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View Full Version : where to get good led kits


chris_s9181
07/26/2017, 04:31 AM
i want to make my own lights for my tank where can i get good supplys to do so

mcgyvr
07/26/2017, 04:35 AM
ebay
http://www.rapidled.com/
https://reefledlights.com/
http://www.ledsupply.com

Gorgok
07/26/2017, 05:53 AM
I just wish the DIY-ish leds would start making rectified AC switching led drivers so i don't have to try and make my own... I mean i understand its nice selling of LDD700s by the fistful and boards for them to sit on, then power supplies on top of that, but a board that just plugs in to the wall with 4-5 channels would be lovely.

chris_s9181
07/27/2017, 01:07 AM
how do i make sure i do not have to many lights on a dimmer

mcgyvr
07/27/2017, 05:00 AM
how do i make sure i do not have to many lights on a dimmer

huh?
They should all be dimmable..

or do you mean driver not dimmer?

If so the sum of the Vf (forward voltage rating) of the LEDs must be below the max stated DC output voltage on the driver..
And greater than the min..

Example.. The LED has a VF of 3.1V..
The driver you find has a DC output voltage range of 24-48VDC..
So you can run 48/3.1 = 15 LEDs on that driver in one series string..
and no less than 8 LEDs

chris_s9181
07/27/2017, 05:57 AM
thank you it has been over 10 years since i used electronics since my high school days i used to even know how resistors and transistors worked lol good old days

mcgyvr
07/27/2017, 06:42 AM
And the output current rating of the driver should be greater than or equal to the LEDs required current..
So if the LED is rated for 1A current then a 1000mA (or 700mA) rated driver is good..

Note: its best not to run them at their max rating (unless good quality LEDs and you have ensured your heatsinking is sufficient to keep junction temperatures low)

I also recommend avoiding parallel configurations too as LEDs don't share nicely in all situations and you can run into thermal runaway where one string is pulling more current than the other..

bblumberg
07/27/2017, 09:41 AM
ebay
http://www.rapidled.com/
https://reefledlights.com/
http://www.ledsupply.com

All good. I would add

https://blueacro.com/
http://www.stevesleds.com/

bblumberg
07/27/2017, 09:46 AM
And let's not forget sources for power supplies and LDD-H drivers

http://www.mouser.com/
https://www.digikey.com/
http://www.onlinecomponents.com/ **good prices on LDD-H here **

NanoReefWanabe
07/28/2017, 12:16 AM
My stuff is from l e d group b u y.com, why doesn't RC like that web address?

hkgar
07/28/2017, 02:23 PM
http://www.stevesleds.com/

They understand tank lighting and will work with you to customize. I use lights from them for my ATS.

bblumberg
07/28/2017, 08:58 PM
My stuff is from l e d group b u y.com, why doesn't RC like that web address?

Probably not a sponsor....

oreo57
07/29/2017, 09:10 AM
I just wish the DIY-ish leds would start making rectified AC switching led drivers so i don't have to try and make my own... I mean i understand its nice selling of LDD700s by the fistful and boards for them to sit on, then power supplies on top of that, but a board that just plugs in to the wall with 4-5 channels would be lovely.

https://www.prbx.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/PRBX_High-Wattage-LED-fact-sheet_april30.pdf

saf1
07/29/2017, 04:35 PM
You don't have to buy LDD's, etc. Just depends on the driver choice. Look at blue acro's portal. That is what I'm using in the new build. Outside maybe lacking DIY skills I see no reason to buy anything off the shelf. They are more or less cost prohibitive in my personal opinion.

Gorgok
07/29/2017, 08:37 PM
Those are neat and all, but still require DC supplies. Oreo's link was like what i am planning (really slowly working on). There is no need for a DC supply with power straight from the AC socket and modern switching drivers. The biggest issue with them is probably the chance that you can notice the ripple of the 0 volt period in the source.

Haven't found anything quite as nice sounding to me as the AL9902 for the driver in my recent searches. Its just that the inductor math actually requires me to settle on the strings and such, choose frequencies etc... Commitment is hard.

lingwendil
07/29/2017, 09:23 PM
The exact details will dictate the best way to do things, but as a basic "starter kit" of advice...

For a noob, I say give the LED arrays from Blueacro (https://blueacro.com/acrostar/) a shot. Solderless connections, expertly designed and made, and current generation LED tech that none of the other guys have yet. He's also a member on here (user "Theatrus") and is willing to customise directly. Using these particular arrays will simplify the wiring and mounting greatly, and they are available with a reflector/diffusor combo for just a couple bucks extra. He also sells adjustable drivers, so all you need is a DC supply and a controller, and your choice of Heatsink. He sells small heatsinks, and will drill/tap them for you at no additional charge!

Otherwise, if going the individual emitter route, I honestly prefer Steve's LEDs (http://www.stevesleds.com/3-up-Tristar--Seperate-Wiring--AntiDisco_p_266.html) over all the others. He carries much better bins on the usual LED's you see, and the Luxeon LED's he carries are more efficient than CREE. The 3-up boards are a great way to reduce the disco-ball color scatter effect you get from the usual poor-layout of arranging LEDs in rows. A nice tight cluster is a much better way to build.

Stay away from any of the cheap LED kits you see using individual 1-3w bridgelux and epistar LEDs, they are less efficient and don't last as long, in addition to having poor consistency from LED to LED.

The t-slot heatsinks from LEDgroup-whatever (sorry, Reefcentral has a petty quarrel that keeps them from being discussed) popularly known as the "Maker's Heatsink" is an excellent choice, as is the t-slot Pro heatsink selection at RapidLED. I highly recommend a t-slot design over thermal adhesive or drill/tap arrangements. I just got one of these and can easily recommend it, good price and looks great- RAPIDLED 6x20" Premium heatsink/enclosure (http://www.rapidled.com/6-x-20-premium-heat-sink-and-enclosure/)

Word of advice-
Do not use cool white LEDs. They will not work or look as well as a good high-CRI Neutral white will. 4000k Neutral white Luxeon Rebel ES will work well,and if you go for a pre-made array like those from BlueAcro, all the guesswork is done for you as color mix is concerned.

oreo57
07/30/2017, 12:20 AM
Those are neat and all, but still require DC supplies. Oreo's link was like what i am planning (really slowly working on). There is no need for a DC supply with power straight from the AC socket and modern switching drivers. The biggest issue with them is probably the chance that you can notice the ripple of the 0 volt period in the source.

Haven't found anything quite as nice sounding to me as the AL9902 for the driver in my recent searches. Its just that the inductor math actually requires me to settle on the strings and such, choose frequencies etc... Commitment is hard.

Since it seems AC/DC power supplies are the weak link in the wall to photon chain still will prefer separates..

From the Chinese capacitor rot, to compact florescent to high power cheap led floods. it's usually the AC/DC unit that fails.........

Gorgok
07/30/2017, 12:30 AM
Omitting capacitors (entirely possible) at least electrolytics and especially cheap names will deal with much of that.

And lots of those cheap ac/dc leds are capacitive droppers and nothing more, no switching and no cc.