:15 AM
Hey everyone, first and foremost, I don't no if I am asking this question on the right thread, but I will give it a shot. I used to keep fish as a hobby, and it's been a while since I have been involved with this hobby.

Purchased a new 32 biocube- cycled water for several days (freshwater) upon putting in some fish.
Filtration is stock, I just have the stock cartridge pad in the first section of the media basket.
Air pump is the one the tank comes with, I have added a extra line pump in the water.
Water got murky or cloudy, for a day or two now. There are fish in it, and for some reason, they are acting a little weird. Some laying on bottom, others on the top. I assume it may be a nitrate or ammonia problem, maybe?

I have had issues with some of the smaller fish swim or jump into the back of the aquarium. I had to put my hand in the air pump side, refigium and media basket to net some out. My arms were clean, but I did notice it getting murkier there after .

My questions are, what do you guys suggest for a freshwater 32 biocube when it comes to filtration and air pump? Should I add anything to the media basket? Or refigium?
Any idea why the water maybe dirty? What can I do to possibly fix this. Some things come to mind such as a 25 percent water change and adding more conditioner , but anything else??

What tips do you have for these sort of tanks. Atm I have guppies in there , swordtails, few corys , neon Tetras.

Any help would be appreciated :)

ReefWreak
07/17/2017, 07:35 AM
Let me preface this with that I have no freshwater experience.

Since you mentioned it, it's probably worth picking up some test kits for ammonia and nitrate, since ammonia is poisonous to fishes, freshwater or saltwater. Testing for it to confirm would be a good idea if you're having issues. You can also buy an Ammonia Alert badge to stick somewhere hidden (sides towards the back, or in the rear chamber in the "top off viewing glass". Just a thought.

Also, to cycle water, you probably need to add a source of ammonia first, not just let tapwater with conditioner run. Again, I'm no FW expert, but I imagine that's what cycling is for FW as it is for SW.

Good luck, share some pictures!

reef cuber
07/18/2017, 10:33 AM
How many and what kind of fish?

Goldfish are huge waste producers and need more space to water ratio vs a bunch of little tetras would. I personally wouldn't mix golds with other FW as they have different needs. Golds don't need a heater, but most other tropical fish do. Plus Golds like a little salt in their water.

How much food are you giving?
Feed only what they eat, and net out any left overs.

Definitely test the water. Cloudy water with FW usually means ammonia spike. Do a 50% water change. Use RO water, you can get it at any LFS.

You have to establish a FW tank like SW. It will have to go through a cycle too. I would have either, only started with a small fish and added more slowly, and gotten some dirty filter water from a friend with FW or the LFS to start your cycle. You can use bacteria starter as well.

reef cuber
07/18/2017, 10:36 AM
Let me preface this with that I have no freshwater experience.

Since you mentioned it, it's probably worth picking up some test kits for ammonia and nitrate, since ammonia is poisonous to fishes, freshwater or saltwater. Testing for it to confirm would be a good idea if you're having issues. You can also buy an Ammonia Alert badge to stick somewhere hidden (sides towards the back, or in the rear chamber in the "top off viewing glass". Just a thought.

Also, to cycle water, you probably need to add a source of ammonia first, not just let tapwater with conditioner run. Again, I'm no FW expert, but I imagine that's what cycling is for FW as it is for SW.

Good luck, share some pictures!

Believe it or not, this is what petsmart was telling people to do, run an empty tank with no sources. It certainly isn't enough to start a tank. As soon as a bunch of fish are tossed in, boom goes the ammonia!

Ryan Darilek
07/19/2017, 10:23 PM
I'll gladly step in here since I have ample FW experience. Although it is not as intense or sensitive as saltwater, freshwater tanks do still have cycles and require beneficial bacteria to break down the bad stuff. Your tank, being newly set up, does not have this bacteria yet and therefore the cloudiness is a build up of all those, basically toxins (mainly ammonia). You are going through what is called "New Tank Syndrome" (research this) and you need to act immediately or all of your fish will die, I'm sorry to be blunt. Remove all of those fish asap and get them into clean (dechlorinated) water. You then need to a 50% water change. Go by your LFS or most any pet store and pick up a bottle of freshwater bacteria to help kickstart the process. This bacteria will feed on the ammonia your fish create and make the water safe for your fish. Your tank will be growing this bacteria on its own within a couple of days and then you'll never need to worry about this happening again. Once your water is clear, your tank will be safe. I hope that I'm not getting this advice to you too late. Good luck man, and don't let this speed bump detour you from this awesome hobby. I highly recommend doing plenty of research moving forward (i.e fish diseases so you know what to look for etc.) and that will help you out too. Get the basics down, enjoy it, continue learning and then after success, consider making the jump to saltwater! It's a whole other world! :)

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

ReefWreak
07/20/2017, 12:35 PM
These are interesting and good replies, I hope the OP is able to use this info to save his fish.

For future reference, is there a FW-focused site like ReefCentral where I can recommend people spend some time researching?

Maybe some day, particularly if I can never get myself a big tank, I'd be interested in starting a nice amano-style tank too. I be they're almost as much work as my reef tank...