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Dummyforclownfi
07/26/2017, 11:22 PM
So a post in a different thread made me think of this question. What's the max size of tank we should have on the second floor of your home? Let's not get technical about my flooring because I don't have a clue but let's try to define a general guideline for the max size of tank we should have on the second floor. I have a 210 gallon tank.


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Wes8888
07/26/2017, 11:29 PM
I really do not know, but I have a 125g tank upstairs living room sitting by the outer wall and on a supporting beam. Yet, whenever someone walk through the living room, I can see ripple on the tank. I really do not feel safe putting anything bigger up there.

Dummyforclownfi
07/26/2017, 11:31 PM
I really do not know, but I have a 125g tank upstairs living room sitting by the outer wall and on a supporting beam. Yet, whenever someone walk through the living room, I can see ripple on the tank. I really do not feel safe putting anything bigger up there.



Thanks for the reply. I personally don't feel safe with more than 75 gallons upstairs.


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Ryan Darilek
07/26/2017, 11:40 PM
Depends on the construction of your home of course. What year was your home built? That will tell me which type of construction methods were used (which types of joists and distance between) and I can then let you know the max load bearing.

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Dummyforclownfi
07/26/2017, 11:41 PM
Depends on the construction of your home of course. What year was your home built? That will tell me which type of construction methods were used (which types of joists and distance between) and I can then let you know the max load bearing.

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Exactly why I stated don't ask for specifics. Looking more for a general rule of thumb or a estimate for "most".


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Ryan Darilek
07/26/2017, 11:56 PM
Exactly why I stated don't ask for specifics. Looking more for a general rule of thumb or a estimate for "most".


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkNot asking you for specifics... Just the year the home was built and then I would know the specifics because I'm a General Contractor and am well versed in National Building Code, so I would know. Lol.
Okay... If your home is newer than 2004, putting a 2500 lbs. tank upstairs won't be an issue. 82-2004 it could be and would have to be carefully placed to work (by a load bearing wall and placed perpendicular to the floor joists so the weight isn't distributed on only one or two of them, but multiple). Constructed before 1982? Wouldn't put any more than 1500 lbs.


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Dummyforclownfi
07/26/2017, 11:58 PM
Not asking you for specifics... Just the year the home was built and then I would know the specifics because I'm a General Contractor and am well versed in National Building Code, so I would know. Lol.
Okay... If your home is newer than 2004, putting a 2500 lbs. tank upstairs won't be an issue. 82-2004 it could be and would have to be carefully placed to work (by a load bearing wall and placed perpendicular to the floor joists so the weight isn't distributed on only one or two of them, but multiple). Constructed before 1982? Wouldn't put any more than 1500 lbs.


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Ah I see. I live in a town home which was built in 2005.


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Dummyforclownfi
07/26/2017, 11:59 PM
Ah I see. I live in a town home which was built in 2005.


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Also it is in Springfield Oregon.


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Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 12:08 AM
Also it is in Springfield Oregon.


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkBoom. Perfect. Yes sir, a 210 would be fine up there. You have I-joists in the floor that are 12" on center and therefore the structural load will support 3000 lbs. per square foot. So you figure a 210g would weigh about 2100 lbs but will cover 6-10 sqft which is well under weight capacity :)

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Dummyforclownfi
07/27/2017, 12:11 AM
Boom. Perfect. Yes sir, a 210 would be fine up there. You have I-joists in the floor that are 12" on center and therefore the structural load will support 3000 lbs. per square foot. So you figure a 210g would weigh about 2100 lbs but will cover 6-10 sqft which is well under weight capacity :)

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You sound like you know what your talking about lol. It's a 6 foot platform with a 40 gallon sump. You sure I can do this? Any particular way it should sit on the floor?


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Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 12:22 AM
You would like you know what your talking about lol. It's a 6 foot platform with a 40 gallon sump. You sure I can do this? Any particular way it should sit on the floor?


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkYes, I'm positive. I would set the tank so that it is perpendicular on the joists and not horizontal. It's a little difficult to explain which direction your joists are running... But this will probably work: if you use your gutter on the roof as a starting point and then point in the direction the roof goes up to the peak (ridge), that is the direction your joists go... You will want your tank to be perpendicular to that direction. I hope this makes sense, but if it doesn't, let me know and I will draw up a quick sketch for you.

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Dummyforclownfi
07/27/2017, 12:28 AM
Yes, I'm positive. I would set the tank so that it is perpendicular on the joists and not horizontal. It's a little difficult to explain which direction your joists are running... But this will probably work: if you use your gutter on the roof as a starting point and then point in the direction the roof goes up to the peak (ridge), that is the direction your joists go... You will want your tank to be perpendicular to that direction. I hope this makes sense, but if it doesn't, let me know and I will draw up a quick sketch for you.

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You sir are amazing!


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Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 12:36 AM
You sir are amazing!


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkI wouldn't go that far... But happy I could help man! Let's see pics of this bad boy when you get it up and running!

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Dummyforclownfi
07/27/2017, 12:37 AM
I wouldn't go that far... But happy I could help man! Let's see pics of this bad boy when you get it up and running!

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Can I PM you pics of my place? Maybe figure this out a little better? It would be tomorrow.


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Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 12:50 AM
Can I PM you pics of my place? Maybe figure this out a little better? It would be tomorrow.


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkYeah of course man. I'll PM you my number and you can just text me

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norfolkgarden
07/27/2017, 12:56 PM
Yes, I'm positive. I would set the tank so that it is perpendicular on the joists and not horizontal. It's a little difficult to explain which direction your joists are running... But this will probably work: if you use your gutter on the roof as a starting point and then point in the direction the roof goes up to the peak (ridge), that is the direction your joists go... You will want your tank to be perpendicular to that direction. I hope this makes sense, but if it doesn't, let me know and I will draw up a quick sketch for you.

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Thank you

I have never thought about it before but it makes perfect sense.

Neat hack.

Will that be true 98% of the time?



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Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 04:44 PM
Thank you

I have never thought about it before but it makes perfect sense.

Neat hack.

Will that be true 98% of the time?



Sent from my SM-G920V using TapatalkYeah most of the time that will always be the case, unless it's a hip roof... Which those aren't too common on homes :)

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norfolkgarden
07/27/2017, 05:32 PM
Yeah most of the time that will always be the case, unless it's a hip roof... Which those aren't too common on homes :)

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Lol, our last house had a hip roof. Attic like a middle school gymnasium.

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ericarenee
07/27/2017, 08:10 PM
i must live in a very uncommon area and work in many uncommon homes.. Hip roofs are everywhere..


What's the max size of tank we should have on the second floor of your home
Looking more for a general rule of thumb

No such thing .

This can not be answered without Knowledge of the home. There is no Blanket this size i OK No matter what..

Professional ADVICE.

Ryan Darilek
07/27/2017, 08:55 PM
i must live in a very uncommon area and work in many uncommon homes.. Hip roofs are everywhere..


What's the max size of tank we should have on the second floor of your home
Looking more for a general rule of thumb

No such thing .

This can not be answered without Knowledge of the home. There is no Blanket this size i OK No matter what..

Professional ADVICE.Where do you live? I guess I should have clarified "in the states I've lived in and built in".
I agree with your statement, which is why I was trying to determine which IRC/IBC his home would probably fall under. As a fellow professional, do you agree with the advice I gave him above?

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Gladmaker
07/27/2017, 09:03 PM
General rule of thumb isn't much help on this. About like asking "as a general rule of thumb, how much wind will it take to blow down my 2 story house?" The answer would be it depends basically on how old the house is. If it's 100 years old and hasn't been maintained, it may not take much wind, but if it's a year old, it may withstand a lot of wind. It would also depend if it was well built or built by someone that didn't know what they were doing. The above answers were good once the age and location were determined. Even then that's not exact as there can be some variables.

Sk8r
07/29/2017, 05:07 PM
We have a 105 gallon (weighs 800 lbs empty) sitting on the main floor above a basement. Our subfloor is thick diagonal planking topped with half-inch plywood, topped again with quarter inch ply to even out imperfections---it sits in a corner along the center 'spine' wall of a 1950's rancher. I have been shown houses where a step on the second floor causes the whole floor to quake---that would be a no. If you have a good supporting load-bearing wall and good subfloor, or foam concrete (apartment) I'd say you'd be good: we had to move ours when we took up the carpet and put down laminate, and I'd estimate our weight at about 1600 lbs. [We emptied it down to about 8" to get felt glides under it.]

fabulousfavia
08/01/2017, 09:05 AM
You sound like you know what your talking about lol. It's a 6 foot platform with a 40 gallon sump. You sure I can do this? Any particular way it should sit on the floor?


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I have a lot of tanks upstaitrs. 55g, 40g, qt, four nano tanks, and a horseshoe crab tank.


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dutch27
08/01/2017, 12:17 PM
IBC live loads for habitable residential space is 40psf live load. I recently did some timber member load ratings at work and got into the loadings and AWC span tables a bit. 3000psf is massive, pedestrian bridges are only designed for 90psf live load, warehouse space for heavy storage is 250psf (I also recently rated a steel storage deck). I'd be surprised if someone was spec'ing a house for 3000psf live load.

OP I would recommend engaging a local engineer or architect if you're concerned. Get a licensed professional to give a formal opinion. If they are wrong, they are liable. They also know your local codes and typical local methods of construction. It's worth it if you're worried. Think of it as an insurance policy.